SEMINAR: ADVANCED TOPICS IN

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

 

SPRING 2019

 

TOPIC SELECTION NEEDED BEFORE FIRST DAY OF CLASSES:

The topic needs to be an approved (by me) research topic, the kind a judge or law firm partner would assign, with a product that reports the authorities; not an essay on your views.

To do a quality job without emotional distress, you need to investigate your subject, and pull the key authorities, before the semester begins.

 

 


Further re. topics:

High-visibility cases, such as recent Supreme Court decisions, are generally not advisable: (1) They have already been written to death by other scholars; and (2) they impair your ability to get your paper published after the semester ends.

You need a topic that has enough published material on it (cases; statutes; proposed statutes; etc.) to "make it go," i.e., to have something to write about.

Suggested approach: Go online through Bloomberg's BNA Patent Trademark & Copyright weekly journal, read the highlights for the past 6-12 months, and find a topic of interest.

 

 


 

THE PAPER -- 3 NON-EXTENDABLE SUBMISSION DATES:

The graded paper is due by email in two graded main installments and a graded final version. The installments will be graded 30 points each, and the ifnal version 40 points.

The first installment is due on or before Feb. 23. The second is due on or before March 25. Each will be promptly returned with a grade and my comments. The final version is due on or before April 26, the last day of classes.

I regret that no extensions can be allowed for any reason, because it is unfair to the other students who submit on time.

Each of the submissions is by email attachment in Word. I prefer double spacing throughout, for convenience of commenting. The final paper will be about 18,000 - 21,000 words or 45 pages. Each of the two earlier submissions should be about half that.

 

Blue Book format is needed for all cites. Discursive footnotes (i.e., longer than a mere parenthetical) will be most helpful to provide support for what you are saying in the text.

Here is a note on footnote writing style, especially how to avoid the overuse of parentheticals.