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Potential Client FAQs

What is the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic?
The Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic at the University of Houston Law Center ("ECDC") represents Houston-area entrepreneurs and nonprofit organizations in connection with transactional business law matters.

The ECDC gives second and third year law students exposure to real-life issues that confront local entrepreneurs and nonprofit organizations, while providing clients with sound legal advice and representation. Student attorneys work closely with their clients under the supervision of a professor who is a member of the State Bar of Texas.

Who can become a client of the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic?

Houston-area entrepreneurs and nonprofit organizations who require legal services that fall within the scope of services offered by the ECDC may submit an application.

The types of services the ECDC offers include: entity formation; drafting and negotiating commercial contracts; buying and selling equity or assets; and working with employees and independent contractors. The ECDC does not handle disputes or intellectual property matters.

What do I need to do to apply for services?

Submit a Potential Client Application online here.

We work with clients that are a good match for our student-led program and fit our other selection criteria. Because the ECDC's capacity is limited, we are unable to provide assistance to all potential clients that submit an application. Even if you submit an application, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to accept you as a client or provide assistance with any of the matters you describe in the application.

We attempt to provide an initial response to applicants within 10 business days.

What will I have to pay if I am accepted as a client?

Clients accepted by the ECDC sign a Legal Services Agreement and pay a $100 one- time administrative fee. Third party fees, such as Secretary of State filing fees, are the responsibility of the client.

Still have questions?

If you still have questions, please contact Christopher D. Heard, Clinical Assistant Professor and ECDC Director, at cdheard@uh.edu.

UHLC Student FAQs

What is the UHLC student's role in the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic?

Students take the lead representing the ECDC's clients under the supervision of a Texas licensed attorney. Students are given a combination of clients with which to work during the course of the semester including small businesses, aspiring entrepreneurs, and nonprofit organizations. Students will have the opportunity to work with clients on a range of transactional business needs such as entity formation, contract drafting, buying and selling equity and assets, and connecting clients to the legal knowledge and resources that can aid them in the further development of their business or organization.

Students will also have an opportunity to improve their public speaking skills through the clinic's partnership with the SURETM Program at the C.T. Bauer College of Business for which ECDC students will prepare and perform presentations on a range of business law topics during the course of the semester.

What does UHLC Student get out of the Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic?

The ECDC provides students with an unparalleled opportunity to practice transactional law with the benefit of having a faculty member, licensed by the State Bar of Texas, review their work, answer any questions, and provide feedback. Students will work to develop the skills necessary to have a successful transactional law practice, including contract drafting, legal research, time management, interacting with clients, public speaking, attention to detail, and professionalism.

How often does the class meet?

The ECDC has a classroom component that meets for two hours a week for fourteen weeks over the course of the semester. Student attorneys present and discuss their client matters during class meetings. The classroom component also provides students with a solid understanding of contract drafting and other skills necessary to be a successful transactional attorney. Students are required to devote 50 clinic hours per course credit during the semester. This means that students will be expected to devote either 150 or 200 total hours to clinic work, depending on whether they are taking the 3 or 4 credit version of the course.

Can part time students take the course?

Yes. Part time students have the opportunity to work with a faculty member who offers evening and weekend supervision by appointment.

Still have questions?

If you still have questions, please contact Christopher D. Heard, Clinical Assistant Professor and ECDC Director, at cdheard@uh.edu.