Conference focuses on juvenile issues

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May 20, 2011

Conference focuses on juvenile issues Amanda Hill ’11, center, was honored with the Napoleon Beazley Defender Award for her efforts on behalf of children while working as a third-year law student in the Southwest Juvenile Defender Center. Hill was presented her award by Professor Ellen Marrus, left, and Malikah D. Marrus, SWJDC research fellow at the Law Center. Beazley was executed for a crime he committed when he was 17-years-old. After his death the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty for juveniles was unconstitutional.
Professor Ellen Marrus, right, co-director of the Center for Children, Law & Policy, leads a discussion on ethical practices with Chris Phillis, of the Maricopa County (Arizona) Public Defender’s Office, as part of the 10th annual Zealous Advocacy Conference at the Law Center. The theme of this year’s conference, sponsored by the children’s center and the Southwest Regional Juvenile Defender Center, was “Back to Basics.” The two-day conference, which drew more than 80 participants, covered a broad range of issues relating to juveniles and the law from the criminal justice system to family law, education, and classroom searches.

Amanda Hill ’11, center, was honored with the Napoleon Beazley Defender Award for her efforts on behalf of children while working as a third-year law student in the Southwest Juvenile Defender Center. Hill was presented her award by Professor Ellen Marrus, left, and Malikah D. Marrus, SWJDC research fellow at the Law Center. Beazley was executed for a crime he committed when he was 17-years-old. After his death the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that the death penalty for juveniles was unconstitutional.

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