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Previous Selected Topics Courses (Courses from past 3 years)

5397 ADR Survey - BREGANT (offered in Fall  2022)
The vast majority of day-to-day disputes are resolved (formally and informally) without litigation. This survey course focuses on introducing students to some of the most common processes involved in so-called “alternative” dispute resolution, including negotiation, mediation, and arbitration. In addition to the legal foundations of these processes, the course emphasizes psychological insights and practical strategies for lawyers. A core component of this course is simulation exercises, in which students get the chance to try out techniques and strategies for themselves. To ensure that all students get the most out of these exercises, a large part of the course grade is based on students’ preparation for and participation in every class session. Missing class without prior notice, or missing several classes even with prior notice, will make it difficult to successfully complete the course. The remainder of the course grade will be based on short written assignments and a final exam.

5397 Advanced Drafting for Corporate Transactions - GINSBURG (offered in Fall  2023)
The purpose of this course is to prepare students for their first year of general corporate practice, whether in an in-house, law firm, or solo practice setting, by completing a simulated financing for an M&A transaction. The course will focus on how secured transactions law, bankruptcy law and corporate law influence the structuring and documenting of the financing for a typical M&A transaction. Students will work through a hypothetical transaction that will be the focal point of the entire semester. The class will begin by discussing alternative capital structures and how bank loans are used to finance acquisitions, along with growth and working capital needs. We will then analyze and draft credit and security documents, and learn how specific contract provisions are important to both borrowers and lenders. We will analyze all stages of a finance transaction, and discuss the often divergent strategies and goals of lenders and borrowers. The fundamentals of negotiating critical provisions of a leveraged finance transaction will be stressed, with emphasis on private equity investors and their finance sources. The professor will relate many of his experiences in global finance transactions and share provisions from actual loan documentation to demonstrate how those fundamentals are applied in actual transactions. Although the course will be of particular interest to those pursuing a corporate or commercial law career, the concepts are applicable to any transactional practice.

5397 Advanced Drafting for Corporate Transactions - GINSBURG (offered in Spring  2024)
The purpose of this course is to prepare students for their first year of general corporate practice, whether in an in-house, law firm, or solo practice setting, by completing a simulated financing for an M&A transaction. The course will focus on how secured transactions law, bankruptcy law and corporate law influence the structuring and documenting of the financing for a typical M&A transaction. Students will work through a hypothetical transaction that will be the focal point of the entire semester. The class will begin by discussing alternative capital structures and how bank loans are used to finance acquisitions, along with growth and working capital needs. We will then analyze and draft credit and security documents, and learn how specific contract provisions are important to both borrowers and lenders. We will analyze all stages of a finance transaction, and discuss the often divergent strategies and goals of lenders and borrowers. The fundamentals of negotiating critical provisions of a leveraged finance transaction will be stressed, with emphasis on private equity investors and their finance sources. The professor will relate many of his experiences in global finance transactions and share provisions from actual loan documentation to demonstrate how those fundamentals are applied in actual transactions. Although the course will be of particular interest to those pursuing a corporate or commercial law career, the concepts are applicable to any transactional practice.

5197 Advanced Legal Research: Appellate Advocacy - BROWNELL (offered in Spring  2024)
This is a specialized course on legal research methods as they pertain to appellate advocacy. It will cover general legal research topics and resources (issue analysis, secondary sources, statutes, cases, etc.) within the context of appeals. It will also cover topics and resources that are especially useful to the practice of appellate advocacy such as finding and using court rules, filings, and resources; practice books, forms, and checklists; dockets; and legislative history.

5197 Advanced Legal Research: Appellate Advocacy - BROWNELL (offered in Spring  2023)
This is a specialized course on legal research methods as they pertain to appellate advocacy. It will cover general legal research topics and resources (issue analysis, secondary sources, statutes, cases, etc.) within the context of appeals. It will also cover topics and resources that are especially useful to the practice of appellate advocacy such as finding and using court rules, filings, and resources; practice books, forms, and checklists; dockets; and legislative history.

5197 Advanced Legal Research: Trial Advocacy - BROWNELL (offered in Fall  2023)

5197 Advanced Legal Research: Trial Advocacy - BROWNELL (offered in Fall  2024)
This is a specialized course on legal research methods as they pertain to trial advocacy. It will cover general legal research topics and resources (issue analysis, secondary sources, statutes, cases, etc.) within the litigation context, focusing on practical application. Students will apply their skills through research problems that simulate legal practice.

5197 Advocacy Board ONE - LAWRENCE (offered in Summer II  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for participation in the governance and operation of Blakely student advocacy organizations

5197 Advocacy Board ONE - LAWRENCE (offered in Summer IV  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for participation in the governance and operation of Blakely student advocacy organizations

5197 Advocacy Board ONE - LAWRENCE (offered in Spring  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for participation in the governance and operation of Blakely student advocacy organizations.

5197 Advocacy Board TWO - LAWRENCE (offered in Spring  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for participation in the governance and operation of Blakely student advocacy organizations.

5197 Advocacy Board TWO - LAWRENCE (offered in Summer IV  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for participation in the governance and operation of Blakely student advocacy organizations

5197 Advocacy Board TWO - LAWRENCE (offered in Summer II  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for participation in the governance and operation of Blakely student advocacy organizations

5197 Advocacy Competition FOUR - LAWRENCE (offered in Summer II  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for Blakely administered competitions.

5197 Advocacy Competition FOUR - LAWRENCE (offered in Summer IV  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for Blakely administered competitions.

5197 Advocacy Competition FOUR - LAWRENCE (offered in Spring  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for Blakely administered competitions.

5197 Advocacy Competition ONE - LAWRENCE (offered in Spring  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for Blakely administered competitions.

5197 Advocacy Competition ONE - LAWRENCE (offered in Summer IV  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for Blakely administered competitions.

5197 Advocacy Competition ONE - LAWRENCE (offered in Summer II  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for Blakely administered competitions.

5197 Advocacy Competition THREE - LAWRENCE (offered in Summer II  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for Blakely administered competitions.

5197 Advocacy Competition THREE - LAWRENCE (offered in Spring  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for Blakely administered competitions.

5197 Advocacy Competition THREE - LAWRENCE (offered in Summer IV  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for Blakely administered competitions.

5197 Advocacy Competition TWO - LAWRENCE (offered in Spring  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for Blakely administered competitions.

5197 Advocacy Competition TWO - LAWRENCE (offered in Summer II  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for Blakely administered competitions.

5197 Advocacy Competition TWO - LAWRENCE (offered in Summer IV  2022)
The course enables students to lodge credit for Blakely administered competitions.

5297 Advocacy Survey - LAWRENCE/JONES (offered in Summer II  2022)
This unique course is designed to provide students the opportunity to experience a wide spectrum of legal advocacy. Course segments include Pre-Trial Litigation, Trial Advocacy, Appellate Advocacy, Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration. Each course segment contains a brief overview of 1) the legal underpinnings for each topic area and, 2) the skills necessary to be an effective advocate in that topic area.

5297 Advocacy Survey - LAWRENCE/JONES (offered in Summer II  2023)
This unique course is designed to provide students the opportunity to experience a wide spectrum of legal advocacy. Course segments include Pre-Trial Litigation, Trial Advocacy, Appellate Advocacy, Negotiation, Mediation, and Arbitration. Each course segment contains a brief overview of 1) the legal underpinnings for each topic area and, 2) the skills necessary to be an effective advocate in that topic area.

5397 AI Regulation - TODD/LEVINE (offered in Fall  2024)
The objective of the class is to provide the students and future practitioners with the tools necessary for addressing and engaging with the dynamic and rapidly evolving area of artificial intelligence law, policy and regulation, including a review of its foundations.

5297 Alternative Energy Transactions and Contracting - BORREGO (offered in Spring  2024)
Alternative Energy Transactions and Contracting: This course is designed to familiarize students with the most common forms of alternative energy currently in use in Texas, or which may become sources of alternative energy. In addition, the course will familiarize students with the problems involved in carbon sequestration. Students will prepare research papers and documents addressing issues common to alternative energy and carbon sequestration.

5397 Appellate Civil Rights Clinic - SIEGEL (offered in Spring  2023)
Students in the Appellate Civil Rights Clinic will represent clients and amici in appeals of civil rights claims in federal and state courts. Our appeals will include § 1983 cases arising from law enforcement misconduct and unconstitutional prison conditions; cases alleging discrimination in employment and public accommodations; First Amendment speech and religion clause cases; and others. We will not take criminal appeals or post-conviction petitions. Students will assume responsibility for all aspects of appellate representation, albeit with close faculty supervision. Tasks will include reviewing the trial court record, “big picture” strategizing about appellate themes, conducting legal research, drafting main and reply briefs, editing classmates’ briefs, and presenting oral argument where appropriate. Classroom instruction will teach the essentials of appellate advocacy: using the lower court record, thorough but well-tailored legal research, persuasive writing, close editing, and effective oral argument.

5397 Appellate Civil Rights Clinic - SIEGEL (offered in Fall  2022)
Students in the Appellate Civil Rights Clinic will represent clients and amici in appeals of civil rights claims in federal and state courts. Our appeals will include § 1983 cases arising from law enforcement misconduct and unconstitutional prison conditions; cases alleging discrimination in employment and public accommodations; First Amendment speech and religion clause cases; and others. We will not take criminal appeals or post-conviction petitions. Students will assume responsibility for all aspects of appellate representation, albeit with close faculty supervision. Tasks will include reviewing the trial court record, “big picture” strategizing about appellate themes, conducting legal research, drafting main and reply briefs, editing classmates’ briefs, and presenting oral argument where appropriate. Classroom instruction will teach the essentials of appellate advocacy: using the lower court record, thorough but well-tailored legal research, persuasive writing, close editing, and effective oral argument.

5397 Appellate Civil Rights Clinic - SIEGEL (offered in Spring  2022)
Students in the Appellate Civil Rights Clinic will represent clients and amici in appeals of civil rights claims in federal and state courts. Our appeals will include § 1983 cases arising from law enforcement misconduct and unconstitutional prison conditions; cases alleging discrimination in employment and public accommodations; First Amendment speech and religion clause cases; and others. We will not take criminal appeals or post-conviction petitions. Students will assume responsibility for all aspects of appellate representation, albeit with close faculty supervision. Tasks will include reviewing the trial court record, “big picture” strategizing about appellate themes, conducting legal research, drafting main and reply briefs, editing classmates’ briefs, and presenting oral argument where appropriate. Classroom instruction will teach the essentials of appellate advocacy: using the lower court record, thorough but well-tailored legal research, persuasive writing, close editing, and effective oral argument.

5297 Attorney Communication and Persuasion - LAWRENCE/JONES (offered in SummerMini  2024)
Communication is at the very heart of what we do as lawyers. Knowing how to establish rapport, ask the right questions and present compelling arguments is as important to the transactional lawyer as it is to the trial lawyer. This course helps students become more effective, precise, clear, credible, and persuasive. The course teaches students about the psychological underpinnings of the communication process, identifies how people process information and outlines how to communicate more clearly, powerfully and persuasively in a variety of legal settings.

5397 Blockchain/Cryptocurrency Law - BROWN (offered in Fall  2022)
This course heightens skills and techniques for learning law and demonstrating legal knowledge in [Many believe that blockchain, cryptocurrencies, and NFTs will impact every corner of the economy. This course discusses how current laws address the space and how future laws might address new and unique problems].

5297 Cannabis/Psychedelics Law - ZORN (offered in Spring  2024)
This course will provide an overview of the law relevant to the emerging cannabis and psychedelic industries. Topics for discussion will include constitutional law, criminal law, administrative law, and agriculture laws. We’ll cover developments in cannabis and psychedelic legalization at both the state and federal levels, including Texas. Every week will discuss a new topic.

5497 Civil Justice Clinic I - MARQUEZ, Ryan/KRASNY (offered in Fall  2022)
Students will represent clients in connection with a wide range of Texas civil litigation matters, including family, guardianship, probate, landlord/tenant, deceptive trade practices, real property, bankruptcy, and debt-collection. Representation will include court/trial appearances, mediation, negotiation, document drafting and case investigation. The Clinic has a classroom component that meets for two hours each week over the course of the semester. The classroom component will focus on (a) cultivating students’ civil litigation practice skills, (b) introducing substantive law topics within the Clinic’s practice areas, and (c) reviewing and discussing the Clinic’s active cases. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/m1263f5v0xj9tln/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in this course. If you are accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. For fullest consideration, please apply before course registration opens. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5497 Civil Justice Clinic I - MARQUEZ, Ryan/KRASNY (offered in Spring  2023)
Students will represent clients in connection with a wide range of Texas civil litigation matters, including family, guardianship, probate, landlord/tenant, deceptive trade practices, real property, bankruptcy, and debt-collection. Representation will include court/trial appearances, mediation, negotiation, document drafting and case investigation. The Clinic has a classroom component that meets for two hours each week over the course of the semester. The classroom component will focus on (a) cultivating students’ civil litigation practice skills, (b) introducing substantive law topics within the Clinic’s practice areas, and (c) reviewing and discussing the Clinic’s active cases. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/m1263f5v0xj9tln/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in this course. If you are accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. For fullest consideration, please apply before course registration opens. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5497 Civil Justice Clinic I - MARQUEZ, Ryan/KRASNY (offered in Summer I  2023)
Students will represent clients in connection with a wide range of Texas civil litigation matters, including family, guardianship, probate, landlord/tenant, deceptive trade practices, real property, bankruptcy, and debt-collection. Representation will include court/trial appearances, mediation, negotiation, document drafting and case investigation. The Clinic has a classroom component that meets for two hours each week over the course of the semester. The classroom component will focus on (a) cultivating students’ civil litigation practice skills, (b) introducing substantive law topics within the Clinic’s practice areas, and (c) reviewing and discussing the Clinic’s active cases. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/m1263f5v0xj9tln/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in this course. If you are accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. For fullest consideration, please apply before course registration opens. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5497 Civil Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Summer I  2023)
Students will represent clients in connection with a wide range of Texas civil litigation matters, including family, guardianship, probate, landlord/tenant, deceptive trade practices, real property, bankruptcy, and debt-collection. Representation will include court/trial appearances, mediation, negotiation, document drafting and case investigation. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/m1263f5v0xj9tln/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in this course. If you are accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. For fullest consideration, please apply before course registration opens. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5397 Civil Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Summer I  2023)
Students will represent clients in connection with a wide range of Texas civil litigation matters, including family, guardianship, probate, landlord/tenant, deceptive trade practices, real property, bankruptcy, and debt-collection. Representation will include court/trial appearances, mediation, negotiation, document drafting and case investigation. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/m1263f5v0xj9tln/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in this course. If you are accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. For fullest consideration, please apply before course registration opens. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5297 Civil Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Summer I  2023)
Students will represent clients in connection with a wide range of Texas civil litigation matters, including family, guardianship, probate, landlord/tenant, deceptive trade practices, real property, bankruptcy, and debt-collection. Representation will include court/trial appearances, mediation, negotiation, document drafting and case investigation. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/m1263f5v0xj9tln/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in this course. If you are accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. For fullest consideration, please apply before course registration opens. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5297 Civil Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Spring  2023)
Students will represent clients in connection with a wide range of Texas civil litigation matters, including family, guardianship, probate, landlord/tenant, deceptive trade practices, real property, bankruptcy, and debt-collection. Representation will include court/trial appearances, mediation, negotiation, document drafting and case investigation. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/m1263f5v0xj9tln/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in this course. If you are accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. For fullest consideration, please apply before course registration opens. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5397 Civil Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Spring  2023)
Students will represent clients in connection with a wide range of Texas civil litigation matters, including family, guardianship, probate, landlord/tenant, deceptive trade practices, real property, bankruptcy, and debt-collection. Representation will include court/trial appearances, mediation, negotiation, document drafting and case investigation. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/m1263f5v0xj9tln/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in this course. If you are accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. For fullest consideration, please apply before course registration opens. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5497 Civil Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Spring  2023)
Students will represent clients in connection with a wide range of Texas civil litigation matters, including family, guardianship, probate, landlord/tenant, deceptive trade practices, real property, bankruptcy, and debt-collection. Representation will include court/trial appearances, mediation, negotiation, document drafting and case investigation. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/m1263f5v0xj9tln/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in this course. If you are accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. For fullest consideration, please apply before course registration opens. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5297 Civil Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Fall  2022)
Students will represent clients in connection with a wide range of Texas civil litigation matters, including family, guardianship, probate, landlord/tenant, deceptive trade practices, real property, bankruptcy, and debt-collection. Representation will include court/trial appearances, mediation, negotiation, document drafting and case investigation. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/m1263f5v0xj9tln/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in this course. If you are accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. For fullest consideration, please apply before course registration opens. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5397 Civil Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Fall  2022)
Students will represent clients in connection with a wide range of Texas civil litigation matters, including family, guardianship, probate, landlord/tenant, deceptive trade practices, real property, bankruptcy, and debt-collection. Representation will include court/trial appearances, mediation, negotiation, document drafting and case investigation. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/m1263f5v0xj9tln/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in this course. If you are accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. For fullest consideration, please apply before course registration opens. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5497 Civil Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Fall  2022)
Students will represent clients in connection with a wide range of Texas civil litigation matters, including family, guardianship, probate, landlord/tenant, deceptive trade practices, real property, bankruptcy, and debt-collection. Representation will include court/trial appearances, mediation, negotiation, document drafting and case investigation. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/m1263f5v0xj9tln/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in this course. If you are accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. For fullest consideration, please apply before course registration opens. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5397 Civil Procedure (FLLM Only) - WARREN (offered in Spring  2024)
This course provides an introduction to the civil adjudicative process, primarily that of the federal courts, including jurisdiction, pleading, dispositive motions, discovery, and trial procedures.

5297 Clean Air Act - COOK (offered in Spring  2024)
With a focus on issues EPA is currently wrestling with, this course will examine critical air pollution challenges and the tools the federal Clean Act provides federal and state governments and local communities to use in addressing air pollution. The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments were comprehensive and established numerous timelines and programs for achieving various clean air standards. As time and science has marched on, over three decades later, some problems have been solved, others improved, and yet others are still awaiting an implementable solution. Each class period will explore a particular air quality problem and the associated statutory and regulatory programs designed to address the issue. Among the topics the course will explore include aspects of climate change, regulation of mobile sources, acid rain, environmental justice, and ozone. Readings will mostly come from judicial decisions, filed briefs and relevant articles. No casebook is assigned. See the syllabus for more details.

5397 Climate Intervention Law & Policy - HESTER (offered in Fall  2022)
As efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions continue to fall short of international goals and concerns mount over worsening climate change damages, attention has begun to focus on an emerging set of technologies that seek to directly manipulate the global atmosphere or alter regional ecosystems to offset or prevent climate change itself. These efforts generally involve either carbon dioxide removal from the ambient atmosphere on a massive scale, or solar radiation management to reduce the amount of energy reaching the Earth’s surface. These climate intervention technologies raise novel and fundamental challenges for both international law and domestic regulatory policy. This class will be the first law course in the United States focusing on this new field of law.

5297 Commercial Finance Transactions - RANSOM (offered in Spring  2022)
This course will immerse students in practical business and legal concepts inherent in commercial financing transactions and demonstrate how those issues manifest themselves in the financing documents drafted by lawyers. Students will learn the provisions of financing documents, and, importantly, learn the legal and business issues behind the provisions. The tools and concepts taught in class lectures will be implemented by students in practice through negotiation and drafting of a commercial loan utilizing real world current forms of a syndicated credit agreement and term sheet. This course will provide the basic foundational legal and business concepts related to commercial loan agreements that practicing attorneys wish all first year attorneys were already familiar with.

5397 Constitutional Law ( FLLM ONLY) - JOHNSON (offered in Spring  2024)
This introductory course will cover the text of the United States Constitution, the power of judicial review over federal and state legislation, and the scope of (and limitations on) the federal government’s power via sources such as commerce, spending, taxing, war and enforcement sections of the post-Civil War amendments. It will cover constitutional constraints on the allocation of federal power amongst the executive, legislative and judicial branches. Individual rights guaranteed by the Constitution will also be addressed, including rights to free speech and religious freedom under the first amendment, as well as rights such as due process and equal protection created or incorporated by the 14th amendment. The course will also briefly consider the treatment of Indians, immigrants and territories under the Constitution.

5297 Construction Law - LAPAR (offered in Fall  2022)
The course will provide students with an overview of the general principals of construction law and the issues construction law practitioners navigate in the representation of their construction industry clients. You will learn about issues relating to private and public construction projects such as mechanic’s liens and bond claims, the role of the various parties involved in the construction process (ie, owner/ developer, general contractor, subcontractor, supplier), risk-allocation clauses employed in construction contracts, issues arising during contract performance, and dispute resolution forums.

5397 Consumer Law Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Spring  2022)
This course is a practical course involving representing actual clients with their legal issues. You will be working on cases mainly filed in Justice, County, and District courts or in the pre-litigation phase of a claim. Cases will relate directly to consumer law, including landlord and tenant law, real estate issues, deceptive trade practices, debt collection, bankruptcy, negotiation strategies, and lease drafting. After completing this course, students will have the necessary legal and practical knowledge to represent consumers effectively upon starting to practice law. Regular participation in the clinic is required! You must work 50 hours per course credit hour. There is a weekly staff meeting class that lasts approximately 1 ˝ hours.

5297 Consumer Law Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Spring  2022)
This course is a practical course involving representing actual clients with their legal issues. You will be working on cases filed in Justice, County, and District courts. Most of your cases will relate directly to consumer law, including landlord and tenant law, real estate issues, deceptive trade practices, debt collection, bankruptcy, negotiation strategies, and lease drafting. After completing this course, students will have the necessary legal and practical knowledge to represent consumers effectively upon starting to practice law. Regular participation in the clinic is required! You must work 50 hours per course credit hour. There is a weekly staff meeting class that last approximately 1 ˝ hours. The time of the class will be determined after I receive all of the clinic students’ schedules. In the event that our class needs to be rescheduled, I will give you advance warning by email. This will not happen often, but may happen from time to time. All postponed/cancelled classes will be rescheduled. This is a clinical University of Houston Law Center course. Accordingly, Law Center policy requires the final grade average for the course be 3.20 on a 4.0 scale. Work performance, attendance, and participation, including turning in all assignments, will count toward your final grade. I am available to discuss your cases any time I am here at UHLC. My office is in KH – 213 and my phone number is (713) 743 -2169 (UHLC). If you do not find me in my office, you should feel free to call me at any time or email me regarding questions. My cell phone will be available for you to contact me at any time as well in case I am not on campus. You may call me at any time if you have a problem that cannot wait until regular school hours.

5497 Consumer Law Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Spring  2022)
This course is a practical course involving representing actual clients with their legal issues. You will be working on cases mainly filed in Justice, County, and District courts or in the pre-litigation phase of a claim. Cases will relate directly to consumer law, including landlord and tenant law, real estate issues, deceptive trade practices, debt collection, bankruptcy, negotiation strategies, and lease drafting. After completing this course, students will have the necessary legal and practical knowledge to represent consumers effectively upon starting to practice law. Regular participation in the clinic is required! You must work 50 hours per course credit hour. There is a weekly staff meeting class that lasts approximately 1 ˝ hours.

5197 Consumer Law Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Spring  2022)
This course is a practical course involving representing actual clients with their legal issues. You will be working on cases filed in Justice, County, and District courts. Most of your cases will relate directly to consumer law, including landlord and tenant law, real estate issues, deceptive trade practices, debt collection, bankruptcy, negotiation strategies, and lease drafting. After completing this course, students will have the necessary legal and practical knowledge to represent consumers effectively upon starting to practice law. Regular participation in the clinic is required! You must work 50 hours per course credit hour. There is a weekly staff meeting class that last approximately 1 ˝ hours. The time of the class will be determined after I receive all of the clinic students’ schedules. In the event that our class needs to be rescheduled, I will give you advance warning by email. This will not happen often, but may happen from time to time. All postponed/cancelled classes will be rescheduled. This is a clinical University of Houston Law Center course. Accordingly, Law Center policy requires the final grade average for the course be 3.20 on a 4.0 scale. Work performance, attendance, and participation, including turning in all assignments, will count toward your final grade. I am available to discuss your cases any time I am here at UHLC. My office is in KH – 213 and my phone number is (713) 743 -2169 (UHLC). If you do not find me in my office, you should feel free to call me at any time or email me regarding questions. My cell phone will be available for you to contact me at any time as well in case I am not on campus. You may call me at any time if you have a problem that cannot wait until regular school hours.

5397 Contracts (FLLM Only) - NGUYEN (offered in Spring  2024)
This course examines legally enforceable promises. The topics include contract formation, contract interpretation, the performance of contractual obligations, defenses to breaches of contract, and remedies.

5297 Criminal Defense Clinic II - LOCASCIO/TOUCHSTONE (offered in Fall  2024)
The Criminal Defense Practice Clinic 2 is a hybrid program offered through the UHLC Clinics Program. It consists of a weekly classroom component along with hands-on practical experience handling misdemeanor and felony cases in the Harris County Criminal District Courts and County Criminal Courts at Law. These cases will be handled by the student attorney from initial arraignment of the client to either a plea bargain, dismissal, or trial at the end of the process. The student attorney will be responsible for all aspects of his or her case, including client interviews and updates; legal research of any issues in the case; analysis and evaluation of the State’s evidence; weighing and considering the various options available to the client for case resolution; and, if needed, sitting first chair during a criminal trial if the client so chooses. During the classroom component, a variety of topics will be discussed, including a detailed walkthrough and analysis of the Harris County criminal justice system, law practice management, trial strategies, and more. Students will also be exposed to the many aspects of the criminal justice system, including hearings before a judge, plea negotiations with prosecutors, and interviews with witnesses. Cases will be selected to provide students with a variety of experiences. It should be noted that essentially all court settings begin at 8:30am, 9am, or 9:30am each day depending on the court, if a case is set for a given day. If you have other classes you need to take that are only held in the morning, you will miss out on a significant source of clinic hours. Please set your schedule accordingly. If you have questions regarding this, please feel free to contact Professors Locascio and Touchstone. Text: Required: O’Connor’s Texas Crimes & Consequences, T.B. Todd Dupont II Required: O'Connor's Texas Criminal Offenses & Defenses, Jani Maselli Wood *If you have the required books from previous semesters/years, those can be used for Clinic 2*

5397 Criminal Defense Clinic II - LOCASCIO/TOUCHSTONE (offered in Fall  2024)
The Criminal Defense Practice Clinic 2 is a hybrid program offered through the UHLC Clinics Program. It consists of a weekly classroom component along with hands-on practical experience handling misdemeanor and felony cases in the Harris County Criminal District Courts and County Criminal Courts at Law. These cases will be handled by the student attorney from initial arraignment of the client to either a plea bargain, dismissal, or trial at the end of the process. The student attorney will be responsible for all aspects of his or her case, including client interviews and updates; legal research of any issues in the case; analysis and evaluation of the State’s evidence; weighing and considering the various options available to the client for case resolution; and, if needed, sitting first chair during a criminal trial if the client so chooses. During the classroom component, a variety of topics will be discussed, including a detailed walkthrough and analysis of the Harris County criminal justice system, law practice management, trial strategies, and more. Students will also be exposed to the many aspects of the criminal justice system, including hearings before a judge, plea negotiations with prosecutors, and interviews with witnesses. Cases will be selected to provide students with a variety of experiences. It should be noted that essentially all court settings begin at 8:30am, 9am, or 9:30am each day depending on the court, if a case is set for a given day. If you have other classes you need to take that are only held in the morning, you will miss out on a significant source of clinic hours. Please set your schedule accordingly. If you have questions regarding this, please feel free to contact Professors Locascio and Touchstone. Text: Required: O’Connor’s Texas Crimes & Consequences, T.B. Todd Dupont II Required: O'Connor's Texas Criminal Offenses & Defenses, Jani Maselli Wood *If you have the required books from previous semesters/years, those can be used for Clinic 2*Locascio and Touchstone.

5297 Criminal Sentencing Law and Policy - MARTIN (offered in Spring  2024)
The purpose of this course is to examine the law and policy of criminal sentencing. The course will explore why society punishes; who holds the power to set sentences (the social institutions); what elements factor into sentencing decisions (offense and offender characteristics); and how sentencing and punishment decisions are made (procedure and proof). The course will also explore the typical outcomes of the sentence decision, including the most expensive and visible outcome: imprisonment. Finally, the course will consider sentencing-review doctrines, including new laws and advocacy surrounding “second look” sentencing mechanisms, and the role of executive clemency.

5297 Criminal Sentencing Law and Policy - MARTIN (offered in Spring  2023)
The purpose of this course is to examine the law and policy of criminal sentencing. The course will explore why society punishes; who holds the power to set sentences (the social institutions); what elements factor into sentencing decisions (offense and offender characteristics); and how sentencing and punishment decisions are made (procedure and proof). The course will also explore the typical outcomes of the sentence decision, including the most expensive and visible outcome: imprisonment. Finally, the course will consider sentencing-review doctrines, including new laws and advocacy surrounding “second look” sentencing mechanisms, and the role of executive clemency.

5297 Death and Taxes - BORRETT/CORORVE (offered in Spring  2024)
Postmortem Estate Planning: Covers issues associated with estate administration with a goal toward minimization of income and estate taxes. Covers the estate tax system generally, income taxation of estates and planning opportunities associated therewith, issues associated with funding of pecuniary and residual bequests, disclaimers, special use valuation, and estate tax deferral techniques. Examines the use of Trusts and Partnerships in removing assets from exposure to estate tax and distribution and release agreements. Course uses material developed by the instructor, primarily from current advance estate planning and probate seminar material.

5297 E-Health - RIVERA (offered in Spring  2022)
Virtual Health, Telehealth, Artificial-Intelligence-Driven-Care, Healthcare Data Analytics Systems, are all descriptors of healthcare technology delivery systems and platforms: together, eHealth. This course will arm students with the knowledge, skills, and resources needed to approach legal solutions to eHealth challenges.

5297 Education Rights Clinic - DOW,KATYA (offered in Spring  2022)
Houston Independent School District is the 7th largest school district in the United States, serving over 214,000 students. Combined, Houston-area schools serve nearly 1,000,000 students. The-school-to-prison pipeline is a phenomenon by which students are pushed out of schools and into the juvenile or criminal justice systems. The Education Rights Clinic aims to disrupt the school-to-prison pipeline in the Houston area by 1) providing community outreach in the form of know-your-rights presentations to young people and their families, and 2) providing direct representation to middle and high school students in school disciplinary proceedings. Through direct representation, law students will have the opportunity to interview clients, investigate facts, create a case plan, conduct legal research, and represent clients directly in school disciplinary proceedings. Depending on the case, this may include a trial-like administrative proceeding in front of a school board with timed opening statements, responses to opposing counsel, and closing statements.

5297 Employee Benefits Plans & Compensation - BENSKIN/WINSTON (offered in Spring  2022)
The laws governing employee benefits and executive compensation are ever-changing and of interest to employers, employees and law makers. Practitioners in this area can be found at big law firms, family law firms, insurance companies, banks, in-house counsel, unions and government. This 2-hour course provides a basic overview of the specialized employee benefit plans (such as 401(k) plans, pension plans and health and welfare benefit plans) governed by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (“ERISA”), and the applicable provisions under the Internal Revenue Code (“Code”). This course also will review the taxation under the Code of executive compensation arrangements, such as non-qualified deferred compensation plans, stock options and other equity plans. Students will gain a historical perspective of ERISA’s origins to learn how the need for federal action came about and lean about more recent legislative actions in this area, such as Obamacare, along with pertinent case law. The course will focus on the ERISA and tax aspects of employee benefits and executive compensation plans and arrangement from both the employer and employee perspectives. The goal of the course is to convey a practical understanding of how ERISA and the Code impact employee benefits that are provided by employers to employees!

5297 Energy Taxation - MATLOCK (offered in Fall  2022)
The course will focus on the unique U.S. federal income tax aspects of (and tax planning and tax structuring related to) energy transition related investments (such as carbon capture use and sequestration), renewable and alternative energy (such as wind and solar), as well as each of the traditional energy sectors (including mining and mining and metals, power and utilities, and oil and gas).

5297 Energy Taxation - MATLOCK (offered in Spring  2024)
The course will focus on the unique U.S. federal income tax aspects of (and tax planning and tax structuring related to) energy transition related investments (such as carbon capture use and sequestration), renewable and alternative energy (such as wind and solar), as well as each of the traditional energy sectors (including mining and mining and metals, power and utilities, and oil and gas).

5297 Energy Transition Policy - PRASAD (offered in Fall  2024)
This course will provide a practical/hands-on understanding of key concepts for law students (JD and LLM) aspiring to practice in the fields of energy and/or climate policy. Topics will be relevant for those planning to practice law exclusively in the United States as well as those practicing overseas or having international clients.

5397 Entertainment Law Clinic - ALONSO/BARKS (offered in Spring  2023)
The Entertainment Law Clinic is an advanced entertainment law course for students who have completed the prerequisite substantive Entertainment Law course and seek practical experience in transactional and administrative entertainment practice. Students will represent clients in various entertainment fields, including music, film and television, dance, and art, as well as small businesses and non-profits operating in these fields. Students will principally focus on trademark and copyright prosecution and counseling, contract drafting and negotiation, royalty stream creation and retention.

5397 Entertainment Law Clinic - ALONSO/BARKS (offered in Fall  2023)
The Entertainment Law Clinic is an advanced entertainment law course for students who have completed the prerequisite substantive Entertainment Law course and seek practical experience in transactional and administrative entertainment practice. Students will represent clients in various entertainment fields, including music, film and television, dance, and art, as well as small businesses and non-profits operating in these fields. Students will principally focus on trademark and copyright prosecution and counseling, contract drafting and negotiation, royalty stream creation and retention.

5397 Entertainment Law Clinic - ALONSO/BARKS (offered in Spring  2022)
The Entertainment Law Clinic is an advanced entertainment law course for students who have completed the prerequisite substantive Entertainment Law course and seek practical experience in transactional and administrative entertainment practice. Students will represent clients in various entertainment fields, including music, film and television, dance, and art, as well as small businesses and non-profits operating in these fields. Students will principally focus on trademark and copyright prosecution and counseling, contract drafting and negotiation, royalty stream creation and retention.

5397 Entertainment Law Clinic - BARKS (offered in Summer I  2022)
The Entertainment Law Clinic is an advanced entertainment law course for students who have completed the prerequisite substantive Entertainment Law course and seek practical experience in transactional and administrative entertainment practice. Students will represent clients in various entertainment fields, including music, film and television, dance, and art, as well as small businesses and non-profits operating in these fields. Students will principally focus on trademark and copyright prosecution and counseling, contract drafting and negotiation, royalty stream creation and retention.

5397 Entertainment Law Clinic - ALONSO/BARKS (offered in Fall  2022)
The Entertainment Law Clinic is an advanced entertainment law course for students who have completed the prerequisite substantive Entertainment Law course and seek practical experience in transactional and administrative entertainment practice. Students will represent clients in various entertainment fields, including music, film and television, dance, and art, as well as small businesses and non-profits operating in these fields. Students will principally focus on trademark and copyright prosecution and counseling, contract drafting and negotiation, royalty stream creation and retention.

5397 Entertainment Law Clinic II - ALONSO/BARKS (offered in Fall  2023)
The Entertainment Law Clinic is an advanced entertainment law course for students who want to further expand their practical skills in transactional and administrative entertainment practice. Students, having successfully completed the Entertainment Law Clinic I will continue representing clients in various entertainment fields, including music, film and television, dance, and the visual arts. The Entertainment Law Clinic I classroom component will be supplanted by a semester-long case study of litigation in a relevant field, including copyright, trademark, right of publicity or NIL, or entertainment contracts. Students will be expected to develop strategies, analyze legal theories, and critically assess defensive and prosecutorial postures. Students must apply to the clinic by submitting an online application located at http://law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in the clinic via PeopleSoft. If your application is accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5297 Entertainment Law Clinic II - ALONSO/BARKS (offered in Fall  2023)
The Entertainment Law Clinic is an advanced entertainment law course for students who want to further expand their practical skills in transactional and administrative entertainment practice. Students, having successfully completed the Entertainment Law Clinic I will continue representing clients in various entertainment fields, including music, film and television, dance, and the visual arts. The Entertainment Law Clinic II classroom component will be supplanted by a semester-long case study of litigation in a relevant field, including copyright, trademark, right of publicity or NIL, or entertainment contracts. Students will be expected to develop strategies, analyze legal theories, and critically assess defensive and prosecutorial postures. Students must apply to the clinic by submitting an online application located at http://law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in the clinic via PeopleSoft. If your application is accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5297 Entertainment Law Clinic II - BARKS/RODGERS (offered in Spring  2024)
The Entertainment Law Clinic is an advanced entertainment law course for students who want to further expand their practical skills in transactional and administrative entertainment practice. Students, having successfully completed the Entertainment Law Clinic I will continue representing clients in various entertainment fields, including music, film and television, dance, and the visual arts. The Entertainment Law Clinic I classroom component will be supplanted by a semester-long case study of litigation in a relevant field, including copyright, trademark, right of publicity or NIL, or entertainment contracts. Students will be expected to develop strategies, analyze legal theories, and critically assess defensive and prosecutorial postures. Students must apply to the clinic by submitting an online application located at http://law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in the clinic via PeopleSoft. If your application is accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5397 Entertainment Law Clinic II - BARKS/RODGERS (offered in Spring  2024)
The Entertainment Law Clinic is an advanced entertainment law course for students who want to further expand their practical skills in transactional and administrative entertainment practice. Students, having successfully completed the Entertainment Law Clinic I will continue representing clients in various entertainment fields, including music, film and television, dance, and the visual arts. The Entertainment Law Clinic I classroom component will be supplanted by a semester-long case study of litigation in a relevant field, including copyright, trademark, right of publicity or NIL, or entertainment contracts. Students will be expected to develop strategies, analyze legal theories, and critically assess defensive and prosecutorial postures. Students must apply to the clinic by submitting an online application located at http://law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in the clinic via PeopleSoft. If your application is accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5397 Entertainment Law Clinic II - BARKS/RODGERS (offered in Summer I  2024)
The Entertainment Law Clinic is an advanced entertainment law course for students who want to further expand their practical skills in transactional and administrative entertainment practice. Students, having successfully completed the Entertainment Law Clinic I will continue representing clients in various entertainment fields, including music, film and television, dance, and the visual arts. The Entertainment Law Clinic I classroom component will be supplanted by a semester-long case study of litigation in a relevant field, including copyright, trademark, right of publicity or NIL, or entertainment contracts. Students will be expected to develop strategies, analyze legal theories, and critically assess defensive and prosecutorial postures. Students must apply to the clinic by submitting an online application located at http://law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in the clinic via PeopleSoft. If your application is accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5297 Entrepreneurship Law and Venture Capital Finance - LUMPKIN (offered in Fall  2023)
This course is designed to introduce students to the unique challenges entrepreneurs face and related legal considerations. The course approach is practical and will encourage students to think critically about the tension between risk and return when advising start-ups and growth-stage companies. Topics will include preparation for an initial investment, due diligence, entity governance, equity compensation, founders agreements and vesting, intellectual property rights, the fundraising process, basic terms negotiations, convertible debt and future equity instruments, venture capital-style equity investments, and exit transactions. The objective is to introduce students to the legal issues most frequently encountered by high-growth early stage companies, and purchasers of equity in those companies, throughout the fundraising cycles. The course will seek to expose students to the skills transactional lawyers need when advising entrepreneurial ventures and their investors.

5297 Entrepreneurship Law and Venture Capital Finance - LUMPKIN (offered in Spring  2022)
This course is designed to introduce students to the unique challenges entrepreneurs face and related legal considerations. The course approach is practical and will encourage students to think critically about the tension between risk and return when advising start-ups and growth-stage companies. Topics will include preparation for an initial investment, due diligence, entity governance, equity compensation, founders agreements and vesting, intellectual property rights, the fundraising process, basic terms negotiations, convertible debt and future equity instruments, venture capital-style equity investments, and exit transactions. The objective is to introduce students to the legal issues most frequently encountered by high-growth early stage companies, and purchasers of equity in those companies, throughout the fundraising cycles. The course will seek to expose students to the skills transactional lawyers need when advising entrepreneurial ventures and their investors.

5397 Environmental Appellate Advocacy - HESTER (offered in Spring  2024)
This course offers a comprehensive introduction to appellate advocacy through participation in cases important to the development of environmental law. We will identify emerging issues through new cases in federal and state appellate courts, including the U.S. Supreme Court, that would play critical roles in the effective and comprehensive application of federal and state environmental law. Some of these issues include standing, representation of untraditional plaintiffs, scope of judicial relief, administrative law questions important to the functioning of environmental agencies, and key issues of statutory interpretive doctrine. This course will use a combination of lectures, class discussions, in-class drafting sessions, and case selection reviews. Students will review dockets from each federal circuit and the U.S. Supreme Court to identify new cases and appeals that pose important issues. Each student may assist in preparation of briefs on those selected cases, and the class will include moot presentations or mock oral arguments related to pending disputes.

5397 FCPA (Foreign Corrupt Practices Act) - KOEHLER (offered in Fall  2023)
The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) is a top legal and compliance concern for business organizations – both public and private and across a variety of industry sectors – doing business in the global marketplace. This online course is an in-depth study of the FCPA, FCPA enforcement, FCPA compliance, and related legal and policy issues. You will learn of the FCPA’s modern era and in doing so will dissect legal authority such as the FCPA statutory text, legislative history and judicial decisions as well as non-legal sources of information such as resolved FCPA enforcement actions and enforcement agency guidance.

5297 Financial Products Taxation - GUPTA (offered in Spring  2022)
The course will cover an understanding of how financial products are sought to be used (or abused) to “optimize” the tax characteristics of income—by recasting, for example, returns on equity as those on debt, or fixed returns as contingent returns, or ordinary income as capital gains, or domestic-source income as foreign-source, and so on.

5197 George Floyd and Its Aftermath: Equal Justice & Law - DUNCAN (offered in Spring  2022)
This intersession course is a team-taught one-credit course designed to provide a unique opportunity to consider equal justice and other legal issues implicated by the killing of George Floyd and other recent current events. Instructors include Dean Baynes and Profs. Meredith Duncan, Daniel Morales, Ellen Marrus David Dow, Gina Warren, and Jessica Mantel. It will meet daily from 9:30 a.m. to noon, with a short break mid- class.

5297 Global Health Law - DIAMOND (offered in Spring  2022)
Global health law has emerged as a field that sits at the timely intersection of public health and international law. More specifically, it is defined by the norms, processes, institutions, and actors that shape global governance for health. This course introduces students to both the theory and practice of global health law, with an emphasis on how the law can be a tool to respond to the most urgent health threats of our time. This course first provides an overview of the normative foundation of global health law, encompassing the adjacent fields of both global health ethics and global justice.

5297 Global Health Law - DIAMOND (offered in Spring  2024)
Global health law has emerged as a field that sits at the timely intersection of public health and international law. More specifically, it is defined by the norms, processes, institutions, and actors that shape global governance for health. This course introduces students to both the theory and practice of global health law, with an emphasis on how the law can be a tool to respond to the most urgent health threats of our time. This course first provides an overview of the normative foundation of global health law, encompassing the adjacent fields of both global health ethics and global justice.

5297 Health Care Institutions - HEBBAR (offered in Fall  2024)
This core health law course is an introductory tour of Texas/federal laws governing health-sector businesses, which together account for 18% U.S. Gross Domestic Product. The course covers traditional 20th-century institutions such as hospitals, but the main focus is on academic medical centers, which provide patient care, perform research, and train the next generation of health professionals. contract research organizations; health data exchanges; and management and informational services). Academic Medical Centers are a large part of the health industry and students entering the health law workforce of today need to know the laws that affect them and the unresolved policy issues they raise. Students who choose to practice health law, will inevitably encounter and advise academic medical centers in some capacity, whether serving as in-house counsel or engaged as outside counsel on a specific project. This year’s course will include multiple visits from, and opportunities for students to have close interactions with, practicing attorneys—who work in major area academic medical centers. They will guide students in practical problem-solving discussions of real-world legal issues related to the substantive law topics covered in the course and offer insights on how to get and build a career working for or representing academic medical centers as clients.

5297 Health Care Institutions - EWER (offered in Spring  2023)
This core health law course is an introductory tour of Texas/federal laws governing health-sector businesses, which together account for 18% U.S. Gross Domestic Product. The course covers traditional 20th-century institutions such as hospitals, but the main focus is on the expanding array of new players that supply innovative products and services (clinical laboratories; biobanks; academic medical centers, which conduct research as well as providing patient care; contract research organizations; health data exchanges; and management and informational services). These latter entities are a vibrant and growing part of the health industry and students entering the health law workforce of today need to know the laws that affect them and the unresolved policy issues they raise. This year’s course will include multiple visits from, and opportunities for students to have close interactions with, practicing attorneys—UH Law Center alums—who work in major area academic medical centers. They will guide students in practical problem-solving discussions of real-world legal issues related to the substantive law topics covered in the course and offer insights on how to get and build a career working for or representing academic medical centers as clients.

5697 Immigration Clinic I - CABOT (offered in Fall  2023)
Students will represent clients with asylum cases—people who are seeking protection in the U.S. because they fear persecution at home on the basis of their race, religion, nationality, political opinion, or membership in another protected group like a sexual or gender minority. Students, with the guidance of professors, will be responsible for every aspect of representation including client interviewing and counseling, fact investigation and development, document and application drafting, working with expert witnesses, and trial advocacy. The Clinic has a classroom component that meets for three hours each week over the course of the semester. The classroom component will focus on (a) developing students’ lawyering skills, (b) introducing substantive law topics within the Clinic’s practice areas, and (c) reviewing and discussing the Clinic’s active cases. Students will also meet with their supervisor weekly at a mutually convenient time. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/m1263f5v0xj9tln/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in this course. If you are accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. For fullest consideration, please apply before course registration opens

5697 Immigration Clinic I - CABOT (offered in Spring  2024)
As a student in this clinic, you will represent an asylum seeker from the first client interview, all the way through to the hearing in front of an immigration judge. You will be your client’s attorney and therefore responsible for all aspects of the case—client interviewing and counseling, fact investigation and development, working with expert witnesses, legal research and drafting documents, negotiations, and trial advocacy. You will work in pairs or groups of three under the supervision of one of the professors. In addition to the work you do on your client’s case, known as fieldwork, there is a classroom component to the clinic. The class will meet twice a week and will include learning lawyering skills, substantive law, procedural rules, and ethical considerations, practicing new skills through simulation, workshopping written product, and participating in case rounds. Case rounds are group problem solving sessions where a team presents a problem to the class and the class helps the team to examine the problem, consider their own goals, and brainstorm solutions.

5397 In-House Counsel Fundamentals - BOOTH,K (offered in Spring  2023)
This course will give students insight into the complex function of in-house counsel and provide the basic tools needed to succeed in an in-house role. The course will focus on developing skills in risk management, negotiation, corporate communications, commercial contracts, compliance, ethics, and gaining the trust of your organization. Students will also see how basic legal principles regarding attorney-client privilege, contract formation, and corporate governance are used on an everyday basis. Course instruction will take students through their first year as in-house counsel at MiniPrivateCo and MegaPublicCo using case studies based on real-world examples. This course will benefit all students interested in a legal career advising businesses, whether it be as in-house or outside counsel.

5397 In-House Counsel Fundamentals - BOOTH,K/HOLMES (offered in Spring  2024)
This course will give students insight into the complex function of in-house counsel and provide the basic tools needed to succeed in an in-house role. The course will focus on developing skills in risk management, negotiation, corporate communications, commercial contracts, compliance, ethics, litigation management at all stages, advising and counseling on common employment issues, and gaining the trust of your organization. Students will also see how basic legal principles regarding attorney-client privilege, contract formation, and corporate governance are used on an everyday basis. Course instruction will take students through their first year as in-house counsel at MiniPrivateCo and MegaPublicCo using case studies based on real-world examples. This course will benefit all students interested in a legal career advising businesses, whether it be as in-house or outside counsel.

5297 Intermediate Legal Research - DRAKE (offered in Spring  2024)
Building on the legal research process introduced in Lawyering Skills and Strategies, Intermediate Legal Research focuses on using print and electronic research tools to find and analyze legal information. Students will apply their research and analysis skills to simulated research problems from clients and build on their basic techniques for finding and analyzing legal information in the major electronic databases and cost-effective alternatives. Students will also be introduced to research tools and strategies not included in the LSS curriculum, including regulatory research, legislative history research, and more.

5297 Intermediate Legal Research - DRAKE (offered in Spring  2024)
Building on the legal research process introduced in Lawyering Skills and Strategies, Intermediate Legal Research focuses on using print and electronic research tools to find and analyze legal information. Students will apply their research and analysis skills to simulated research problems from clients and build on their basic techniques for finding and analyzing legal information in the major electronic databases and cost-effective alternatives. Students will also be introduced to research tools and strategies not included in the LSS curriculum, including regulatory research, legislative history research, and more.

5297 Intermediate Legal Research - DRAKE (offered in Spring  2023)
Building on the legal research process introduced in Lawyering Skills and Strategies, Intermediate Legal Research focuses on using print and electronic research tools to find and analyze legal information. Students will apply their research and analysis skills to simulated research problems from clients and build on their basic techniques for finding and analyzing legal information in the major electronic databases and cost-effective alternatives. Students will also be introduced to research tools and strategies not included in the LSS curriculum, including regulatory research, legislative history research, and more.

5297 Intermediate Legal Research - WATSON (offered in Fall  2023)
Building on the legal research process introduced in Lawyering Skills and Strategies, Intermediate Legal Research focuses on using print and electronic research tools to find and analyze legal information. Students will apply their research and analysis skills to simulated research problems from clients and build on their basic techniques for finding and analyzing legal information in the major electronic databases and cost-effective alternatives. Students will also be introduced to research tools and strategies not included in the LSS curriculum, including regulatory research, legislative history research, and more.

5297 Intermediate Legal Research - WATSON (offered in Fall  2023)
Building on the legal research process introduced in Lawyering Skills and Strategies, Intermediate Legal Research focuses on using print and electronic research tools to find and analyze legal information. Students will apply their research and analysis skills to simulated research problems from clients and build on their basic techniques for finding and analyzing legal information in the major electronic databases and cost-effective alternatives. Students will also be introduced to research tools and strategies not included in the LSS curriculum, including regulatory research, legislative history research, and more.

5297 Intermediate Legal Research - WATSON (offered in Fall  2023)
Building on the legal research process introduced in Lawyering Skills and Strategies, Intermediate Legal Research focuses on using print and electronic research tools to find and analyze legal information. Students will apply their research and analysis skills to simulated research problems from clients and build on their basic techniques for finding and analyzing legal information in the major electronic databases and cost-effective alternatives. Students will also be introduced to research tools and strategies not included in the LSS curriculum, including regulatory research, legislative history research, and more.

5297 International Corporate Compliance - McCONNELL/BAKER (offered in Spring  2022)
Corporate compliance, one of the fastest growing markets for legal services, addresses the problems of organizations struggling to manage risk ranging from corruption to data privacy. This class will teach you the process involved in addressing compliance risk and how to integrate compliance processes into a business. We will discuss a number of substantive compliance areas, but the goal of the class is to teach you how to develop a risk based approach to solve compliance problems.

5397 Investment Management & Reg - DAVIDSON (offered in Fall  2024)
With approximately $30 trillion in assets under management registered investment companies (commonly referred to as mutual funds and now ETFs) perform a significant role in raising and deploying capital within the U.S. financial system. This course is designed to familiarize students with the legal and regulatory framework of the investment management industry. The course gives primary emphasis to applicable federal securities law requirements found in the Investment Company Act of 1940 and the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The principal legal topics covered include: the definition of “investment company” and “investment adviser”, prohibitions and regulations relating to conflicts of interest, disclosure obligations of investment companies, and the governance of such entities. The course also examines the role of the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) in regulating the investment management industry and the responsibility of legal counsel in practicing before the SEC.

5297 Land Use - ZALE (offered in Spring  2022)
This course examines land use law and policy. Land is one of the most fundamental and valuable resources to individuals and communities, and a wide array of public regulation as well as private controls shape the use and development of land. Specific topics that will be covered in the course include planning, zoning, subdivision regulation, aesthetic and historic preservation, regulatory takings, inclusionary housing, environmental review, private covenants, and the role of markets. Throughout our study of these issues, we will consider competing ideas about how, when, and why land use should be regulated and the comparative advantages and disadvantages of various land uses controls. The objectives of this course are to: (1) gain a foundation in the substantive law of the subject matter; (2) apply critical legal thinking to identify and understand constitutional, statutory, and regulatory constraints applicable to the subject matter; (3) recognize the policy implications and ethical questions related to the subject matter; and (4) integrate the doctrinal study of the subject matter with the analytical and practical skills necessary to the practice of law. Classes will be a combination of lecture and interactive discussion.

5397 Large Language Models for Lawyers - CHANDLER (offered in Fall  2024)
Introducing an exciting new course on how large language models are transforming the legal field. This hands-on course will provide students with practical experience using AI tools like ChatGPT to enhance legal research, drafting, and litigation skills. Through workshops and simulations, students will learn how to leverage these powerful models to work more efficiently and creatively both in law school and legal practice. The course covers the leading AI applications in legal tech, discusses ethical considerations, and teaches the basic math and programming concepts behind neural networks. The course culminates in final projects where students demonstrate mastery of legal AI. With expert guest lecturers and a focus on real-world applications, this course will equip students to be at the forefront of the AI revolution in law.

5397 Large Language Models for Lawyers - CHANDLER (offered in Spring  2024)
Introducing an exciting new course on how large language models are transforming the legal field. This hands-on course will provide students with practical experience using AI tools like ChatGPT to enhance legal research, drafting, and litigation skills. Through workshops and simulations, students will learn how to leverage these powerful models to work more efficiently and creatively both in law school and legal practice. The course covers the leading AI applications in legal tech, discusses ethical considerations, and teaches the basic math and programming concepts behind neural networks. The course culminates in final projects where students demonstrate mastery of legal AI. With expert guest lecturers and a focus on real-world applications, this course will equip students to be at the forefront of the AI revolution in law.

5297 Law and Religion - SEILER (offered in Spring  2022)
This course explores the Free Exercise and Establishment Clauses of the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, using the leading textbook in the field (McConnell, Garvey and Berg, 4th edition), as well as some supplementary readings. Students will engage in an in-depth study of these clauses, as well as other federal and state laws concerning religious liberty. The First Amendment reflects a particular concern for “religion,” but the meaning of religion, its legal treatment, and the limits of religious expression have been debated. This course explores those debates through the doctrinal, historical and theoretical dimensions of the First Amendment, paying particular attention to the case law that has developed around these clauses. We will review the protections for religion in the workplace provided by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In addition to reviewing major decisions by the United States Supreme Court on the Free Exercise and Establishment Clauses, students will engage in materials designed to keep students up to date on the continual evolution of this area of law.

5297 Lawyers as Leaders - GRATZ (offered in Spring  2023)
Throughout history, lawyers have played critical leadership roles in both the public and private sector. In every aspect of American society, lawyers lead and actively serve in leadership capacities in their communities and the legal profession. While leadership training is part of the fabric of law school, specific emphasis and training is important and helpful to adequately equip our graduates with the leadership skills needed in this increasingly-complex and ever-changing professional environment. Recent studies show that an ever-increasing number of employers are seeking graduates with leadership skillsets. Topics will include leadership styles and strategies, personality assessments, public service and professional responsibilities, and leadership opportunities for lawyers. Using a variety of study methods, students will discuss leadership lessons learned by experienced leaders through challenging circumstances. Using introspective tools and team-building exercises, students will boost strengths and minimize weaknesses to better equip them for their future.

5297 Lawyers as Leaders - GRATZ (offered in Spring  2024)
Throughout history, lawyers have played critical leadership roles in both the public and private sector. In every aspect of American society, lawyers lead and actively serve in leadership capacities in their communities and the legal profession. While leadership training is part of the fabric of law school, specific emphasis and training is important and helpful to adequately equip our graduates with the leadership skills needed in this increasingly-complex and ever-changing professional environment. Recent studies show that an ever-increasing number of employers are seeking graduates with leadership skillsets. Topics will include leadership styles and strategies, personality assessments, public service and professional responsibilities, and leadership opportunities for lawyers. Using a variety of study methods, students will discuss leadership lessons learned by experienced leaders through challenging circumstances. Using introspective tools and team-building exercises, students will boost strengths and minimize weaknesses to better equip them for their future.

5197 Legal Methods - HEARD (offered in Spring  2024)
This listing is a non-operational placeholder. Students cannot directly register for this course. General information about this course is available here: [_link forthcoming_]

5197 Legal Methods - REED (offered in Spring  2024)
This listing is a non-operational placeholder. Students cannot directly register for this course. General information about this course is available here: [_link forthcoming_]

5197 Legal Methods - BREM (offered in Spring  2024)
This listing is a non-operational placeholder. Students cannot directly register for this course. General information about this course is available here: [_link forthcoming_]

5197 Legal Methods - GOMEZ (offered in Spring  2024)
This listing is a non-operational placeholder. Students cannot directly register for this course. General information about this course is available here: [_link forthcoming_]

5197 Legal Methods - SIMMONS (offered in Spring  2024)
This listing is a non-operational placeholder. Students cannot directly register for this course. General information about this course is available here: [_link forthcoming_]

5197 Legal Methods - DAVIS (offered in Spring  2024)
This listing is a non-operational placeholder. Students cannot directly register for this course. General information about this course is available here: [_link forthcoming_]

5197 Legal Methods - HASTINGS (offered in Spring  2024)
This listing is a non-operational placeholder. Students cannot directly register for this course. General information about this course is available here: [_link forthcoming_]

5197 Legal Methods - SIMMONS (offered in Fall  2023)
This listing is a non-operational placeholder. Students cannot directly register for this course. General information about this course is available here: [_link forthcoming_]

5397 Legal Writing - DAVIS (offered in Fall  2023)
This is a course in two parts: As a preliminary matter, this course focuses on an introduction to the American legal education system and the skills a student must possess to succeed. The curriculum will include instruction in the case method of the study of law in the United States, including briefing a case and recitation; the importance of outlining as a method of exam preparation; and actual exam writing skills, especially if a majority of students are more familiar with an oral exam tradition. Then this course shifts focus to a skills-based examination of the U.S. legal system. This curriculum will be problem-based, using fact-pattern simulations to develop oral communication, legal writing, research, and analysis skills essential to practice in the U.S. legal system.

5397 Legal Writing - SIMMONS (offered in Fall  2023)
This is a course in two parts: As a preliminary matter, this course focuses on an introduction to the American legal education system and the skills a student must possess to succeed. The curriculum will include instruction in the case method of the study of law in the United States, including briefing a case and recitation; the importance of outlining as a method of exam preparation; and actual exam writing skills, especially if a majority of students are more familiar with an oral exam tradition. Then this course shifts focus to a skills-based examination of the U.S. legal system. This curriculum will be problem-based, using fact-pattern simulations to develop oral communication, legal writing, research, and analysis skills essential to practice in the U.S. legal system.

5397 Mediation Advocacy: Representing Clients in Mediation - MOULTON (offered in Spring  2023)
Mediation Advocacy is a simulation, skills-based class that will teach you the art and skill of utilizing mediation to negotiate disputes. Most lawsuits settle and, in Harris County, most courts require participation in mediation before setting a case for trial. This course will: (1) expose students to mediation practice, early dispute resolution (EDR), and general negotiation techniques; and (2) provide students with the skills needed to represent clients effectively in mediation. Students will participate in at least one mock mediation and will learn from experienced mediators, practicing lawyers, and entrepreneurs who will participate as guest speakers. Professor Moulton is also a trial lawyer with over 30 years experience.

5397 Mediation Advocacy: Representing Clients in Mediation - MOULTON (offered in Spring  2022)
Mediation Advocacy is a simulation, skills-based class that will teach you the art and skill of utilizing mediation to negotiate disputes. Most lawsuits settle and, in Harris County, most courts require participation in mediation before setting a case for trial. This course will: (1) expose students to mediation practice, early dispute resolution (EDR), and general negotiation techniques; and (2) provide students with the skills needed to represent clients effectively in mediation. Students will participate in at least one mock mediation and will learn from experienced mediators, practicing lawyers, and entrepreneurs who will participate as guest speakers. Professor Moulton is also a trial lawyer with over 30 years experience.

5397 Mediation Advocacy: Representing Clients in Mediation - MOULTON/HAWASH (offered in Spring  2024)
Mediation Advocacy is a simulation, skills-based class that will teach you the art and skill of utilizing mediation to negotiate disputes. Most lawsuits settle and, in Harris County, most courts require participation in mediation before setting a case for trial. This course will: (1) expose students to mediation practice, early dispute resolution (EDR), and general negotiation techniques; and (2) provide students with the skills needed to represent clients effectively in mediation. Students will participate in at least one mock mediation and will learn from experienced mediators, practicing lawyers, and entrepreneurs who will participate as guest speakers. Professor Moulton is also a trial lawyer with over 30 years experience.

5397 Mediation Clinic I - WILLIS (offered in Summer I  2024)
Mediation Clinic students add to their list of lawyering skills learned prior to graduation by mediating real cases in Justice Courts, the Better Business Bureau, the EEOC, and for parties who have been ordered to mediate by local judges. Students will mediate 2-3 mediations per week throughout the semester. For more information regarding the Mediation Clinic contact Tasha Willis, tlwillis@central.uh.edu. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at http://www.law.uh.edu/clinic/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5397 Mediation Clinic I - WILLIS (offered in Fall  2023)
Mediation Clinic students add to their list of lawyering skills learned prior to graduation by mediating real cases in Justice Courts, the Better Business Bureau, the EEOC, and for parties who have been ordered to mediate by local judges. Students will mediate 2-3 mediations per week throughout the semester. For more information regarding the Mediation Clinic contact Tasha Willis, tlwillis@central.uh.edu. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at http://www.law.uh.edu/clinic/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5397 Mediation Clinic I - WILLIS (offered in Spring  2024)
Mediation Clinic students add to their list of lawyering skills learned prior to graduation by mediating real cases in Justice Courts, the Better Business Bureau, the EEOC, and for parties who have been ordered to mediate by local judges. Students will mediate 2-3 mediations per week throughout the semester. For more information regarding the Mediation Clinic contact Tasha Willis, tlwillis@central.uh.edu. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at http://www.law.uh.edu/clinic/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5297 Mediation Clinic II - WILLIS (offered in Spring  2024)
Mediation Clinic students add to their list of lawyering skills learned prior to graduation by mediating real cases in Justice Courts, the Better Business Bureau, the EEOC, and for parties who have been ordered to mediate by local judges. Students will mediate 2-3 mediations per week throughout the semester. The Mediation Process class is required at the same time. For more information regarding the Mediation Clinic contact Tasha Willis, tlwillis@central.uh.edu. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at http://www.law.uh.edu/clinic/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5397 Mediation Clinic II - WILLIS (offered in Spring  2024)
Mediation Clinic students add to their list of lawyering skills learned prior to graduation by mediating real cases in Justice Courts, the Better Business Bureau, the EEOC, and for parties who have been ordered to mediate by local judges. Students will mediate 2-3 mediations per week throughout the semester. For more information regarding the Mediation Clinic contact Tasha Willis, tlwillis@central.uh.edu. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at http://www.law.uh.edu/clinic/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5497 Mediation Clinic II - WILLIS (offered in Spring  2024)
Mediation Clinic students add to their list of lawyering skills learned prior to graduation by mediating real cases in Justice Courts, the Better Business Bureau, the EEOC, and for parties who have been ordered to mediate by local judges. Students will mediate 2-3 mediations per week throughout the semester. The Mediation Process class is required at the same time. For more information regarding the Mediation Clinic contact Tasha Willis, tlwillis@central.uh.edu. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at http://www.law.uh.edu/clinic/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5297 Mediation Clinic II - WILLIS (offered in Fall  2023)
Mediation Clinic students add to their list of lawyering skills learned prior to graduation by mediating real cases in Justice Courts, the Better Business Bureau, the EEOC, and for parties who have been ordered to mediate by local judges. Students will mediate 2-3 mediations per week throughout the semester. The Mediation Process class is required at the same time. The Mediation Clinic and Mediation Process Class go together to create one three hour course. For more information regarding the Mediation Clinic contact Tasha Willis, tlwillis@central.uh.edu. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at http://www.law.uh.edu/clinic/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5397 Mediation Clinic II - WILLIS (offered in Fall  2023)
Mediation Clinic students add to their list of lawyering skills learned prior to graduation by mediating real cases in Justice Courts, the Better Business Bureau, the EEOC, and for parties who have been ordered to mediate by local judges. Students will mediate 2-3 mediations per week throughout the semester. The Mediation Process class is required at the same time. The Mediation Clinic and Mediation Process Class go together to create one three hour course. For more information regarding the Mediation Clinic contact Tasha Willis, tlwillis@central.uh.edu. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at http://www.law.uh.edu/clinic/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5497 Mediation Clinic II - WILLIS (offered in Fall  2023)
Mediation Clinic students add to their list of lawyering skills learned prior to graduation by mediating real cases in Justice Courts, the Better Business Bureau, the EEOC, and for parties who have been ordered to mediate by local judges. Students will mediate 2-3 mediations per week throughout the semester. The Mediation Process class is required at the same time. The Mediation Clinic and Mediation Process Class go together to create one three hour course. For more information regarding the Mediation Clinic contact Tasha Willis, tlwillis@central.uh.edu. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at http://www.law.uh.edu/clinic/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5297 Mediation Clinic II - WILLIS (offered in Summer I  2024)
Mediation Clinic students add to their list of lawyering skills learned prior to graduation by mediating real cases in Justice Courts, the Better Business Bureau, the EEOC, and for parties who have been ordered to mediate by local judges. Students will mediate 2-3 mediations per week throughout the semester. The Mediation Process class is required at the same time. For more information regarding the Mediation Clinic contact Tasha Willis, tlwillis@central.uh.edu. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at http://www.law.uh.edu/clinic/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5397 Mediation Clinic II - WILLIS (offered in Summer I  2024)
Mediation Clinic students add to their list of lawyering skills learned prior to graduation by mediating real cases in Justice Courts, the Better Business Bureau, the EEOC, and for parties who have been ordered to mediate by local judges. Students will mediate 2-3 mediations per week throughout the semester. For more information regarding the Mediation Clinic contact Tasha Willis, tlwillis@central.uh.edu. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at http://www.law.uh.edu/clinic/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5497 Mediation Clinic II - WILLIS (offered in Summer I  2024)
Mediation Clinic students add to their list of lawyering skills learned prior to graduation by mediating real cases in Justice Courts, the Better Business Bureau, the EEOC, and for parties who have been ordered to mediate by local judges. Students will mediate 2-3 mediations per week throughout the semester. The Mediation Process class is required at the same time. For more information regarding the Mediation Clinic contact Tasha Willis, tlwillis@central.uh.edu. Students must apply to the Clinic by submitting the online application at http://www.law.uh.edu/clinic/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re accepted, the Clinic Program Manager will enroll you via the Office of Student Services.

5497 Military Justice Clinic - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Spring  2023)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic will be assigned to defense teams in military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic will serve to familiarize students with practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5397 Military Justice Clinic - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Spring  2023)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic will be assigned to defense teams in military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic will serve to familiarize students with practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5497 Military Justice Clinic - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Spring  2022)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic will be assigned to defense teams in military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic will serve to familiarize students with practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5397 Military Justice Clinic - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Spring  2022)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic will be assigned to defense teams in military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic will serve to familiarize students with practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5497 Military Justice Clinic - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Fall  2022)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic will be assigned to defense teams in military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic will serve to familiarize students with practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5397 Military Justice Clinic - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Fall  2022)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic will be assigned to defense teams in military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic will serve to familiarize students with practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5397 Military Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Fall  2022)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic II course will continue to work with their assigned defense teams on military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic II course will continue the student’s education through practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5297 Military Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Fall  2022)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic II course will continue to work with their assigned defense teams on military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic II course will continue the student’s education through practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5497 Military Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Fall  2022)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic II course will continue to work with their assigned defense teams on military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic II course will continue the student’s education through practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5397 Military Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Spring  2022)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic II course will continue to work with their assigned defense teams on military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic II course will continue the student’s education through practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5297 Military Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Spring  2022)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic II course will continue to work with their assigned defense teams on military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic II course will continue the student’s education through practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5497 Military Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Spring  2022)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic II course will continue to work with their assigned defense teams on military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic II course will continue the student’s education through practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5397 Military Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Spring  2023)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic II course will continue to work with their assigned defense teams on military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic II course will continue the student’s education through practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5297 Military Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Spring  2023)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic II course will continue to work with their assigned defense teams on military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic II course will continue the student’s education through practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5497 Military Justice Clinic II - MARQUEZ, Jason (offered in Spring  2023)
Students in the Military Justice Clinic II course will continue to work with their assigned defense teams on military criminal justice cases pending adverse administrative board hearings and felony-level courts-martial. As members of the defense team, students will participate in pretrial conferencing, strategy sessions, investigation, witness interviews, discovery, expert consultant identification, motions practice, and representation at hearings. The Military Justice Clinic II course will continue the student’s education through practice before military courts and administrative boards. At the conclusion of their clinical work, those students with an interest in further military service will have demonstrated their commitment to service along with valuable practical experience. The Clinic’s supervising attorney will advise and assist those students interested in further service with applications to the multiple services Judge Advocates General Corps. Clinic coursework will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. All case-specific work will remain confidential and protected under the Attorney-Client Privilege.

5297 Military Law - MARQUEZ,J/MAAG (offered in Spring  2023)
This course will examine the statutory and regulatory framework of the U.S. military justice system and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. Lecture will provide an overview of constitutional issues and case law analyzing the legal issues in the military system of criminal jurisprudence. The course will further address operational law in the military context with an emphasis on the law of armed conflict and international humanitarian law.

5297 Patent Remedies & Defenses - LARSON (offered in Spring  2024)
The basic doctrines governing modern U.S. patent litigation; details of the main injunctive and monetary remedies for patent infringement and the limitations thereon; jurisdictional and venue problems. Four kinds of estoppel; details of fifteen affirmative defenses; discovery controversies and governing case law; impact of prior judgments on the same patent.

5397 Property (FLLM Only) - WARREN (offered in Fall  2023)
This course covers the doctrines, underpinnings and policy of property law. We will examine what makes property rights distinctive; how property rights are created, transferred, and destroyed; and what the powers and duties of property owners are.

5297 Public Health Law - EWER (offered in Fall  2023)
This course provides an in-depth examination of public health law principles and challenges. Students will explore constitutional issues related to public health and develop an understanding of the state’s public health powers and duties as they are balanced against an individual's legally protected rights. The course will explore a range of public health law issues, including infectious disease control measures, immunization policy, emergency preparedness and bioterrorism, government regulation of unhealthy products, the state’s role in promoting healthy behaviors, and public health surveillance and privacy issues.

5397 Renewable Energy Law - WARREN (offered in Fall  2024)
This course will provide a broad overview of U.S. renewable energy law and policy. It reviews existing renewable energy technologies and resources, discusses the practical limitations involved in their development, siting, and integration into the U.S. electricity grid, and analyzes the legal and regulatory framework for renewable energy development, the climate, and the environment.

5297 Reproductive Rights - RAINE (offered in Spring  2024)
This course introduces issues in reproductive health rights, including regulation of sex, pregnancy, and reproductive decision-making. Specifically, we will address legal and ethical questions that arise in the context of family planning and pregnancy. We will examine the issues from a historical and contemporary perspective, considering the role culture, gender, race, class, religion, sexual orientation, and social institutions play in shaping reproductive rights.

5297 Reproductive Rights - LAUGHTON (offered in Spring  2023)
This course introduces issues in reproductive health rights including regulation of sex, pregnancy and birth, family autonomy, and reproduction. Specifically, we will address legal and ethical questions that arise in the context of providing family planning services, assisted reproductive technologies, and pregnancy. We will examine the issues from both a historical and contemporary perspective, considering the role that culture, gender, race, class, religion, sexual orientation, and social institutions play in how law shapes reproduction.

5497 Street Law II - COHEN/JARAMILLO-MORENO (offered in Spring  2022)
Law students will teach high school age students about the law as a continuation of Street Law I. The semester also includes preparing the high school age students to compete in a Mock Trial competition. Street Law empowers young people to be active, engaged citizens by equipping them with the knowledge and skills they need to successfully participate in their communities. Law students will gain a greater knowledge of substantive law and how to explain the law to lay people, develop their ability for oral presentations both in formal settings and thinking on their feet, improve legal research skills, and gain an understanding of the legal system in the context of those persons directly affected by it. Students will participate in a weekly seminar class that will provide the resources and tools necessary for teaching the law to high school students and will commit to teach approximately 3-4 hours a week in a high school or a community organization.

5297 The Current Crisis in the Middle East - FOTEH (offered in SummerMini  2022)
This course will provide insight into substantive areas of history, religion, politics (regional and worldwide), longstanding relationships, legal systems, human rights and women’s rights framed by current events in the most volatile and important region in the world. Since the beginning of civilization, the Middle East has been the hotbed of ongoing conflict. It is to the point where one conflict is almost indistinguishable from another. The current provocation between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the Islamic Republic of Iran could potentially alter the map of the Middle East and have a massive irrevocable impact on the entire world. This course will begin by examining the issues leading up to the current hostility and continue through the potential outcomes and its potential impact on the world. This course will be a timely and interesting way to begin to understand the issues involved in this region and how it can impact Houston and the world.

5397 The Law of Patient Care - KOCH (offered in Spring  2023)
This three-credit course introduces students to basic legal and theoretical concepts related to the study of health law. Major topics include bioethical theories and their relevance to the law, medical malpractice, and the role of the courts in defining and applying standards of care. We will cover an array of interesting and challenging issues over the course of the semester, including the meaning of health, the nature of the physician-patient relationship, including privacy, access to care, and informed consent, public health, reproductive and genetic technologies, and end-of-life care. This class has a heavy discussion component and students are expected to come to class prepared to engage in an in-depth conversation about the assigned material. To that end, students enrolled in this course will become well-versed in the theory underlying the law and policy we study, as well as the black letter law.

5397 Trade & Sustainable Development - TRUJILLO (offered in Spring  2023)
This course introduces students to basic legal principles for international trade and its relevance to sustainable development. Students will review U.S. trade policy in the context of international trade rules established through the World Trade Organization and relevant regional trade agreements. Basic trade law will be examined, with a focus on the rules that relate to sustainability. As countries begin to transition their economies towards clean methods of supply-chain production and clean energy, international trade rules become increasingly relevant in both promoting sustainability and in managing domestic policies that comply with trade rules. The course will address the topic through the lens of the United Nations Sustainability Goals as well as through domestic policy, allowing for a fluid discussion of the local and global aspects of sustainable development. Specifically, related trade topics that impact environmental policy such as dispute settlement, supply-chain management, corporate social responsibility and international standards, border tax adjustments, tariff and non-tariff policies will be discussed. Though the focus of this course is primarily on environmental sustainability, it will also address other relevant areas of sustainability such as human rights and energy policy from the local, regional, and global perspectives. This course will have a final take-home exam. No pre-requisites are required to take this course. .

5397 Trade & Sustainable Development - TRUJILLO (offered in Spring  2024)
This course introduces students to basic legal principles for international trade and its relevance to sustainable development. Students will review U.S. trade policy in the context of international trade rules established through the World Trade Organization and relevant regional trade agreements. Basic trade law will be examined, with a focus on the rules that relate to sustainability. As countries begin to transition their economies towards clean methods of supply-chain production and clean energy, international trade rules become increasingly relevant in both promoting sustainability and in managing domestic policies that comply with trade rules. The course will address the topic through the lens of the United Nations Sustainability Goals as well as through domestic policy, allowing for a fluid discussion of the local and global aspects of sustainable development. Specifically, related trade topics that impact environmental policy such as dispute settlement, supply-chain management, corporate social responsibility and international standards, border tax adjustments, tariff and non-tariff policies will be discussed. Though the focus of this course is primarily on environmental sustainability, it will also address other relevant areas of sustainability such as human rights and energy policy from the local, regional, and global perspectives. This course will have a final take-home exam. No pre-requisites are required to take this course. .

5297 Trademark & Unfair Competition - WATKINS (offered in Spring  2022)
The course approaches trademarks from both historical and modern (i.e., internet) settings and deals with related issues of unfair competition such as commercial disparagement/defamation, right of publicity, privacy rights, and false advertising. It contrasts the predominantly use-based trademark system in the United States with registration-based systems in other countries. It examines ways in which an organization can develop, register, and assert trademark rights, as well as methods for enforcing those rights focused predominantly on the trademark infringement and dilution actions.

5397 U.S. Export Regulation - HANSON (offered in Spring  2023)
U.S. Export Regulation will focus on the export control procedures of the primary federal agencies that regulate U.S. Export Policy. Specifically included will be the procedures of the Department of Commerce and Bureau of Export Administration, the Department of the Treasury and the Office of Foreign Asset Control and the State Department through the Office of Defense Trade Controls. Attention will also be given to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the Anti-Boycott aspects of U.S. Export Policy.

5397 U.S. Export Regulation - HANSON (offered in Spring  2024)
U.S. Export Regulation will focus on the export control procedures of the primary federal agencies that regulate U.S. Export Policy. Specifically included will be the procedures of the Department of Commerce and Bureau of Export Administration, the Department of the Treasury and the Office of Foreign Asset Control and the State Department through the Office of Defense Trade Controls. Attention will also be given to the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the Anti-Boycott aspects of U.S. Export Policy.

5397 U.S. Import Regulation - HANSON (offered in Fall  2022)
This course is a practical study of U.S. import requirements including Customs procedures, legal issues related to the importation of merchandise, enforcement of the regulations of the myriad of federal agencies that regulate imports and, finally, the development of corporate import compliance programs. Broader topics include importing pursuant to trade agreements and importing within the context of developing security initiatives at home and abroad. The course is taught by an Adjunct Professor who began his career as an attorney within Customs and now, as a private practitioner, has 20 years of experience in this area of law.

5197 U.S. Legal skills - BREM (offered in Fall  2023)
This listing is a non-operational placeholder. Students cannot directly register for this course. General information about this course is available here: https://www.law.uh.edu/llm/US-Legal-Skills-Class.asp

5197 U.S. Legal skills - BREM (offered in Fall  2024)
This listing is a non-operational placeholder. Students cannot directly register for this course. General information about this course is available here: https://www.law.uh.edu/llm/US-Legal-Skills-Class.asp

5197 US Attorney Clinical Lab - KWOK/HEARD,C (offered in Fall  2024)
Students will have the opportunity to continue advanced criminal law studies in a small group. The clinic work component will provide students with practical experience and valuable exposure to real USAO cases.

5397 Vaccine Law - ABRAMSON (offered in Fall  2024)
This course covers the development, regulation and licensure of vaccines; equitable distribution and administration issues; public and private vaccination mandates, exemptions, exclusions, and accommodations; the National Vaccine Injury Compensation System and other means of compensation for vaccine adverse events; legal responses to antivaccination activism; bioterrorism and pandemic response; and international and comparative issues in vaccine law.

5297 VOIR DIRE: The Art of Juror De-Selection - WEEMS/ZIMMER (offered in Spring  2024)
The most important part of any trial is picking your jury - the audience that will hear your presentation and ultimately decide your case. In this class, the students will learn about the psychology as well as the law behind choosing a jury for any kind of case. Through practical exercises as well as a study of the applicable legal principles and case law, the class will learn techniques to try to get the panel talking so you can get the information you need from jurors to determine whether they will be a good fit for your case, how to properly strike for cause and preserve error as well as the best way to use peremptory strikes to ultimately try to get the best panel possible. The class will end with the students doing a full voir dire as well as closing arguments with the opportunity to watch jury deliberations to see how the panel they ended up with impacted the decision that was made.

5297 VOIR DIRE: The Art of Juror De-Selection - WEEMS/ZIMMER (offered in Spring  2023)
The most important part of any trial is picking your jury - the audience that will hear your presentation and ultimately decide your case. In this class, the students will learn about the psychology as well as the law behind choosing a jury for any kind of case. Through practical exercises as well as a study of the applicable legal principles and case law, the class will learn techniques to try to get the panel talking so you can get the information you need from jurors to determine whether they will be a good fit for your case, how to properly strike for cause and preserve error as well as the best way to use peremptory strikes to ultimately try to get the best panel possible. The class will end with the students doing a full voir dire as well as closing arguments with the opportunity to watch jury deliberations to see how the panel they ended up with impacted the decision that was made.

5297 VOIR DIRE: The Art of Juror De-Selection - WEEMS (offered in Spring  2022)
The most important part of any trial is picking your jury - the audience that will hear your presentation and ultimately decide your case. In this class, the students will learn about the psychology as well as the law behind choosing a jury for any kind of case. Through practical exercises as well as a study of the applicable legal principles and case law, the class will learn techniques to try to get the panel talking so you can get the information you need from jurors to determine whether they will be a good fit for your case, how to properly strike for cause and preserve error as well as the best way to use peremptory strikes to ultimately try to get the best panel possible. The class will end with the students doing a full voir dire as well as closing arguments with the opportunity to watch jury deliberations to see how the panel they ended up with impacted the decision that was made.

5397 Well-Being in the Law - HOFFMANL (offered in Spring  2023)
This course rigorously explores the challenges to well-being and happiness facing law students and legal professionals and then examines possible paths to overcoming those challenges. We will consider a number of questions and hard issues that bear directly on the lives of students now and after they enter the legal profession. For more, see the syllabus

5397 Well-Being in the Law - MOULTON (offered in Fall  2024)
This course will offer an in-depth exploration of the factors that influence physical, emotional, social, and financial well-being, particularly in law students and lawyers. We will learn techniques and participate in mindfulness activities (including meditation, yoga, sound baths, and others) designed to improve awareness of—and enhance—our own well-being. Experienced practitioners in various mindfulness disciplines, financial professionals, and practicing lawyers will join as guest speakers throughout the semester. This is an experiential course and will require your active participation.

7397 WRC: General Drafting for Smaller to Midsize Firm Attorneys - SWIFT (offered in Summer I  2023)
In this course you will develop skills necessary for drafting precise, clear, and complete documents. You will be exposed to drafting litigation documents, contracts, and other legal documents covering a wide-range of practice areas, similar to what some small to mid-size attorneys do, particularly early on in their careers. You will learn to research, evaluate, and use forms and checklists.

7397 WRC: General Drafting for Smaller to Midsize Firm Attorneys - SWIFT (offered in Summer I  2022)
In this course you will develop skills necessary for drafting precise, clear, and complete documents. You will be exposed to drafting litigation documents, contracts, and other legal documents covering a wide-range of practice areas, similar to what some small to mid-size attorneys do, particularly early on in their careers. You will learn to research, evaluate, and use forms and checklists.

7397 WRC: Law & Literature - WATSON (offered in Spring  2024)
This class uses literary texts to explore concepts in law such as justice, punishment, reward, and order. Instead of looking at these topics through the laws themselves, we will use texts to view them through the lens of those they impact. The texts will seek to help find the intersection of law and humanity through literature, from poetry to novel, from Shakespeare to Kingsolver.

7297 WRC: Poetry Law Interpretation - MARK DOW/DOW (offered in Spring  2023)
This course will focus on the work of American modernist poet Wallace Stevens and the problem of interpretation as it applies to poetry, law, and language in general.

7397 WRC: Texas Consumer Law - MARQUEZ, Ryan (offered in Fall  2023)
This upper-level writing course will teach skills necessary for a practicing lawyer while learning substantive aspects of Texas and federal consumer law. It is designed to enable students to learn to practice using various resources such as CLE articles, statutes, case law, practice guides, local rules, and judges rules to complete the assignments. There will also be a small presentation or oral argument component graded on a “good faith effort” completion. Students will work to improve their writing, fact investigation/review, and research skills. The course will require the completion of several short writing assignments. Drafts of the assignments will be reviewed with the instructor for feedback.

7397 WRC: Well-Being in the Law - HOFFMANL/MOULTON (offered in Fall  2023)
This course rigorously explores the challenges to well-being and happiness facing law students and legal professionals and then examines possible paths to overcoming those challenges. We will consider a number of questions and hard issues that bear directly on the lives of students now and after they enter the legal profession. I have previously taught this class as a non-writing course; that syllabus is available here: https://www.law.uh.edu/faculty/lhoffman/well-being.asp. This summer I will post an updated syllabus for this WRC-version of the class.

7397 WRS: Advanced Topics in Constitutional Law - CHANDLER (offered in Spring  2024)
In this writing seminar, students will have the opportunity to deepen their understanding of constitutional law, exploring both standard and frequently overlooked areas within the field. The course emphasizes rigorous analytical thinking and meticulous writing. It also introduces students to the effective use of modern AI tools for research and editing purposes. Participants will be required to develop a law-review quality paper on a doctrinal topic negotiated during the seminar, with the goal of enhancing both their understanding of constitutional law and their writing skills. The instructor prefers topics drawn from contemporary debates though historical perspectives are also fair game. The curriculum covers established areas such as federalism, the post-Civil War amendments, and the Bill of Rights, while also expanding to include topics often omitted from standard courses, such as Indian law, immigration law, territories, and voting rights. The instructor welcomes students with diverse ideologies and backgrounds and sees class as providing a forum for the safe and respectful exploration of ideas.

7397 WRS: Animal Law - MORATH (offered in Summer I  2022)
Animal Law is one of the fastest growing fields of legal practice and may involve issues of constitutional law, administrative law, environmental law, family law, and estates and trusts. In this class, we will address a broad range of topics including: the historical status of animals in the law; state legislative efforts and citizen initiatives to strengthen animal protection laws; the application of federal laws, including the Endangered Species Act and the Animal Welfare Act, to captive animals, wildlife, and farm animals; animal-related torts; constitutional standing to sue on behalf of animals; companion animals and the law; and the movement to obtain legal recognition of the rights of animals. All perspectives will be considered in class discussion and assignments. The class will include a guest speaker and a field trip. Students will be assessed through a combination of classroom participation, written reflections, and a final paper.

7397 WRS: Credit Cards, Law & Policy - HAWKINS (offered in Spring  2022)
Credit cards are everywhere in America, but in terms a payment system, they are a relatively recent innovation. In this writing seminar, we will read law review articles, cases, and other economics/business journal articles and/or books about the history of credit cards in America, the economics of credit cards, the consumer-protection issues related to credit cards, the credit card business, and the laws related to these issues. The goal is to obtain an in depth understanding of the credit card law and market and to produce a 10,000 word paper.

7397 WRS: Current Issues in Intellectual Property Law - GEBRU (offered in Spring  2024)
This advanced-level seminar will take a deep dive into some of the latest trends, challenges, and innovations in the dynamic intellectual property (IP) law field. Topics such as artificial intelligence, social media, the metaverse, international IP protection, indigenous knowledge protection, and open access frameworks will be explored within the context of IP law. Drawing from contemporary writings, case law, legislation, and news reports, students will critically analyze the evolving legal frameworks and their implications for creators, businesses, consumers, and the general public.

7397 WRS: Digital Markets - GUGGENBERGER (offered in Spring  2024)
This seminar will explore the law of networks, platforms, and utilities and examine its potential application to the digital economy. The course will cover the foundations of various regulated industries, antitrust law, and competition policy. There are no substantive prerequisites, although you might find a basic understanding of economics, digital platforms, or technology helpful. A paper is required.

7397 WRS: Digital Markets - GUGGENBERGER (offered in Spring  2023)
This seminar will explore the legal framework that makes and defines digital markets. We will focus on antitrust law and discuss various recent proposals to address economic concentration and predatory business practices online. We will also cover select aspects of privacy protections, intermediary liability and online speech governance, regulatory impulses from abroad, and telecommunications law. Overall, we will emphasize policy and its consequences on the digital economy. While you might find a basic understanding of economics, antitrust, digital platforms, or technology helpful, there are no substantive prerequisites. A paper is required.

7397 WRS: Energy and the Environment - WARREN (offered in Summer I  2022)
This writing seminar will explore pivotal issues involving the synergistic relationship between energy law and environmental law. The course will examine several critical topics of domestic and global importance associated with various sources of energy and the impact on natural resources and the environment.

7397 WRS: Feminist Legal Theory - GOMEZ (offered in Spring  2024)
This seminar will provide students with an opportunity to learn about different strands of feminist legal theory and to examine emerging topics in modern feminism. Students will read several classics in feminist thought, analyzing their pre-suppositions about sex, sexuality, gender, power relations, and the role of law in constructing or de-constructing those ideas. We will then discuss modern feminist dilemmas and analyze how the various strands of feminist legal theory might explain, support, or attack them. This course fulfills the UHLC writing requirement, with students writing academic legal papers on a topic related to the seminar and that is at least 10,000 words, (including footnotes) or approximately 35 pages

7397 WRS: Free Speech and the University - TEN CATE (offered in Fall  2024)
This course examines the boundaries of speech in universities through the lens of some of the most compelling defenses and criticisms of free speech and academic freedom. The course exposes students to the complex legal, social, and philosophical interests that are implicated in questions regarding the value and limits of free speech in universities. Students also develop their research, writing, and analytical skills by researching and writing a substantial paper. Lastly, students are expected to conduct themselves as members of a scholarly community, culminating in paper presentations and discussions.

7397 WRS: Freedom of Speech and Social Media - DOW (offered in Spring  2022)
This course will cover the Supreme Court's free speech and free press jurisprudence from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. The overarching theme will be to explore whether (and, if so, how) the emergence of social media, and the proliferation on online media and media platforms, require a fundamental rethinking of First Amendment jurisprudence. In addition, we will examine whether various immunity doctrines should be shrunken (or expanded), and whether certain categories of speech (e.g., obscenity, hate speech, speech presenting a so-called clear and present danger) remain coherent and, if so, remain entitled to the same level of protection. In addition to the writing requirement, grading will be based on student participation.

7397 WRS: Freedom of Speech and Social Media - DOW (offered in Spring  2023)
This course will cover the Supreme Court's free speech and free press jurisprudence from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. The overarching theme will be to explore whether (and, if so, how) the emergence of social media, and the proliferation on online media and media platforms, require a fundamental rethinking of First Amendment jurisprudence. In addition, we will examine whether various immunity doctrines should be shrunken (or expanded), and whether certain categories of speech (e.g., obscenity, hate speech, speech presenting a so-called clear and present danger) remain coherent and, if so, remain entitled to the same level of protection. In addition to the writing requirement, grading will be based on student participation.

7397 WRS: Gender, Power, Law & Leadership - KNAKE JEFFERSON (offered in Summer I  2023)
This seminar is inspired by the glaring omission of women from positions of power and leadership in the legal profession and beyond. While women continue to enter law school and the legal profession in relatively equal numbers to men, they remain outside of the structures of power---in the judiciary, law firms, the corporate world and even legal education---in the United States and beyond. This reality is even worse for women of color. Researchers, scholars, and practitioners commit a great deal of time, energy and resources to trying to change the landscape, yet progress seems stalled. Interestingly, very little attention is paid to the site where it all begins: law school. In this way, it makes sense to devote attention in an academic context to this topic. Students must write a substantial research paper, and will receive guidance about how to potentially publish their research as an op-ed, trade publication essay, or scholarly article.

7397 WRS: Gender, Power, Law & Leadership - KNAKE JEFFERSON (offered in Summer I  2022)
This seminar is inspired by the glaring omission of women from positions of power and leadership in the legal profession and beyond. While women continue to enter law school and the legal profession in relatively equal numbers to men, they are not reflected equally within the structures of power—in the judiciary, law firms, the corporate world, and even legal education. Researchers, scholars, and practitioners commit a great deal of time, energy, and resources to trying to change the landscape, yet progress has stalled in many ways. Interestingly, very little attention is paid to the site where it all begins: law school. In this way, it makes sense to devote attention in an academic context to this topic. This seminar exposes students to various theories of leadership and pursues an ongoing exploration of gender, power, and law. Students will engage in a substantial research and writing project that may fulfill the UHLC writing requirement.

7397 WRS: Law and Artificial Intelligence - SALIB (offered in Spring  2022)
What can artificially intelligent machines do? What should they do? This course will explore those two questions, especially as they relate to law and legal process. Already, artificial intelligences make many explicitly-legal decisions—for example, about pre-trial incarceration and policing. They also make many other decisions that, when humans make them, the law closely regulates. AI systems determine which candidates are interviewed for jobs, which applicants’ loans are approved, and what stocks hedge funds buy and sell. Are these systems up to the job? Can they perform their assigned tasks competently and fairly? Or does their use generate systemic risks in the arenas where they operate? Even if they can perform these tasks, should we trust them? Or will AIs reproduce their human creators’ greatest flaws, acting unfairly and discriminatorily and thereby further entrenching already-dire social inequalities?

7397 WRS: Law and Artificial Intelligence - SALIB (offered in Spring  2023)
What can artificially intelligent machines do? What should they do? This course will explore those two questions, especially as they relate to law and legal process. Already, artificial intelligences make many explicitly-legal decisions—for example, about pre-trial incarceration and policing. They also make many other decisions that, when humans make them, the law closely regulates. AI systems determine which candidates are interviewed for jobs, which applicants’ loans are approved, and what stocks hedge funds buy and sell. Are these systems up to the job? Can they perform their assigned tasks competently and fairly? Or does their use generate systemic risks in the arenas where they operate? Even if they can perform these tasks, should we trust them? Or will AIs reproduce their human creators’ greatest flaws, acting unfairly and discriminatorily and thereby further entrenching already-dire social inequalities?

7397 WRS: Law and Social Theory - MORALES (offered in Fall  2022)
In this seminar you will learn to analyze law in conversation with a variety of social theories. We will read a selection of authors from the Frankfurt School of social theory, Harvard Legal Studies movement, Feminism, Psychoanalysis, post-structuralism, post-colonialism and race and law. With the insights of these authors in mind, we will then reflect on the applicability of their social visions and insights to legal adjudication, education, and practice.

7397 WRS: Local Government Law - ZALE (offered in Fall  2024)
While much of law school focuses on federal law, local and state laws often affect people more directly and concretely. States and local governments have substantial law-making and regulatory authority in areas as diverse as education policy, civil rights, taxation, public safety, and land use. States and local governments are also responsible for the financing and provision of most public services, and are the locus of political participation by voters. States and local governments may have differing policy objectives and constituent demands, and how policy-making authority and service responsibility is allocated is a central question of local government law. This course examines the laws governing the powers of—and limitations on—states and local governments across a variety of substantive contexts, with a focus on the laws governing the relationship between states and local governments, as well as intergovernmental relations among local governments. The course requires a seminar paper examining current doctrinal and policy issues in local government law.

7397 WRS: NAFTA 2.0: North American Trade After the USMCA - TRUJILLO (offered in Spring  2024)
This course will introduce you to the North American Free Trade Agreement ("NAFTA") and its revised version under the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), along with the emerging legal and commercial issues surrounding the treaty. Because the NAFTA was the first U.S. regional trade agreement, it has been used as model for other regional trade agreements. We will discuss the context which brought about the NAFTA, study various USMCA provisions to understand the ways in which the USMCA changed (or not) the original NAFTA. Specifically, we will examine its dispute settlement processes (specifically current US disputes against Mexico on energy, environment, and labor), tariffs and the rules of origin and how they impact North American supply chain production, and the ways that the USMCA addresses environmental and labor controversies in the three countries. We will also examine the relationship between regional trade agreements like the USMCA to multilateral agreements and institutions such as GATT and the WTO as well as the impact of the USMCA on the economic, political, and social structures of the three participating countries. General issues of international law and trade will be discussed in the context of regional trade agreements and the ramifications of having (or not) a free trade agreement for the production supply-chains of the North American region. This course will have a final paper as the grade assessment which will meet the upper-level (WRS) writing requirement. No pre-requisites are required for this course.

7397 WRS: NAFTA 2.0: North American Trade After the USMCA - TRUJILLO (offered in Spring  2023)
This course will introduce you to the North American Free Trade Agreement ("NAFTA") and its revised version under the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA), along with the emerging legal and commercial issues surrounding the treaty. Because the NAFTA was the first U.S. regional trade agreement, it has been used as model for other regional trade agreements. We will discuss the context which brought about the NAFTA, study various USMCA provisions to understand the ways in which the USMCA changed (or not) the original NAFTA. Specifically, we will examine its dispute settlement processes (specifically current US disputes against Mexico on energy, environment, and labor), tariffs and the rules of origin and how they impact North American supply chain production, and the ways that the USMCA addresses environmental and labor controversies in the three countries. We will also examine the relationship between regional trade agreements like the USMCA to multilateral agreements and institutions such as GATT and the WTO as well as the impact of the USMCA on the economic, political, and social structures of the three participating countries. General issues of international law and trade will be discussed in the context of regional trade agreements and the ramifications of having (or not) a free trade agreement for the production supply-chains of the North American region. This course will have a final paper as the grade assessment which will meet the upper-level (WRS) writing requirement. No pre-requisites are required for this course.

7397 WRS: Reproductive Rights & Justice - PORTUONDO (offered in Fall  2023)
In the wake of Dobbs, the question of whether and how the government should regulate reproduction is more pressing than ever. This course will provide students with the tools to answer this question by exploring the law and theory of reproductive regulation in the United States. Students will learn both historical and contemporary approaches—including reproductive rights and reproductive justice frameworks—equipping them to understand how the law reached this point and how it might change going forward.

7397 WRS: Reproductive Rights & Justice - PORTUONDO (offered in Fall  2024)
In the wake of Dobbs, the question of whether and how the government should regulate reproduction is more pressing than ever. This course will provide students with the tools to answer this question by exploring the law and theory of reproductive regulation in the United States. Students will learn both historical and contemporary approaches—including reproductive rights and reproductive justice frameworks—equipping them to understand how the law reached this point and how it might change going forward.

7397 WRS: Transnational Petroleum Law - CARDENAS (offered in Spring  2023)
Transnational petroleum law or lex petrolea is conceived as the rules of law and the transnational legal order created by the transnational petroleum community constituted by States, corporations, professional industry associations and other industry actors participating in the oil and gas sector. Therefore, the course will focus on the transnational rules commonly associated with the petroleum industry such as: investment protection standards included in international investment treaties, industry standards and best practices, general principles of international law, model contracts, and arbitration jurisprudence. All these sources of law have a common element which is their transnational legal nature that transcends parties’ agreements and the regulation enacted by oil and gas producing nations. Indeed, this plurality of sources of law is considered altogether “the network” that governs transnational petroleum operations in the 21st Century. The course will also provide model contracts, standardized regulation and a collection of excerpts of arbitral awards in the oil industry which will guide our understanding of the new legal practices in the oil and gas sector. The cases under review will cover oil and gas arbitration in Latin America, North America, Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. For example: cases of international arbitration related to expropriation or indirect expropriation in Russia, Venezuela, and Ecuador; the use of industry best practices in Nigeria, Sudan, Mexico and Canada; the protection of foreign investments in the case of armed conflicts (Libya, Sudan, and Colombia); the imposition of sanctions against the oil industry in Iran, Russia, Libya, and Venezuela, and environmental litigation related to oil and gas investments.

7397 WRS: Transnational Petroleum Law - CARDENAS (offered in Spring  2022)
Transnational petroleum law or lex petrolea is conceived as the rules of law and the transnational legal order created by the transnational petroleum community constituted by States, corporations, professional industry associations and other industry actors participating in the oil and gas sector. Therefore, the course will focus on the transnational rules commonly associated with the petroleum industry such as: investment protection standards included in international investment treaties, industry standards and best practices, general principles of international law, model contracts, and arbitration jurisprudence. All these sources of law have a common element which is their transnational legal nature that transcends parties’ agreements and the regulation enacted by oil and gas producing nations. Indeed, this plurality of sources of law is considered altogether “the network” that governs transnational petroleum operations in the 21st Century. The course will also provide model contracts, standardized regulation and a collection of excerpts of arbitral awards in the oil industry which will guide our understanding of the new legal practices in the oil and gas sector. The cases under review will cover oil and gas arbitration in Latin America, North America, Europe, Asia, Africa and the Middle East. For example: cases of international arbitration related to expropriation or indirect expropriation in Russia, Venezuela, and Ecuador; the use of industry best practices in Nigeria, Sudan, Mexico and Canada; the protection of foreign investments in the case of armed conflicts (Libya, Sudan, and Colombia); the imposition of sanctions against the oil industry in Iran, Russia, Libya, and Venezuela, and environmental litigation related to oil and gas investments.

University of Houston Law Center

4170 Martin Luther King Blvd
Houston, TX 77204-6060

713-743-2100 General
713-743-2094 Legal Clinics