In re Gault: A 40-year Retrospective on Children's Rights

Gault Symposium
Friday, Nov. 2, 2007

Room 144 - Bates Law Building
University of Houston Law Center
Registration  8:30 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.
Roundtable Event: 9:00 a.m. - Noon
Cost: FREE

Speakers
Michael Lindsay, J.D., Ph.D.
Ellen Marrus, J.D.
Steven Mintz, Ph.D.
Wallace Mlyniec, J.D.
Irene Merker Rosenberg, L.L.B.

3.0 hours of CLE credit
(includes 1.0 hour of ethics)
This event is open to all, and includes a free lunch if RSVP is received before Oct. 30.

In re Gault is a landmark case decided by the United States Supreme Court in 1967. The case involved a 15-year-old boy, Gerald Francis Gault. After a trial in juvenile court, Gerald was placed in a "training school" for juvenile delinquents because of his alleged involvement with a prank call. As a juvenile Gault was denied many rights guaranteed to adults who are on trial for committing a crime - the right to notice of the charges, the right to confront witnesses, the privilege against self incrimination and the right to counsel. It was in this case that the United States Supreme Court recognized the similarities between juvenile trials and criminal proceedings and afforded children due process protections in juvenile court. 2007 is the 40th anniversary of this landmark decision and in honor of Gault, the Center for Children, Law & Policy (CCLP) of the University of Houston Law Center hosted a special event.

On November 2, 2007, a round table discussion was held at the University of Houston Law Center. The discussion focused on the question of whether the dream of Gault has been realized.

Publication of Papers based on Conference Presentations

Papers based on the proceedings from the Gault conference have been published in 44th volume of the peer edited Criminal Law Bulletin. Full text versions are available in PDF format below.

Proceedings from the Gault Symposium

This project is made possible in part with a grant from Humanities Texas, the state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, and NEH's "We the People" initiative.

Teaching the Importance of Gault in Schools

During the fall semester CCLP went into local schools to teach elementary, middle, and high school students about their right to an attorney. This ongoing community project will be hosted by the CCLP and headline center staff, local attorneys, and law students as speakers. These interactive presentations will allow students a chance to see how the Gault decision has made a difference in the legal rights of America’s youth.