Previous Selected Topics Courses (Courses from past 3 years)

5297 Administration of Estates and Guardianship - AKERS (offered in Spring  2014)
Administration of Estates and Guardianships. A skills class that will cover all types of administrations encountered with decedent’s and incapacitated estates: Dependent Administrations, Independent Administrations, Probating wills, alternative to probate administrations, Intestacy and guardianships. Students will review and be exposed to defective wills as well as proper wills and learn how to get them admitted into probate in addition to reviewing a variety of estate administration pleadings. Students will draft a will and prepare the pleadings to get the will admitted into probate as part of their examination grade.

5397 Administration of Estates and Guardianship - AKERS (offered in Spring  2015)
Administration of Estates and Guardianships. A skills class that will cover all types of administrations encountered with decedent’s and incapacitated estates: Dependent Administrations, Independent Administrations, Probating wills, alternative to probate administrations, Intestacy and guardianships. Students will review and be exposed to defective wills as well as proper wills and learn how to get them admitted into probate in addition to reviewing a variety of estate administration pleadings. Students will draft a will and prepare the pleadings to get the will admitted into probate as part of their examination grade.

5397 Administration of Estates and Guardianship - AKERS (offered in Fall  2015)
Administration of Estates and Guardianships. A skills class that will cover all types of administrations encountered with decedent’s and incapacitated estates: Dependent Administrations, Independent Administrations, Probating wills, alternative to probate administrations, Intestacy and guardianships. Students will review and be exposed to defective wills as well as proper wills and learn how to get them admitted into probate in addition to reviewing a variety of estate administration pleadings. Students will draft a will and prepare the pleadings to get the will admitted into probate as part of their examination grade. CLASS ASSIGNMENTS

5397 Administration of Estates and Guardianship - AKERS (offered in Spring  2016)
Administration of Estates and Guardianships. A skills class that will cover all types of administrations encountered with decedent’s and incapacitated estates: Dependent Administrations, Independent Administrations, Probating wills, alternative to probate administrations, Intestacy and guardianships. Students will review and be exposed to defective wills as well as proper wills and learn how to get them admitted into probate in addition to reviewing a variety of estate administration pleadings. Students will draft a will and prepare the pleadings to get the will admitted into probate as part of their examination grade.

5297 Advanced Finance Transaction Drafting - GINSBURG (offered in Fall  2016)
The purpose of this course is to prepare students for their first year of general corporate practice, whether in an in-house, law firm, or solo practice setting, by completing a simulated financing transaction. The course will focus on how secured transactions law, bankruptcy law and corporate law influence the structuring and documenting of a typical secured bank loan. Students will work through a hypothetical transaction that be the focal point of the entire semester. The class will begin by discussing alternative capital structures and how bank loans are used to finance acquisitions, growth and working capital needs. We will then analyze and draft credit and security documents, and learn how specific contract provisions are important to both borrowers and lenders. We will analyze all stages of finance transactions, and discuss the often divergent strategies and goals of lenders and borrowers. The fundamentals of negotiating critical provisions of a leveraged finance transaction will be stressed, with emphasis on private equity investors and their finance sources. The professor will relate many of his experiences in global finance transactions and share provisions from actual loan documentation to demonstrate how those fundamentals are applied in actual transactions. Although the course will be of particular interest to those pursuing a corporate or commercial law career, the concepts are applicable to any transactional practice.

5297 Advanced Finance Transaction Drafting - GINSBURG (offered in Fall  2015)
The purpose of this course is to prepare students for their first year of general corporate practice, whether in an in-house, law firm, or solo practice setting, by completing a simulated financing transaction. The course will focus on how secured transactions law, bankruptcy law and corporate law influence the structuring and documenting of a typical secured bank loan. Students will work through a hypothetical transaction that be the focal point of the entire semester. The class will begin by discussing alternative capital structures and how bank loans are used to finance acquisitions, growth and working capital needs. We will then analyze and draft credit and security documents, and learn how specific contract provisions are important to both borrowers and lenders. We will analyze all stages of finance transactions, and discuss the often divergent strategies and goals of lenders and borrowers. The fundamentals of negotiating critical provisions of a leveraged finance transaction will be stressed, with emphasis on private equity investors and their finance sources. The professor will relate many of his experiences in global finance transactions and share provisions from actual loan documentation to demonstrate how those fundamentals are applied in actual transactions. Although the course will be of particular interest to those pursuing a corporate or commercial law career, the concepts are applicable to any transactional practice.

5297 Advanced Legal Research & Writing for FLLM - TILTON-McCARTHY (offered in Spring  2014)
Advanced Legal Research and Writing for FLLM Students This course is designed to build on concepts taught in Lawyering Strategy Skills for FLLM students and provide the students with an opportunity to further hone their research and writing skills (with constructive feedback) as well as to learn new techniques to deal with more complicated legal issues. Advanced research skills will be taught, and the students will be expected to draft a memorandum covering more complex legal issues. In addition, students will negotiate a multifaceted transaction and draft the resulting contract. Students will also learn to draft a settlement agreement, a will and/or a client opinion letter. Lastly, students will be taught persuasive writing skills and will draft a trial motion or short appellate brief.

5397 Advanced Maritime Law - WINTON (offered in Spring  2014)
The advanced general maritime law course will focus on maritime jurisdiction—federal and state, maritime contracts, maritime torts, maritime liens, collisions, cargo claims, ship claims for damage caused by cargo, marine insurance, Protection and Indemnity Clubs, limitation of liability, general average, salvage, classification societies, jurisdiction of the United States Coast Guard and other aspects of maritime law. This course will not address injury or death claims by or on behalf of seaman, longshore or harbor workers, or other mariners or non-mariners, all of which are the subjects of their own advanced maritime law course. The basic general maritime law course is NOT a pre-requisite to be eligible to take this course. There will be a single exam given at the end of the semester which will be a closed book exam composed of essays and, perhaps, short answer questions

5297 Advanced Spanish for Lawyers - ROMERO (offered in Fall  2016)
An advanced-language course for students already fluent in Spanish. Students will strengthen their communicative language skills such as speaking, writing, interpreting, and vocabulary building within the context of several areas of legal practice.

5297 Advertising and Marketing Law - VAN SLYKE (offered in Spring  2016)
Advertising and Marketing Law teaches both the law and commercial perspectives concerning the advertising and marketing to consumers in a survey format that includes treatment of issues from false advertising under the Lanham Act, Federal Trade Commission regulation and enforcement, state attorney general enforcement, consumer class actions, substantiation of advertising claims, Internet advertising, consumer protection, privacy, data protection, trademark law, business torts, constitutional law, copyright law, social media marketing, and several other areas of law that are important to advertising and marketing to consumers.

5397 Banned Books - DOW (offered in Spring  2015)

5297 Brownfields: Environmental Law and Strategy - SHERMAN (offered in Fall  2016)
From contaminated property transactions and urban redevelopment opportunities to green buildings and sustainable corporate campuses, environmental considerations play a key role in today’s real estate marketplace. This course will address the legal, regulatory, and redevelopment challenges posed by environmental issues in real estate projects. These topics, for the purposes of course presentation, will be analyzed in four sections: “Superfund Liability and Brownfield Protections”, "Environmental Due Diligence", "Negotiating with Federal and State Regulators" and “Transaction and Redevelopment Strategies”. Each course segment will introduce students to a substantive evaluation of the core environmental issues presented and offer insights into the legal concepts, regulatory programs, deal documents, and redevelopment techniques utilized by real estate professionals to manage these challenges. During the course of the semester, students will be given two short, practical writing assignments related to the subject matter (e.g., preparing a submission to a regulatory agency/legislative committee and drafting an advocacy piece relating to project approval). The final assignment will be the preparation of a client memorandum analyzing the environmental issues in a real estate project and making a recommendation on whether - and if so, how - to proceed with the project notwithstanding the environmental challenges presented. The final project should be approximately 15 – 20 pages. The instructor will work closely with each student on their work. Grades are based on written work during the semester. There is no final examination. Completion of the course will position students to identify the environmental issues presented in any given real estate scenario, to evaluate their potential impact on projects, and to manage the challenges presented. Additionally, students should gain an understanding of the impacts of property conditions on human health and natural resources, the response of government regulators and investors to these threats, and the options available to real estate professionals for assessing and managing the environmental conditions affecting their projects.

5397 Business Administration and Financial Analysis for Lawyers - BRENNAN (offered in Fall  2015)
This 3-credit course is designed to introduce students to business administration and related financial analysis skills. This course should be considered for the law student with little or no prior course work in business or finance. The course will use the financial statements of publicly held corporations as the basis for introducing many of the and disciplines and functional areas of business. The following topics will be covered: corporate finance, management/organizational behavior, accounting/auditing, entrepreneurship and Marketing, information technology, review and analysis of financial statements, business strategies and personal financial planning.

5397 Business Administration and Financial Analysis for Lawyers - BRENNAN (offered in Spring  2015)
This 3-credit course is designed to introduce students to business administration and related financial analysis skills. This course should be considered for the law student with little or no prior course work in business or finance. The course will use the financial statements of publicly held corporations as the basis for introducing many of the and disciplines and functional areas of business. The following topics will be covered: corporate finance, management/organizational behavior, accounting/auditing, entrepreneurship and Marketing, information technology, review and analysis of financial statements, business strategies and personal financial planning.

7397 Case Studies in Energy & Sustainability - HOFMEISTER (offered in Spring  2016)
This course will explore current issues shaping both energy and sustainability in the United States. The professor, John Hofmeister, is a former president of Shell Oil and founder of Citizens for Affordable Energy. A nationally known expert on energy, he serves on the UH Energy Advisory Board. He has been an “executive-in-Residence for Sustainability” at the School of Sustainability at Arizona State University, where he has taught a version of this course for several years. The course will include a close analysis of U.S. energy and environmental policies. The primary requirement will be a group project analyzing ways to improve these policies. The course counts as the capstone requirement for the Energy & Sustainability minor, but it also will be an

5297 Children and the Law Lab - MARRUS/HUNT (offered in Spring  2016)
In this course students will have the opportunity to represent children in abuse and neglect proceedings in a Harris County court.

5297 Children and the Law Lab - MARRUS/HUNT (offered in Spring  2017)
In this course students will have the opportunity to represent children in abuse and neglect proceedings in a Harris County court.

5297 Children and the Law Lab - MARRUS/HUNT (offered in Spring  2015)
In this course students will have the opportunity to represent children in abuse and neglect proceedings in a Harris County court.

5197 Children and the Law Lab - MARRUS (offered in Spring  2014)
In this course students will have the opportunity to represent children in abuse and neglect proceedings in a Harris County court.

5397 Clean Air Act - PATEL (offered in Fall  2015)
Course Description: One of the hottest and ever-evolving area in environmental law is the Clean Air Act, a pivotal federal law that regulates air emissions from stationary and mobile sources. The key objective of the course is for students to gain understanding of the Clean Air Act of 1970 and various amendments, its historical roots in common law, major regulatory programs relating to air pollution control at federal, state and local levels, and emerging climate change issues relating to the regulation of greenhouse gases under the Clean Air Act. Students will acquire technical, legal, and policy knowledge to aid them in exploring challenging questions faced by environmental practitioners. We will be using a textbook as well as supplementing with pertinent agency regulations and guidance documents, case law, case studies, and current events as needed. The course will include a combination of lectures (including the opportunity to hear from guest lecturers prominent in the field), class discussions, and case studies. The course will have one final exam which will be open-book. Grading will be based on one final exam AND class participation.

5297 Client Interviewing & Counseling - HAWK (offered in Spring  2014)
The Client Interviewing and Counseling course will emphasize a “client-centered” approach to interviewing and counseling techniques. The course will touch on the major aspects of the attorney-client relationship, including (1) the initial client interview; (2) billing arrangements; (3) case analysis, development and strategy incorporating the client’s input and expectations; (4) preparing the client for negotiations, depositions, settlement discussions or trial; (5) terminating the attorney-client relationship; and (6) collecting fees. Students will engage in mock interviews and counseling sessions throughout the semester. The professor and classmates will provide constructive feedback after each session that can and should be incorporated into future practice sessions.

5397 Climate Change Law - HESTER (offered in Fall  2015)
The enormous challenges posed by global climate change have triggered equally fundamental legal changes. Climate change law has grown into one of the most active fields of environmental law which affects major industries, civil and criminal enforcement, transactions and international relations. Climate change lawsuits will also play their own central role in disputes over the right course of action and in efforts to help injured parties adapt to a rapidly changing world. This course will focus on the foundations, options and challenges to the use of environmental law to address climate change and to determine the obligations or liability of parties allegedly contributing it. We will review the current state of knowledge about the science underlying climate change findings and predictions, examine how environmental and tort laws have adapted to address earlier novel environmental threats and risks, explore the fast-growing network of international agreements, federal regulations and state laws that govern emissions of greenhouse gases or attempt to prepare for climate change effects, and assess how courts have responded to climate lawsuits and their specific legal challenges and evidentiary. Our examination will center on a practical examination on how this new field of law will affect real-world legal policies, permitting, lawsuits and transactions. This class will use a combination of lectures, discussions, in-class exercises, sample problems and case studies. Of course, all students should come to class prepared and able to join in class discussions.

5297 Clinic Externship I - BONADERO (offered in Summer II  2015)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements at either a nonprofit organization or a government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. If the placement where a student wishes to work for credit is not on the approved list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting a position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditation regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The LEX consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Clinic Externship I - BONADERO (offered in Summer IV  2015)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements at either a nonprofit organization or a government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. If the placement where a student wishes to work for credit is not on the approved list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting a position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditation regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The LEX consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Clinic Externship I - BONADERO (offered in Summer II  2014)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements at either a nonprofit organization or a government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage. If the placement where a student wishes to work for credit is not on the approved list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting a position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditation regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading the Daily LEX consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Clinic Externship I - BONADERO (offered in Summer IV  2014)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements at either a nonprofit organization or a government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage. If the placement where a student wishes to work for credit is not on the approved list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting a position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditation regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading the Daily LEX consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Clinic Externship II - BONADERO (offered in Summer IV  2014)
Well in advance of the semester in which they want to work, students should secure their field placements at either a nonprofit organization or government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage. If the placement which a student wishes to work for credit is NOT on the list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting an position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditations regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the program at www.law.uh.edu/clnic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in the course via PeopleSoft. If you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Student Services Office. Students taking an Externship II course have necessarily already completed Externship I; consequently, s/he does not need to attend an orientation prior to starting work. However, Externship II students must still comply with all other externship requirements (time logs, journal entries, completion of evaluations, and possibly a face-to-face meeting with the ED.) Requires student to work at placement for a minimum of 180 hours over the semester

5297 Clinic Externship II - BONADERO (offered in Summer II  2014)
Well in advance of the semester in which they want to work, students should secure their field placements at either a nonprofit organization or government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage. If the placement which a student wishes to work for credit is NOT on the list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting an position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditations regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the program at www.law.uh.edu/clnic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in the course via PeopleSoft. If you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Student Services Office. Students taking an Externship II course have necessarily already completed Externship I; consequently, s/he does not need to attend an orientation prior to starting work. However, Externship II students must still comply with all other externship requirements (time logs, journal entries, completion of evaluations, and possibly a face-to-face meeting with the ED.) Requires student to work at placement for a minimum of 180 hours over the semester

5297 Clinic Externship II - BONADERO (offered in Summer IV  2015)
Well in advance of the semester in which they want to work, students should secure their field placements at either a nonprofit organization or government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage at www.law.uh.edu/externship. If the placement which a student wishes to work for credit is NOT on the list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting an position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditations regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students taking an Externship II course have necessarily already completed Externship I; consequently, s/he does not need to attend an orientation prior to starting work. However, Externship II students must still comply with all other externship requirements (time logs, journal entries and/or reflective writing assignments, completion of evaluations, and possibly a face-to-face meeting with the ED.) Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Clinic Externship II - BONADERO (offered in Summer II  2015)
Well in advance of the semester in which they want to work, students should secure their field placements at either a nonprofit organization or government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage at www.law.uh.edu/externship. If the placement which a student wishes to work for credit is NOT on the list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting an position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditations regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students taking an Externship II course have necessarily already completed Externship I; consequently, s/he does not need to attend an orientation prior to starting work. However, Externship II students must still comply with all other externship requirements (time logs, journal entries and/or reflective writing assignments, completion of evaluations, and possibly a face-to-face meeting with the ED.) Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Comparative Health Law - LOPEZ De La Osa Escribano (offered in Fall  2016)
COMPARATIVE HEALTH LAW course focuses on the analysis of health foreign legal systems and topics, comparing them to the structure and notions existing in the US. The content of this course is organized around the following main 6 areas: 1. The difference between legal systems (Common Law and Continental Law) related to Health Law; 2. The notion of Patients’ Rights; 3. Elder Law and Health; 4. Healthcare, Healthcare systems and Health professions regulations; 5. Human biotechnology, research and bioethics; 6. Medical malpractice issues. In each session two, three or four foreign legal systems and its aspects related to health will be compared (during the whole course, the US will be compared to Spain, France, the United Kingdom, Italy, Brazil, or New Zealand among others countries). By means of transversal projection, when suitable, the main issues related to health and belonging to legal competences shared between Member States and the European Union, from a European Union Law perspective, will be highlighted. The objective is to study through practical cases and legal notions and structures, a number of chosen aspects related to Health Law from an international and comparative point of view. Doing so, the target is: ??To analyze the different health legal systems existing in the world and to define the interactions national healthcare legal systems can have worldwide. ??To foster interest in comparative law methods in Health to bring solutions to globalize matters and inspire further legislation. Lectures will be structured in (13) thirteen in-class sessions of 108 minutes each.

5397 Complex Litigation - RAVE (offered in Fall  2014)
This course picks up where civil procedure left off and covers the major procedural issues that arise in complex civil litigation. We will focus primarily on multi-party, multi-jurisdictional disputes, with particular emphasis on topics such as class actions, multidistrict litigation (MDL) practice, and other methods of aggregating claims. We will consider the kinds of strategic choices available to lawyers handling complex cases, economic and practical problems of settlement, the role of judges in supervising and managing aggregate litigation, and other modifications to the traditional rules of procedure intended for single-party, single-claim disputes.

5397 Computational Law - CHANDLER (offered in Spring  2015)
This course will assist students in developing projects relating to law and computation. Examples of potential project areas include development of precedent graphs relating to cases or patents; development of similarity measures between documents such as cases, patents, statutes; machine learning for the purpose of predicting case or administrative outcomes; statistical analyses of law, development of computer aided instruction or computer aided representations in fields of law, integration of geographic information systems with law and visualization of legal rules or other matters relevant to law. Students will also learn about current advances and opportunities in this field. Students will be expected to develop their projects using one of the following languages or systems: Excel, Google Spreadsheets, JavaScript, Python, Wolfram Mathematica or R. Use of other languages or systems is possible with the instructor’s permission. Some programming background is recommended for this course.

5297 Consumer Dispute Resolution - MCELVANEY (offered in Summer I  2016)

5297 Consumer Dispute Resolution - MCELVANEY (offered in Summer II  2016)

5297 Consumer Dispute Resolution - MCELVANEY (offered in Summer IV  2016)

5297 Consumer Dispute Resolution - TIEDE (offered in Fall  2015)

5297 Consumer Dispute Resolution - TIEDE (offered in Summer I  2015)

5297 Copyright Law - JOYCE (offered in Summer II  2014)
This is the basic Copyright course, but in a 2-credit format. Topics include prerequisites for protection, subject matter, ownership, duration, infringement (including secondary liability), affirmative defenses (including fair use), and federal remedies

5397 Corporate Compliance and Ethics - GOUDEAU III (offered in Fall  2015)
This course is designed to give students practical exposure to the elements of corporate compliance and ethics programs, as required under the U.S. Federal Sentencing Guidelines for Organizations. Additionally, students will receive an overview of laws and regulations in the areas of anti-bribery and corruption and international trade regulations (e.g., sanctions and export controls). Emphasis will be given to anti-bribery and corruption requirements under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and trade regulations involving the energy sector.

5297 Creditor's Rights - CERSONSKY (offered in Spring  2016)
Outline

5297 Creditor's Rights - CERSONSKY (offered in Spring  2017)
Outline

5397 Criminal Defense Clinic - TAYLOR (offered in Spring  2016)
Students in the Criminal Defense Clinic will be assigned misdemeanor cases and be responsible for handling all legal aspects of the case from arraignment to fact investigation to trial. The Clinic selects misdemeanor cases with a high probability of going to trial, which increases the likelihood of each student serving as lead attorney. Students will learn the law in a real-life context and develop profession and problem-solving skills. Students will be exposed to a wide range of cases such as assaults, thefts, driving while intoxicated and drug possession. Students will have the opportunity to investigate crime scenes and interview witnesses. The clinic will consist of a classroom component and courtroom component. The classroom component will focus on case preparation, advocacy skills and ethical considerations. The courtroom component will allow students to negotiate plea agreements and sit first chair as lead counsel in a jury trial. The clinic format is also designed to allow students to explore the intersection of criminal laws and social issues while receiving one-on-one supervision from former judge and prosecutor Yvonne Taylor.

5297 Criminal Justice Research on Right to Counsel and Pretrial Justice - THOMPSON (offered in Spring  2015)
This course will explore issues of the Sixth Amendment right to counsel, as well as pretrial release procedures. Students will be expected to spend a total of 20 hours observing court proceedings (mostly during class time) and taking careful notes by hand which will need to be typed up and submitted. In addition, students will write original 15-page research papers on various issues pertaining to pretrial justice issues. Students will be graded on the basis of their courtroom observation submissions as well as the research paper. This course will be unusual in that there will be very little required reading and only a few classroom sessions at the law school. I will send the readings electronically in about a week. There will be about 50 pages of quick reading required for the first class. The course will provide students with an opportunity to be actively involved in policymaking research and criminal justice advocacy. The first couple of weeks we will meet at school for discussion of readings and training for courtroom observation, as well as discussion of the short research papers. Thereafter, most of the semester students will only be required to attend court sessions downtown (on Franklin). The school will reimburse students for parking. We will probably meet once or twice at school during the semester to touch base on the court transcripts and research papers. I have not yet worked out all the details, but I will post a final schedule for the course by about January 9th. The courtroom observations will provide critical empirical data on practices in the Harris County Criminal Courts. This information will enable policymakers and criminal justice advocates the information needed to determine whether the criminal justice system is working properly. In addition, as there is a great deal of interest in pretrial justice issues at the moment, I will provide a list of topics for which research is needed to help inform local officials as they move forward with reforms. The course thus gives students an opportunity to be actively involved in the improvement of the criminal justice system in our city.

5297 Criminal Practice - BRALEY (offered in Spring  2015)
This is a federal criminal trial practice skills class. Skill sets include opening statement, direct examination, cross-examination, impeachment, handling exhibits and demonstrative aids, evidentiary foundations, motion practice, objections, and closing argument. The class is based on a trial problem that sets forth a hypothetical criminal case. Students are expected to analyze the case, develop prosecution and defense strategies, understand rules of evidence and procedure applicable to federal criminal trials, and either prosecute or defend the case to verdict. The professors will divide each class into a lecture session and skills portion. Students must participate during each session. Final grade will be based, at least in part, upon application of principles discussed during the course and moot trial held before a federal judge at course end. Professors will provide feedback and guidance throughout the process. Attendance and participation will also factor into grading as described in the syllabus.

5297 Criminal Practice - McCONNELL/BRALEY/GALLAGHER (offered in Summer II  2014)
This is a federal criminal trial practice skills class. Skill sets include opening statement, direct examination, cross-examination, impeachment, handling exhibits and demonstrative aids, evidentiary foundations, motion practice, objections, and closing argument. The class is based on a trial problem that sets forth a hypothetical criminal case. Students are expected to analyze the case, develop prosecution and defense strategies, understand rules of evidence and procedure applicable to federal criminal trials, and either prosecute or defend the case to verdict. The professors will divide each class into a lecture session and skills portion. Students must participate during each session. Final grade will be based, at least in part, upon application of principles discussed during the course and moot trial held before a federal judge at course end. Professors will provide feedback and guidance throughout the process. Attendance and participation will also factor into grading as described in the syllabus.

5397 Crimmigration - HOFFMAN G (offered in Summer IV  2014)
This course will introduce students to the many issues at the intersection of immigration law and criminal law. Crimmigration is a complex and dynamic area of law. The course will provide students with the knowledge required to recognize and analyze the potential immigration consequences of a variety of criminal pleas and convictions.

5397 Crimmigration - HOFFMAN G (offered in Summer IV  2015)
This course will introduce students to the many issues at the intersection of immigration law and criminal law. Crimmigration is a complex and dynamic area of law. The course will provide students with the knowledge required to recognize and analyze the potential immigration consequences of a variety of criminal pleas and convictions.

5397 Crimmigration - HOFFMAN G (offered in Summer IV  2016)
This course will introduce students to the many issues at the intersection of immigration law and criminal law. Crimmigration is a complex and dynamic area of law. The course will provide students with the knowledge required to recognize and analyze the potential immigration consequences of a variety of criminal pleas and convictions.

5397 Digital Transactions - LIPTON (offered in Fall  2016)
The objectives of this course are to teach the substantive law of digital transactions and electronic commerce (with related intellectual property concepts) in a comprehensive manner, to consider ethical and professional questions related to the subject matter, and to integrate the subject matter with the analytical and practical skills necessary to the practice of law.

5397 Digital Transactions - VETTER (offered in Fall  2015)
The objectives of this course are to teach the substantive law of digital transactions and electronic commerce (with related intellectual property concepts) in a comprehensive manner, to consider ethical and professional questions related to the subject matter, and to integrate the subject matter with the analytical and practical skills necessary to the practice of law. Normally, the class simulates the creation of a technology company (typically an Internet-centric corporation) and reviews the legal issues related to an online venture.

5397 Diplomacy for Oil and Gas - CARDENAS (offered in Spring  2016)
This course features the crossroads between geopolitics and law. We will study the legal instruments that have been built to govern inter-state and state-corporate relations in the oil and gas industry, providing to the students political and economy background for investment strategies of the oil industry. Readings for this course will be focused on international treaties and public international law applicable to the oil and gas industry. We will also study selected chapters on energy geopolitics such as: 1)The Energy World is Flat by Daniel Lacalle and Diego Parrilla 2)The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World by Daniel Yergin 3)The End of Power by Moises Naim

5397 Diplomacy for Oil and Gas - CARDENAS (offered in Spring  2017)
This course features the crossroads between geopolitics and law. We will study the legal instruments that have been built to govern inter-state and state-corporate relations in the oil and gas industry, providing to the students political and economy background for investment strategies of the oil industry. Readings for this course will be focused on international treaties and public international law applicable to the oil and gas industry. We will also study selected chapters on energy geopolitics such as: 1)The Energy World is Flat by Daniel Lacalle and Diego Parrilla 2)The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World by Daniel Yergin 3)The End of Power by Moises Naim

5297 Drafting & Negotiating Int'l Oil & Gas Agreements - Norman Nadorff (offered in Spring  2014)
The course will enhance the students´ knowledge of major types of international oil and gas agreements while providing practical, hands-on experience in their drafting and negotiation. Students will be provided a detailed and realistic fact pattern showing how oil and gas deals are conceived of, proposed, negotiated and eventually formalized. The students will then apply the fact pattern to various types of oil and gas model agreements. In essence, Professor Nadorff will show the students how an international oil and gas lawyer approaches every day oil and gas industry challenges. The course contains the following major components: • A discussion of the role of the contract drafters and negotiators in the oil and gas industry • Practical tips on how to write contracts more clearly and effectively as well as identifying pitfalls to be avoided. • Contract strategies and "do´s and dont´s" in contract negotiations. • A thorough discussion of pre-contractual documents (letters of intent, memoranda of association, etc), including na in-class review of a homework assignment. • An introduction to the Association of International Petroleum Negotiators (AIPN) and the AIPN Model Form Contracts. • In class, on-screen editing by the students of key AIPN Model Form Agreements (most likely: Confidentiality, Joint Study and Bidding, Farmout, Joint Operating Agreement, Lifting, International Consultant and Oil Service). • In-class negotiations of various AIPN Model Form Agreements based on the supplied fact pattern, ideally involving all of the students at some point. It is anticipated that for each class, Professor Nadorff will invite a prominent lawyer or negotiator, specialized in the particular agreement being discussed that day, in order to provide additional perspective and to help facilitate the in-class exercises.

5297 E-Discovery - CHAUMETTE (offered in Summer II  2014)
The increased presence of technology in the workplace has also required significant changes in the way litigation, and specifically discovery, is handled. Adapting to these changes, litigants face an ever-changing arena referred to as electronic discovery, which can be a veritable treasure trove or minefield depending on the level of preparation taken by the client and the client’s counsel prior to the arrival of any legal dispute. This course will outline the major issues and considerations for lawyers involved in the electronic discovery process and prepare the students to face these challenges in their practice.

5297 Elder Law - LOOTENS (offered in Fall  2015)
This course is an introduction to the myriad of legal issues that are often grouped under various titles such as Elder Law, Aging and the Law, or Elderly and the Law. The course will highlight the social and legal issues associated with an aging society, a critical understanding of the distinct legal problems of the elderly and a familiarity with governmental programs aimed at older people.

5397 Elections and the Law of Democracy - RAVE (offered in Fall  2016)
This course covers the law that structures democratic politics and the processes of democracy, with a primary focus on constitutional law and election law. Subjects covered include the individual right to vote and participate; redistricting; campaign finance regulation and reform; resolution of disputed elections; the role of groups and associations such as political parties in democratic politics; the tension between majorities and minorities in the design of representative institutions; and the role of courts in overseeing democratic processes. The course will focus primarily on American law and doctrine. The course will include a good deal of material about contemporary legal issues in this area, including issues from the 2012 presidential election and the Supreme Court's recent decision about the constitutionality of the Voting Rights Act, and similar current issues.

5397 Elections and the Law of Democracy - RAVE (offered in Fall  2014)
This course covers the law that structures democratic politics and the processes of democracy, with a primary focus on constitutional law and election law. Subjects covered include the individual right to vote and participate; redistricting; campaign finance regulation and reform; resolution of disputed elections; the role of groups and associations such as political parties in democratic politics; the tension between majorities and minorities in the design of representative institutions; and the role of courts in overseeing democratic processes. The course will focus primarily on American law and doctrine. The course will include a good deal of material about contemporary legal issues in this area, including issues from the 2012 presidential election and the Supreme Court's recent decision about the constitutionality of the Voting Rights Act, and similar current issues.

5297 Eminent Domain and Private Property Rights - HODGE/MAYFIELD (offered in Fall  2016)
Texas is home to eight of the nation’s 15 fastest-growing cities and boasts five of the top 10 cities in the total number of new residents. This growth is not a new phenomenon. Texas has added more residents than any other state since 2000. But what happens when the infrastructure growth associated with the Texas population boom impacts private property owners? An inherent tension exists between public projects needed to accommodate Texas’s expansive growth and fundamental property rights protected by the U.S. and Texas Constitutions. Eminent domain—the power of a governmental entity (or those with its delegated authority) to take private property and convert it into public use for just compensation—is designed to balance public and private property interests. Class discussions and reading assignments will explore whether the current eminent domain framework protects property owners and the public. The subject is generally divided into two interrelated parts: (1) the origins of eminent domain, public use, and public necessity; and (2) “just” compensation (including evidentiary and procedural issues that impact value).

5397 Endangered Species and Biodiversity Law - IRVINE (offered in Fall  2015)

5297 Energy and the Environment - LANDERS (offered in Spring  2015)
An environmental law course that will explore pivotal issues involving the synergistic relationship between energy law and environmental law. The course will examine several critical topics of global importance associated with various sources of energy and the impact on natural resources and the environment.

5397 Energy Law & Policy - WARREN (offered in Spring  2017)

5297 Environmental Issues in Real Estate - SHERMAN (offered in Fall  2014)
This course will address the legal, business, and financial challenges posed by environmental issues in real estate projects. From brownfield transactions and wetlands impacts to Class B/C office buildings and urban redevelopment projects to green building requirements and sustainable corporate campuses, environmental considerations play a key role in today’s real estate marketplace. These topics, for the purposes of course presentation, will be analyzed in three sections: "Environmental Issues in Building Operations and Property Management", "Environmental Issues in Real Estate Transactions" and “Environmental Issues in Real Estate Development”. Each course segment will introduce students to a substantive evaluation of the core environmental issues presented and offer insights into the purchase agreements, financial analyses, and deal structures utilized by real estate professionals to manage these matters. During the course of the semester, students will be given two short, practical writing assignments related to the subject matter (e.g., preparing a submission to a regulatory agency/legislative committee and drafting an advocacy piece relating to project approval). The final assignment will be the preparation of a memorandum analyzing the environmental issues in a real estate project and making a recommendation on whether - and if so, how - to proceed with the project notwithstanding the environmental challenges presented. The final project should be approximately 15 pages. The instructor will work closely with each student on their work. Grades are based on written work during the semester. There is no final examination. Completion of the course will position students to identify the environmental issues presented in any given real estate scenario, to evaluate their potential impact on projects, and to manage the challenges presented. Additionally, students should gain an understanding of the impacts of property conditions on human health and natural resources, the response of government regulators and investors to these threats, and the options available to real estate professionals for assessing and managing the environmental conditions affecting their projects. Outline

5297 Environmental Law in the Oil & Gas Industry - BORTKA (offered in Fall  2014)

5397 Environmental Law Practicum - HESTER (offered in Spring  2017)
This course will overview key areas of practice within environmental law such as regulatory counseling and permitting, civil enforcement, criminal liability, private litigation over environmental contamination, policy advocacy, and environmental aspects of commercial transactions. Each lecture topic will be paired with a separate presentation by a guest speaker who practices in that area, and who will provide examples of live projects and cases for class participation and review. These speakers may include the Harris County Attorney (civil enforcement), the Galveston Bay Foundation (permitting), the Harris County District Attorney (criminal), the Audubon Society (policy advocacy) and others.

5397 Environmental Law Practicum - HESTER (offered in Spring  2016)
This course will overview key areas of practice within environmental law such as regulatory counseling and permitting, civil enforcement, criminal liability, private litigation over environmental contamination, policy advocacy, and environmental aspects of commercial transactions. Each lecture topic will be paired with a separate presentation by a guest speaker who practices in that area, and who will provide examples of live projects and cases for class participation and review. These speakers may include the Harris County Attorney (civil enforcement), the Galveston Bay Foundation (permitting), the Harris County District Attorney (criminal), the Audubon Society (policy advocacy) and others.

5397 Environmental Law Practicum (Formerly known as Practice of Environmental Law) - HESTER (offered in Spring  2015)
This course will overview key areas of practice within environmental law such as regulatory counseling and permitting, civil enforcement, criminal liability, private litigation over environmental contamination, policy advocacy, and environmental aspects of commercial transactions. Each lecture topic will be paired with a separate presentation by a guest speaker who practices in that area, and who will provide examples of live projects and cases for class participation and review. These speakers may include the Harris County Attorney (civil enforcement), the Galveston Bay Foundation (permitting), the Harris County District Attorney (criminal), the Audubon Society (policy advocacy) and others.

5297 European Union (EU) Energy Law - BURKE- ROEBEN: Guest Lecturer (offered in Spring  2016)
European Energy Law Course Outline: Energy in the 21st century is a global market. This class focuses on the fast growing energy law of the European Union, which is pursuing the strategic project of establishing a “European Energy Union” for the 28 member states of the EU and further applicant states. The purpose is to identify the main objectives and dimensions of action of the EEUS. The discussion will enable students to draw parallels with US energy law and to analyze the increasingly important international context in which both operate. The general scope of the class is as follows: 1) Introduction I- Basic notions and mechanisms of European Union policy and law-making. II- The process of formulating a European Energy Union strategy and its implementation. III- Governance of the European Energy Union 2) Energy Security I- Diversifying the sources of energy II- Energy in the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership between the US and the EU III – Energy solidarity 3) The Internal Energy Market – I – Hardware of the Internal Energy Market. Investing in, planning and establishing large scale infrastructure II- Software of the Internal Energy Market. Establishing continent-wide common rules III - Accessing the European Energy Market 4) Decarbonizing the economy I. The international regulation of climate change. The Road to Paris 2015 II. Making carbon emissions trading work in the EU III. Implications for energy mix 5) The Future. Energy and the zero marginal cost economy

5397 Family Immigration Law - BECK (offered in Spring  2016)
Utilizing federal statutes, regulations, case law, the Visa Bulletin, the U.S. Dept. of State Foreign Affairs Manual as well as federal agency memoranda, students will work individually and in groups to find legal solutions to hypothetical situations that involve the immigration of families to the U.S. Students will develop practical skills that will enable them to successfully represent clients who are seeking immigration benefits through a family member in the U.S. or abroad. The class will be a combination of lecture, in-class exercises and take-home assignments.

5397 Family Immigration Law - BECK (offered in Spring  2015)
Utilizing federal statutes, regulations, case law, the Visa Bulletin, the U.S. Dept. of State Foreign Affairs Manual as well as federal agency memoranda, students will work individually and in groups to find legal solutions to hypothetical situations that involve the immigration of families to the U.S. Students will develop practical skills that will enable them to successfully represent clients who are seeking immigration benefits through a family member in the U.S. or abroad. The class will be a combination of lecture, in-class exercises and take-home assignments.

5397 Family Immigration Law - BECK (offered in Spring  2017)
Utilizing federal statutes, regulations, case law, the Visa Bulletin, the U.S. Dept. of State Foreign Affairs Manual as well as federal agency memoranda, students will work individually and in groups to find legal solutions to hypothetical situations that involve the immigration of families to the U.S. Students will develop practical skills that will enable them to successfully represent clients who are seeking immigration benefits through a family member in the U.S. or abroad. The class will be a combination of lecture, in-class exercises and take-home assignments.

5297 Family Law Advocacy - FARR (offered in Spring  2017)
Overview of Family Law case from initial interview through trial and closing documents. Overview of Texas Family Code how to generally navigate it and common problem statutes to know for practice. For more information please see the syllabus.

5297 Family Law Advocacy - FARR (offered in Spring  2016)
Overview of Family Law case from initial interview through trial and closing documents. Overview of Texas Family Code how to generally navigate it and common problem statutes to know for practice. For more information please see the syllabus.

7397 Finance and Ethics - ARBOGAST (offered in Spring  2014)

5397 Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers - BRENNAN (offered in Summer II  2014)
Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers is a graduate level course that will cover the area of introductory financial reporting and analysis. Included in the course will be introduction to the mechanics of financial accounting, the building of financial statements, reporting and analysis of financial information and in depth study of accounting principles and procedures. Certain business and financial practices are also covered. The reporting of the financial and operating results of the business entity through the financial statements is a major objective of any company or organization. By the end of this course you will know the reporting requirements of public companies, how the information in the financial statements is used and analyzed and how the information is accounted for and derived in the form of financial statements. You will also know how to read financial statements as a decision maker in evaluating companies and how lawyers must use this information in their practices.

5397 Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers - BRENNAN (offered in Summer II  2015)
Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers is a graduate level course that will cover the area of introductory financial reporting and analysis. Included in the course will be introduction to the mechanics of financial accounting, the building of financial statements, reporting and analysis of financial information and in depth study of accounting principles and procedures. Certain business and financial practices are also covered. The reporting of the financial and operating results of the business entity through the financial statements is a major objective of any company or organization. By the end of this course you will know the reporting requirements of public companies, how the information in the financial statements is used and analyzed and how the information is accounted for and derived in the form of financial statements. You will also know how to read financial statements as a decision maker in evaluating companies and how lawyers must use this information in their practices.

5397 Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers - BRENNAN (offered in Summer II  2016)
Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers is a graduate level course that will cover the area of introductory financial reporting and analysis. Included in the course will be introduction to the mechanics of financial accounting, the building of financial statements, reporting and analysis of financial information and in depth study of accounting principles and procedures. Certain business and financial practices are also covered. The reporting of the financial and operating results of the business entity through the financial statements is a major objective of any company or organization. By the end of this course you will know the reporting requirements of public companies, how the information in the financial statements is used and analyzed and how the information is accounted for and derived in the form of financial statements. You will also know how to read financial statements as a decision maker in evaluating companies and how lawyers must use this information in their practices.

5397 Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers - BRENNAN (offered in Spring  2016)
Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers is a graduate level course that will cover the area of introductory financial reporting and analysis. Included in the course will be introduction to the mechanics of financial accounting, the building of financial statements, reporting and analysis of financial information and in depth study of accounting principles and procedures. Certain business and financial practices are also covered. The reporting of the financial and operating results of the business entity through the financial statements is a major objective of any company or organization. By the end of this course you will know the reporting requirements of public companies, how the information in the financial statements is used and analyzed and how the information is accounted for and derived in the form of financial statements. You will also know how to read financial statements as a decision maker in evaluating companies and how lawyers must use this information in their practices.

5397 Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers - BRENNAN (offered in Spring  2017)
Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers is a graduate level course that will cover the area of introductory financial reporting and analysis. Included in the course will be introduction to the mechanics of financial accounting, the building of financial statements, reporting and analysis of financial information and in depth study of accounting principles and procedures. Certain business and financial practices are also covered. The reporting of the financial and operating results of the business entity through the financial statements is a major objective of any company or organization. By the end of this course you will know the reporting requirements of public companies, how the information in the financial statements is used and analyzed and how the information is accounted for and derived in the form of financial statements. You will also know how to read financial statements as a decision maker in evaluating companies and how lawyers must use this information in their practices.

5397 Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers - BRENNAN (offered in Spring  2017)
Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers is a graduate level course that will cover the area of introductory financial reporting and analysis. Included in the course will be introduction to the mechanics of financial accounting, the building of financial statements, reporting and analysis of financial information and in depth study of accounting principles and procedures. Certain business and financial practices are also covered. The reporting of the financial and operating results of the business entity through the financial statements is a major objective of any company or organization. By the end of this course you will know the reporting requirements of public companies, how the information in the financial statements is used and analyzed and how the information is accounted for and derived in the form of financial statements. You will also know how to read financial statements as a decision maker in evaluating companies and how lawyers must use this information in their practices.

5397 Foreign Affairs - BERMAN (offered in Fall  2016)
This course examines the constitutional and statutory doctrines regulating the conduct of America’s foreign relations. Topics include the distribution of foreign relations powers between the three branches of the federal government, the scope of the government’s war power, the status of international law in U.S. courts, the nature of the treaty power, the validity of executive agreements, the pre-emption of state foreign-relations activities, and the political question and other doctrines regulating judicial review in foreign relations cases.

5397 Foreign Affairs - BERMAN (offered in Fall  2015)
This course examines the constitutional and statutory doctrines regulating the conduct of America’s foreign relations. Topics include the distribution of foreign relations powers between the three branches of the federal government, the scope of the government’s war power, the status of international law in U.S. courts, the nature of the treaty power, the validity of executive agreements, the pre-emption of state foreign-relations activities, and the political question and other doctrines regulating judicial review in foreign relations cases.

5397 Foundational Issues in Health Law: Patient, Provider, Society and the Law - WILLIAMS (offered in Spring  2015)
This three-credit course introduces students to basic legal and theoretical concepts related to the study of health law. Major topics include bioethical theories and their relevance to the law, medical malpractice, and the role of the courts in defining and applying standards of care. We will cover an array of interesting and challenging issues over the course of the semester, including the meaning of health, the nature of the physician-patient relationship, public health, organ transplantation, reproductive technologies, and end-of-life care. This class has a heavy discussion component and students are expected to come to class prepared to engage in an in-depth conversation about the assigned material. To that end, students enrolled in this course will become well-versed in the theory underlying the law and policy we study, as well as the black letter law.

5397 Foundational Issues in Health Law: Patient, Provider, Society and the Law. - EWER (offered in Fall  2014)
This three-credit course introduces students to basic legal and theoretical concepts related to the study of health law. Major topics include bioethical theories and their relevance to the law, medical malpractice, and the role of the courts in defining and applying standards of care. We will cover an array of interesting and challenging issues over the course of the semester, including the meaning of health, the nature of the physician-patient relationship, including privacy, access to care, and informed consent, public health, reproductive and genetic technologies, and end-of-life care. This class has a heavy discussion component and students are expected to come to class prepared to engage in an in-depth conversation about the assigned material. To that end, students enrolled in this course will become well-versed in the theory underlying the law and policy we study, as well as the black letter law.

5297 Fraud & Abuse - CLARK (offered in Fall  2014)
This course examines the federal and state laws imposing criminal and civil penalties on health care providers for a variety of fraudulent activities. The course explores the implications of the federal and state Anti-Kickback Laws, the federal anti-referral (Stark) law, the federal civil monetary penalty and exclusion laws, the federal and state false claims laws, as well as traditional federal white collar criminal laws as applied to health care.

5297 Government and Nonprofit Externship I - BONADERO (offered in Summer IV  2016)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements at either a nonprofit organization or a government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. If the placement where a student wishes to work for credit is not on the approved list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting a position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditation regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The LEX consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Government and Nonprofit Externship I - BONADERO (offered in Summer II  2016)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements at either a nonprofit organization or a government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. If the placement where a student wishes to work for credit is not on the approved list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting a position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditation regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The LEX consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Government and Nonprofit Externship I - BONADERO (offered in Spring  2016)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements at either a nonprofit organization or a government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. If the placement where a student wishes to work for credit is not on the approved list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting a position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditation regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The LEX consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Government and Nonprofit Externship I (Name in PeopleSoft will appear as - BONADERO (offered in Fall  2015)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements at either a nonprofit organization or a government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. If the placement where a student wishes to work for credit is not on the approved list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting a position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditation regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The LEX consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Government and Nonprofit Externship I (Name in PeopleSoft will appear as" Clinic Externship I" - BONADERO (offered in Spring  2015)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements at either a nonprofit organization or a government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage. If the placement where a student wishes to work for credit is not on the approved list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting a position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditation regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The LEX consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Government and Nonprofit Externship II - BONADERO (offered in Spring  2016)
Well in advance of the semester in which they want to work, students should secure their field placements at either a nonprofit organization or government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage at www.law.uh.edu/externship. If the placement which a student wishes to work for credit is NOT on the list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting an position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditations regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students taking an Externship II course have necessarily already completed Externship I; consequently, s/he does not need to attend an orientation prior to starting work. However, Externship II students must still comply with all other externship requirements (time logs, journal entries and/or reflective writing assignments, completion of evaluations, and possibly a face-to-face meeting with the ED.) Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Government and Nonprofit Externship II - BONADERO (offered in Summer II  2016)
Well in advance of the semester in which they want to work, students should secure their field placements at either a nonprofit organization or government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage at www.law.uh.edu/externship. If the placement which a student wishes to work for credit is NOT on the list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting an position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditations regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students taking an Externship II course have necessarily already completed Externship I; consequently, s/he does not need to attend an orientation prior to starting work. However, Externship II students must still comply with all other externship requirements (time logs, journal entries and/or reflective writing assignments, completion of evaluations, and possibly a face-to-face meeting with the ED.) Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Government and Nonprofit Externship II - BONADERO (offered in Summer IV  2016)
Well in advance of the semester in which they want to work, students should secure their field placements at either a nonprofit organization or government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage at www.law.uh.edu/externship. If the placement which a student wishes to work for credit is NOT on the list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting an position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditations regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students taking an Externship II course have necessarily already completed Externship I; consequently, s/he does not need to attend an orientation prior to starting work. However, Externship II students must still comply with all other externship requirements (time logs, journal entries and/or reflective writing assignments, completion of evaluations, and possibly a face-to-face meeting with the ED.) Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Government and Nonprofit Externship II (Name in Peoplesoft will appear as "Clinic Externship II") - BONADERO (offered in Fall  2015)
Well in advance of the semester in which they want to work, students should secure their field placements at either a nonprofit organization or government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage at www.law.uh.edu/externship. If the placement which a student wishes to work for credit is NOT on the list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting an position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditations regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students taking an Externship II course have necessarily already completed Externship I; consequently, s/he does not need to attend an orientation prior to starting work. However, Externship II students must still comply with all other externship requirements (time logs, journal entries and/or reflective writing assignments, completion of evaluations, and possibly a face-to-face meeting with the ED.) Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Government and Nonprofit Externship II (Name in PeopleSoft will appear as “Clinic Externship II”) - BONADERO (offered in Spring  2015)
Well in advance of the semester in which they want to work, students should secure their field placements at either a nonprofit organization or government agency. A list of preapproved placements is located on the Externship Program’s webpage. If the placement which a student wishes to work for credit is NOT on the list, s/he must seek approval from the Externship Director before accepting an position at that placement. (Students working at law firms, even on a volunteer basis, cannot receive credit under ABA accreditations regulations.) Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the program at www.law.uh.edu/clnic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in the course via PeopleSoft. If you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Student Services Office. Students taking an Externship II course have necessarily already completed Externship I; consequently, s/he does not need to attend an orientation prior to starting work. However, Externship II students must still comply with all other externship requirements (time logs, journal entries, completion of evaluations, and possibly a face-to-face meeting with the ED.) Requires student to work at placement for a minimum of 120 hours over the semester

5397 Health Industry Basics: Providers-Innovators-Regulators - EVANS (offered in Fall  2015)
This core health law course is an introductory tour of Texas/federal laws governing health-sector businesses that together account for 18% U.S. Gross Domestic Product, including traditional 20th-century institutions like hospitals and an expanding array of new players that supply innovative products (drugs, devices, diagnostics) and services (clinical laboratories, biobanks, contract research organizations, health data exchanges, management and informational services) to healthcare providers and—increasingly—directly to consumers. This course acquaints students with the core corporate client base for large-firm and in-house health lawyers; introduces major regulatory frameworks that struggle to safeguard consumers’ rights vis-ŕ-vis commercial health-sector enterprises; and identifies big, unsettled questions likely to generate opportunities for practical, solution-oriented lawyers as this staid and troubled industry gropes for new business models in the era of big data and 21st-century genomic and “informational” medicine. No prerequisites required other than completion of 1L courses.

5397 Health Industry Basics: Providers-Innovators-Regulators - EVANS (offered in Fall  2014)
This new core health law course is an introductory tour of Texas/federal laws governing health-sector businesses that together account for 18% U.S. Gross Domestic Product, including traditional 20th-century institutions like hospitals and an expanding array of new players that supply innovative products (drugs, devices, diagnostics) and services (clinical laboratories, biobanks, contract research organizations, health data exchanges, management and informational services) to healthcare providers and—increasingly—directly to consumers. This course acquaints students with the core corporate client base for large-firm and in-house health lawyers; introduces major regulatory frameworks that struggle to safeguard consumers’ rights vis-ŕ-vis commercial health-sector enterprises; and identifies big, unsettled questions likely to generate opportunities for practical, solution-oriented lawyers as this staid and troubled industry gropes for new business models in the era of big data and 21st-century genomic and “informational” medicine. No prerequisites required other than completion of 1L courses.

5197 Health Law Research - LAWSON (offered in Spring  2017)
This is a specialized course on health law research. It will focus on federal and state primary legal materials related to health law, including relevant statutes, regulations, agency guidance and decisions, and case law. Secondary sources such as treatises and practice guides specific to health law will also be discussed.

5197 Health Law Research - LAWSON (offered in Spring  2016)
This is a specialized course on health law research. It will focus on federal and state primary legal materials related to health law, including relevant statutes, regulations, agency guidance and decisions, and case law. Secondary sources such as treatises and practice guides specific to health law will also be discussed.

5297 Health Legislation & Advocacy I - GRAY/WINNIKE (offered in Fall  2016)
This course is the first part of a two-semester course offered in alternate academic years. Students desiring to enroll are required to take both semesters. The fall semester will focus on the health policy development process, including researching and drafting a policy proposal on behalf of a non-profit community partner. Students will learn the skills to determine the best method to advance the policy proposal, whether through legislation or rulemaking. Grading will be based on several practical writing assignments (including a legal memorandum outlining the policy issue and possible solutions, a draft of proposed legislation, community support proposal, a letter to community partner, and a letter to a legislator).

5297 Health Legislation & Advocacy I - GRAY/WINNIKE (offered in Fall  2014)
This course is the first part of a two-semester course offered in alternate academic years. Students desiring to enroll are required to take both semesters. The fall semester will focus on the health policy development process, including researching and drafting a policy proposal on behalf of a non-profit community partner. Students will learn the skills to determine the best method to advance the policy proposal, whether through legislation or rulemaking. Grading will be based on several practical writing assignments (including a legal memorandum outlining the policy issue and possible solutions, a draft of proposed legislation, community support proposal, a letter to community partner, and a letter to a legislator).

5297 Health Legislation & Advocacy II - GRAY/WINNIKE (offered in Spring  2015)
This course is the second part of a two-semester course. The spring semester will focus on monitoring and participating in health legislation before the Texas 84th Legislature Regular Session. Students will monitor and provide support for the policy proposal developed in the fall semester course, track and report on other health legislation, and follow the actions of health-related committees. Grading will be based on several practical writing assignments (including drafting committee testimony, amendment language, community education article, legislative sponsor’s talking points, committee business tracking, and a health legislative summary). This course satisfies the Skills Course Requirement. Prerequisite: Health Legislation & Advocacy I.

5297 Health Legislation & Advocacy II - GRAY/WINNIKE (offered in Spring  2017)
This course is the second part of a two-semester course. The spring semester will focus on monitoring and participating in health legislation before the Texas 84th Legislature Regular Session. Students will monitor and provide support for the policy proposal developed in the fall semester course, track and report on other health legislation, and follow the actions of health-related committees. Grading will be based on several practical writing assignments (including drafting committee testimony, amendment language, community education article, legislative sponsor’s talking points, committee business tracking, and a health legislative summary). This course satisfies the Skills Course Requirement. Prerequisite: Health Legislation & Advocacy I.

5297 HIPAA - EWER (offered in Fall  2016)
This course is designed to help you understand the HIPAA Privacy Rule, and will look at the requirements of covered entities, business associates, and subcontractors. The course will start with an overview of HIPAA, and achieve an understanding of who is and who is not a covered entity, what constitutes protected health information, and how protected health information can and cannot be used or disclosed within the HIPAA rule. The course will look beyond individual rights to public policy exceptions within the rule, and will look at when protected health information may be used or disclosed without specific permission, when oral permission is sufficient, and when written disclosure is required. Limitations to disclosure for marketing and fundraising purposes will be discussed, as will specific requirements for psychotherapy notes. Notification requirements with regard to breaches and complaints as well as other administrative requirements will also be discussed. The course will use handout material and linked references; students will be required to prepare these assigned readings. A midterm written examination will be given, and will count toward the final grade, as will a two-hour written final examination. Class participation and level of preparation may be counted toward the final grade.

5397 Hot Topics in FDA Law - EVANS (offered in Fall  2016)
This course provides a practice-oriented basic survey of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, a surprisingly comprehensive federal consumer safety framework that regulates not just medical products but microwave ovens, computer screens, nanoparticles in make-up, genetically modified foods, dietary supplements and a dizzying array of other products that together account for 1 in 4 dollars spent in the U.S. economy. The course then takes a deeper look at current controversies such as FDA’s ability to block dying patients’ access to unapproved therapies; FDA’s oversight of gene editing technologies that may move into human clinical trials as early as 2017; concerns about the safety of commonly used cosmetics; FDA’s recurring collisions with the First Amendment; white collar crime in drug marketing; and other controversies yet to emerge. No prerequisites or scientific background required. This course is suitable for any student who may work in, or represent, consumer products manufacturers in the future.

5397 Human Resources: Advanced Issues in Employment Law - SULENTIC (offered in Spring  2016)
This course will familiarize students with the legal issues involved in the management of human resources in the modern workplace. Topics will include (i) drafting and negotiation of individual employment agreements, (ii) drafting and implementation of benefits and compensation policies, (iii) drafting and interpretation of employee communications, including employee handbooks, (iv) labor and employment issues in corporate transactions, (v) workplace investigations and internal resolution of problems in the workplace, and (vi) global employment challenges for multinational corporations. Students will propose and analyze solutions to problems discussed in class and will prepare and submit drafts of documents or portions of documents relevant to the resolution of these problems. Grades will be based on written assignments due throughout the semester.

5397 Human Resources: Advanced Issues in Employment Law - SULENTIC (offered in Spring  2015)
This course will familiarize students with the legal issues involved in the management of human resources in the modern workplace. Topics will include (i) drafting and negotiation of individual employment agreements, (ii) drafting and implementation of benefits and compensation policies, (iii) drafting and interpretation of employee communications, including employee handbooks, (iv) labor and employment issues in corporate transactions, (v) workplace investigations and internal resolution of problems in the workplace, and (vi) global employment challenges for multinational corporations. Students will propose and analyze solutions to problems discussed in class and will prepare and submit drafts of documents or portions of documents relevant to the resolution of these problems. Grades will be based on written assignments due throughout the semester.

5397 Human Resources: Advanced Issues in Employment Law - SULENTIC (offered in Spring  2017)
This course will familiarize students with the legal issues involved in the management of human resources in the modern workplace. Topics will include (i) drafting and negotiation of individual employment agreements, (ii) drafting and implementation of benefits and compensation policies, (iii) drafting and interpretation of employee communications, including employee handbooks, (iv) labor and employment issues in corporate transactions, (v) workplace investigations and internal resolution of problems in the workplace, and (vi) global employment challenges for multinational corporations. Students will propose and analyze solutions to problems discussed in class and will prepare and submit drafts of documents or portions of documents relevant to the resolution of these problems. Grades will be based on written assignments due throughout the semester.

5297 Human Trafficking Law - GALLAGHER (offered in Fall  2014)
This class will focus on human trafficking and related federal criminal immigration issues facing local communities, states, the federal government, and the international community. We will cover legal and public awareness measures that are taken to prevent, deter, and respond to human trafficking, including the social service organizations that are critical to the restoring victims and preparing witnesses in trafficking cases. The class will begin by focusing on the legal definitions and framework of trafficking and move to an historical overview of state and federal laws passed to address trafficking offenses, involving both U.S. citizens and immigrants placed into labor servitude or the commercial sex trade by force, fraud, or coercion. The Trafficking Victim’s Protection Act and its eleven years of progress will be covered along with the visas and witness issues that are common with trafficking victims. During the class you will see how this framework guides the United States’ effort to combat human trafficking in both domestic and international forms. There will be guest speakers from time to time who will be announced.

5297 Human Trafficking Law - GALLAGHER (offered in Spring  2015)
This class will focus on human trafficking and related federal criminal immigration issues facing local communities, states, the federal government, and the international community. We will cover legal and public awareness measures that are taken to prevent, deter, and respond to human trafficking, including the social service organizations that are critical to the restoring victims and preparing witnesses in trafficking cases. The class will begin by focusing on the legal definitions and framework of trafficking and move to an historical overview of state and federal laws passed to address trafficking offenses, involving both U.S. citizens and immigrants placed into labor servitude or the commercial sex trade by force, fraud, or coercion. The Trafficking Victim’s Protection Act and its eleven years of progress will be covered along with the visas and witness issues that are common with trafficking victims. During the class you will see how this framework guides the United States’ effort to combat human trafficking in both domestic and international forms. There will be guest speakers from time to time who will be announced.

5397 Immigration and Family Law - HEPPARD/BECK (offered in Spring  2014)
In this class, students will learn about and work individually and in groups to find legal solutions to hypothetical situations where family-based immigration law and family law (e.g. marriage, divorce, adoption, domestic violence, the Hague Convention and Suits Affecting the Parent Child Relationship) intersect. They will develop practical skills that will enable them to successfully represent clients who are seeking immigration benefits through a family member while learning the areas of family law that may affect their immigration client.

5297 Immigration Law - HEW (offered in Fall  2015)
This elective course is designed to introduce students to the many facets of immigration law including the federal immigration power, citizenship, admissions, family and employment-based immigration, deportation/removal, refugees/asylum, employer sanctions and anti-discrimination, and other current topics in the great immigration debate. We will study the history of immigration law and policy, constitutional and international law foundations underlying Congressional statutes and regulations, the administrative process and the role of courts in immigration litigation. Student learning will be assessed through class participation and final examination.

5297 International Arbitration Advocacy - ROBERTSON/CARSON/HARRELL (offered in Fall  2016)
International arbitration is a growing field and increasingly is the mechanism by which the largest international commercial disputes are resolved. This course has two primary aims: (1) to expose students to international arbitration practice; and (2) to provide students with the skills they need to represent clients effectively in international commercial arbitrations. The backbone of the course will be a mock arbitration with the students advocating the entire matter through each stage of the arbitration process.

5297 International Corporate Compliance - McCONNELL/BAKER/BUSTAMANTE (offered in Spring  2016)
Corporate compliance, one of the fastest growing markets for legal services, is the way organizations manage risk areas ranging from corruption to data privacy. This class will teach students how to use empirical data to develop a risk based approach to compliance. The course will begin with an overview of some of the risk areas driving the increased focus on compliance including global corruption, data privacy, trade controls, and environmental risk. Students will learn how to analyze empirical data to build a compliance program to address these risks. Guest speakers will include in house counsel with deep compliance experience who will discuss a variety of different compliance topics.

5297 International Corporate Compliance - McCONNELL (offered in Spring  2017)
Corporate compliance, one of the fastest growing markets for legal services, is the way organizations manage risk areas ranging from corruption to data privacy. This class will teach students how to use empirical data to develop a risk based approach to compliance. The course will begin with an overview of some of the risk areas driving the increased focus on compliance including global corruption, data privacy, trade controls, and environmental risk. Students will learn how to analyze empirical data to build a compliance program to address these risks. Guest speakers will include in house counsel with deep compliance experience who will discuss a variety of different compliance topics.

5397 International Energy Law - WARREN (offered in Spring  2017)

5297 International Intellectual Property - COLMENTER (offered in Spring  2016)
This course examines, analyzes and studies the remarkable subject of International Intellectual Property Law and how to enforce trademarks, patents and copyrights beyond national boundaries. Special emphasis will be placed on international standards for intellectual property and its implementation, application and practices in national jurisdictions. In addition the course covers the differences and similarities between the diverse national intellectual property systems. The course will be divided into six major blocks: a. Overview and Introductory Themes. b. International Copyright and Neighboring Rights. c. International Patent Law. d. International Trademarks and Geographical Indications. e. Unfair Competition and Trade Secrets. f. International Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights.

5297 International Intellectual Property - COLMENTER (offered in Spring  2017)
This course examines, analyzes and studies the remarkable subject of International Intellectual Property Law and how to enforce trademarks, patents and copyrights beyond national boundaries. Special emphasis will be placed on international standards for intellectual property and its implementation, application and practices in national jurisdictions. In addition the course covers the differences and similarities between the diverse national intellectual property systems. The course will be divided into six major blocks: a. Overview and Introductory Themes. b. International Copyright and Neighboring Rights. c. International Patent Law. d. International Trademarks and Geographical Indications. e. Unfair Competition and Trade Secrets. f. International Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights.

5397 International Risk Management - DIMITROFF/SILVA (offered in Fall  2015)
This course will look at the legal framework for international oilfield service contracts, including both substantive law and practical counseling. The issues and solutions discussed in this course will be similar to those that arise in many other international agreements for the sale of services, which commonly form the substance of much international legal work in Houston. The course would be divided into three basic segments: 1. The first part of the course will set forth the background of international oilfield services contracts, including a review of the underlying treaties, statutes and regulations applicable to these contracts. These would include treaties and laws regulating the creation of oilfield projects, including international trade agreements, such as the WTO. This part will also include a series of discussions and reading assignments relating to enforcement, through litigation or arbitration, of international energy projects, including the New York Convention for Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards, extraterritorial aspects of U.S. law, and conflict of laws and comparative law issues (e.g., differences between the law of the United States and England, as well as the general principals of law in common law and civil law countries). 2. The second part of the course will involve analysis of a specific hypothetical drilling agreement. We will use a format that involves the client having negotiated the basic terms of the agreement, which must then be dealt with by the attorneys for the client. The class will assist in the initial evaluation of the deal to advise the client concerning the risks that the company has undertaken. 3. The third part of the course will involve an analysis of problems that arise under the hypothetical drilling agreement, including: counseling of the client as the drilling commences and problems begin to arise; counseling the client and assisting the client them in protecting the company’s interests as the contract begins to slide towards dispute resolution; the conduct of the arbitration, with an emphasis on the strategic elements thereof. This will include multi-national mechanisms for the protection of assets. In each of the above stages, the General Counsel for the client will provide feedback to the class concerning the pragmatic, practical steps that should be taken to protect the client’s interest. The senior partners of your firm will serve as your mentor as to the substantive legal issues before you. The students will be given a project in which they will draft relevant contract provisions based on the materials taught in the first part of the course. The work will be discussed in class, citing specific “client issues and goals.” The students will participate in teams and will then be asked to redraft the provisions to provide solutions. A “model redraft” of the contract will then be given to the class. The students will be graded in two parts. First, they will be asked to analyze the “model redraft” provisions based on the legal issues and rules matters studied during the the course. This portion of the course will count for 20% of the final grade. Second, 80 percent of the grade will be based on a final exam that will be comprehensive and will cover the entire course material.

5397 International Risk Management - DIMITROFF (offered in Fall  2016)
This course will look at the legal framework for international oilfield service contracts, including both substantive law and practical counseling. The issues and solutions discussed in this course will be similar to those that arise in many other international agreements for the sale of services, which commonly form the substance of much international legal work in Houston. The course would be divided into three basic segments: 1. The first part of the course will set forth the background of international oilfield services contracts, including a review of the underlying treaties, statutes and regulations applicable to these contracts. These would include treaties and laws regulating the creation of oilfield projects, including international trade agreements, such as the WTO. This part will also include a series of discussions and reading assignments relating to enforcement, through litigation or arbitration, of international energy projects, including the New York Convention for Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards, extraterritorial aspects of U.S. law, and conflict of laws and comparative law issues (e.g., differences between the law of the United States and England, as well as the general principals of law in common law and civil law countries). 2. The second part of the course will involve analysis of a specific hypothetical drilling agreement. We will use a format that involves the client having negotiated the basic terms of the agreement, which must then be dealt with by the attorneys for the client. The class will assist in the initial evaluation of the deal to advise the client concerning the risks that the company has undertaken. 3. The third part of the course will involve an analysis of problems that arise under the hypothetical drilling agreement, including: counseling of the client as the drilling commences and problems begin to arise; counseling the client and assisting the client them in protecting the company’s interests as the contract begins to slide towards dispute resolution; the conduct of the arbitration, with an emphasis on the strategic elements thereof. This will include multi-national mechanisms for the protection of assets. In each of the above stages, the General Counsel for the client will provide feedback to the class concerning the pragmatic, practical steps that should be taken to protect the client’s interest. The senior partners of your firm will serve as your mentor as to the substantive legal issues before you. The students will be given a project in which they will draft relevant contract provisions based on the materials taught in the first part of the course. The work will be discussed in class, citing specific “client issues and goals.” The students will participate in teams and will then be asked to redraft the provisions to provide solutions. A “model redraft” of the contract will then be given to the class. The students will be graded in two parts. First, they will be asked to analyze the “model redraft” provisions based on the legal issues and rules matters studied during the the course. This portion of the course will count for 20% of the final grade. Second, 80 percent of the grade will be based on a final exam that will be comprehensive and will cover the entire course material.

5397 International Risk Management - DIMITROFF/VOLKER/SILVA (offered in Fall  2014)
This course will look at the legal framework for international oilfield service contracts, including both substantive law and practical counseling. The issues and solutions discussed in this course will be similar to those that arise in many other international agreements for the sale of services, which commonly form the substance of much international legal work in Houston. The course would be divided into three basic segments: 1. The first part of the course will set forth the background of international oilfield services contracts, including a review of the underlying treaties, statutes and regulations applicable to these contracts. These would include treaties and laws regulating the creation of oilfield projects, including international trade agreements, such as the WTO. This part will also include a series of discussions and reading assignments relating to enforcement, through litigation or arbitration, of international energy projects, including the New York Convention for Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Arbitral Awards, extraterritorial aspects of U.S. law, and conflict of laws and comparative law issues (e.g., differences between the law of the United States and England, as well as the general principals of law in common law and civil law countries). 2. The second part of the course will involve analysis of a specific hypothetical drilling agreement. We will use a format that involves the client having negotiated the basic terms of the agreement, which must then be dealt with by the attorneys for the client. The class will assist in the initial evaluation of the deal to advise the client concerning the risks that the company has undertaken. 3. The third part of the course will involve an analysis of problems that arise under the hypothetical drilling agreement, including: counseling of the client as the drilling commences and problems begin to arise; counseling the client and assisting the client them in protecting the company’s interests as the contract begins to slide towards dispute resolution; the conduct of the arbitration, with an emphasis on the strategic elements thereof. This will include multi-national mechanisms for the protection of assets. In each of the above stages, the General Counsel for the client will provide feedback to the class concerning the pragmatic, practical steps that should be taken to protect the client’s interest. The senior partners of your firm will serve as your mentor as to the substantive legal issues before you. The students will be given a project in which they will draft relevant contract provisions based on the materials taught in the first part of the course. The work will be discussed in class, citing specific “client issues and goals.” The students will participate in teams and will then be asked to redraft the provisions to provide solutions. A “model redraft” of the contract will then be given to the class. The students will be graded in two parts. First, they will be asked to analyze the “model redraft” provisions based on the legal issues and rules matters studied during the the course. This portion of the course will count for 20% of the final grade. Second, 80 percent of the grade will be based on a final exam that will be comprehensive and will cover the entire course material.

5297 Introduction to Finance Concepts for Law students - BRENNAN (offered in Spring  2014)
This 2-credit course is designed to provide law students with no prior course work in business finance an introduction to financial statements and the essential foundations of corporate finance and accounting. The course technically begins on Saturday, March 8 (though there is no class meeting that day; just an initial email contact and the first day assignment to be given). There will be four class meetings over spring break, the first class beginning Monday, March 10 and going through Thursday March 13. Each class will run from 9:00 am – 3:00 pm (note: the Law Center will buy everyone lunch during these four class days). The following topics will be introduced: how financial statement information is used and analyzed and how the information is accounted for and derived in the form of financial statements; time value of money; valuation of cash flows; discounted cash flow analysis for investment decisions and valuation of securities; market efficiency; cost of capital, methods of raising equity and debt capital, and introduction to basic financial statements. In-class discussion of the course material and assigned problems will be used to provide an active learning experience for students. Exam: The exam will be a take home exam, to be handed out at the end of class on Thursday March 13 for students to return by Monday March 17.

5297 Introduction to Finance Concepts for Law Students - BRENNAN (offered in Spring  2015)
This 2-credit course is designed to provide law students with no prior course work in business finance an introduction to financial statements and the essential foundations of corporate finance and accounting. The following topics will be introduced: how financial statement information is used and analyzed and how the information is accounted for and derived in the form of financial statements; time value of money; valuation of cash flows; discounted cash flow analysis for investment decisions and valuation of securities; market efficiency; cost of capital, methods of raising equity and debt capital, and introduction to basic financial statements. In-class discussion of the course material and assigned problems will be used to provide an active learning experience for students. The course in Session 5 technically begins on Tuesday, March 24. There will be four class meetings over spring break: First class begins on Monday, March 16 and goes through Thursday March 19. Each class will run from 9:00 am – 3:00 pm (note: the Law Center will buy everyone lunch during these four class days). Exam: The exam will be a take home exam, to be handed out at the end of class on Thursday March 19 for students to return by Monday March 23, 2015.

5297 Introduction to Finance Concepts for Law Students - BRENNAN (offered in Spring  2016)
This 2-credit course is designed to provide law students with no prior course work in business finance an introduction to financial statements and the essential foundations of corporate finance and accounting. The following topics will be introduced: how financial statement information is used and analyzed and how the information is accounted for and derived in the form of financial statements; time value of money; valuation of cash flows; discounted cash flow analysis for investment decisions and valuation of securities; market efficiency; cost of capital, methods of raising equity and debt capital, and introduction to basic financial statements. In-class discussion of the course material and assigned problems will be used to provide an active learning experience for students. The course in Session 5 technically begins on Tuesday, March 24. There will be four class meetings over spring break: Class Days: Monday, March 14, 2016 to Thursday March 17, 2016. Each class will run from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm. 1 Hour lunch and 10 minute breaks daily. Exam: The exam will be a take home exam, to be handed out at the end of class on Thursday March 17 for students to return by Monday March 21, 2016.

5397 Introduction to Islamic Law - SHAIKH (offered in Spring  2015)
This course will offer an introduction to the development of Islamic jurisprudence through comparative and historical approaches, emphasizing the interaction between law and society. Some of the course materials and assignments will be designed to meet the interests of students. Active and creative engagement with the materials is expected, but no previous familiarity with Islam is necessary.

5297 Introduction to the Law of Mexico - PINTO-LEON (offered in Spring  2015)
This course will provide a general introduction to the Mexican legal system. Topics to be covered will include an overview of Mexican legal history; Mexican constitutional law; the Mexican judicial system; introduction to civil and commercial law; real estate law; civil procedure; and criminal law. The course will also include an introduction to conducting basic research on Mexican law. We will also cover transborder litigation and enforcement of foreign judgments in Mexico The grade for this course will be determined by students' performance on 2-hour open book final exam.

5397 Introduction to the Laws of European Union - WILLIS (offered in Summer II  2014)
In this course, which satisfies the practice skills requirement, students will gain an insight into the way in which the law of the European Union (European Community law) impacts the business community at a national and international level. The European Union now represents a vast market and a window of opportunity for business and commerce. The course will be graded on a series of short and practical written assignments, which will guide students through the drafting of a basic contract enforceable within the European Union. There will be three contractual drafting assignments that will be designed to build upon each other so that the fourth and final assignment will result in a draft of a complete contract. Class participation will also count toward student grades. The aim of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of how the European Union uses the law as a means to achieve market objectives through national and international business transactions .To this end the class will examine the basic components lawyers need to know when preparing to draft contracts involving EU member states: • the emergence of the European Economic Community • how the European Union is administered/governed by the four main institutions • the sources and general principles of the European Community law • how European Community law is integrated at a national level • the contributions of the Court of Justice to this process • how European community law is enforced at both a national and European level. The class is will meet regularly during the Summer II session, which runs from June 2 – July 8, 2014.

5397 Introduction to the Laws of European Union - WILLIS (offered in Summer II  2015)
In this course, which satisfies the practice skills requirement, students will gain an insight into the way in which the law of the European Union (European Community law) impacts the business community at a national and international level. The European Union now represents a vast market and a window of opportunity for business and commerce. The course will be graded on a series of short and practical written assignments, which will guide students through the drafting of a basic contract enforceable within the European Union. There will be three contractual drafting assignments that will be designed to build upon each other so that the fourth and final assignment will result in a draft of a complete contract. Class participation will also count toward student grades. The aim of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of how the European Union uses the law as a means to achieve market objectives through national and international business transactions .To this end the class will examine the basic components lawyers need to know when preparing to draft contracts involving EU member states: • the emergence of the European Economic Community • how the European Union is administered/governed by the four main institutions • the sources and general principles of the European Community law • how European Community law is integrated at a national level • the contributions of the Court of Justice to this process • how European community law is enforced at both a national and European level. The class is will meet regularly during the Summer II session.

5397 Introduction to the Laws of European Union - WILLIS (offered in Summer II  2016)
In this course, which satisfies the practice skills requirement, students will gain an insight into the way in which the law of the European Union (European Community law) impacts the business community at a national and international level. The European Union now represents a vast market and a window of opportunity for business and commerce. The course will be graded on a series of short and practical written assignments, which will guide students through the drafting of a basic contract enforceable within the European Union. There will be three contractual drafting assignments that will be designed to build upon each other so that the fourth and final assignment will result in a draft of a complete contract. Class participation will also count toward student grades. The aim of this course is to provide students with a basic understanding of how the European Union uses the law as a means to achieve market objectives through national and international business transactions .To this end the class will examine the basic components lawyers need to know when preparing to draft contracts involving EU member states: • the emergence of the European Economic Community • how the European Union is administered/governed by the four main institutions • the sources and general principles of the European Community law • how European Community law is integrated at a national level • the contributions of the Court of Justice to this process • how European community law is enforced at both a national and European level. The class is will meet regularly during the Summer II session.

5297 Introduction to Transnational Law - TRAIN (offered in Spring  2015)
1) Introduction § definition of basic notions and mechanisms of Private International Law (International Law, Transnational Law, International situation or dispute; conflict of laws ; “conflict of jurisdiction”; forum shopping, Law shopping, “international public policy”, “lois de police” or (overriding) mandatory rules, Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments or Arbitral Awards, International Commercial Arbitration vs Investment Arbitration, etc.) § Various Methods to rule an international situation: the Conflict of Law Rules Method; The Substantial Rules Method; The “Lois de police” Method; The Recognition Method (comp. Vested Rights Theory) 2) The European Union Regulations on Conflict of laws and Jurisdictions § Overview of all the instruments, i.e. Regulations Rome I, II and II (forthcoming IV) on conflict of laws and Brussels I and II on conflict of jurisdictions § The issue of extraterritoriality of UE regulations 3) International contracts – I – Which Court has jurisdiction ? (choice of forum clause, Brussels I, 2005 The Hague Convention) II- Which law applies (choice of law clause or determination by the court or arbitral tribunals – The 1980 CISG Convention – The Lex Mercatoria; lois de police) III- Recognition and Enforcement of Foreign Judgments and Arbitral Awards : conditions under European Law / National Laws 4) Family Law : different kinds of issues, i.e. : whether muslim notions should be recognized in France (such as repudiation, polygamy); whether one can ask that a right that has been granted to him/her in a foreign country while such right could not have been granted in France, be then recognized in France (vested rights theory vs fraud or forum shopping abuse / surrogate mother).

5297 Introduction to Transnational Law - Hoffman L (offered in Spring  2014)
Note that while Dean Hoffman is listed as the lead instructor for this class, Dr. Joasia Lusak of the University of Amsterdam will teach the class sessions. The aim of the course is to introduce the concepts and methods that make up transnational legal studies. Selected aspects of comparative, international, and global law will be studied not only on the basis of theoretical readings, but also through practical examples and case studies drawn from very different legal disciplines. First classes are devoted to a general presentation of the components of transnational law and its issues, e.g., multilingualism. Thereafter, three main topics will be analyzed from both a theoretical and a practical perspective: (1) dispute settlement in a globalized market on an example of the WTO dispute settlement system; (2) jurisdiction issues in transnational conflicts – e.g., what court has jurisdiction or what law applies in a transnational conflict; and (3) transborder sales law – through the discussion of such regulatory measures as the CISG (Vienna Sales Convention), the UCC (Uniform Commercial Code) and the CESL (Common European Sales Law).

5297 Judicial Externship I - BONADERO/ARCHER/WORRELL (offered in Summer IV  2014)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for judge outside of Houston over the summer, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Internship Program at www.law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever judicial internship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading the Daily Lex consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available, as well as reading the Daily Lex consistently. students must work a minimum of 180 hours to receive 3 credits.

5297 Judicial Externship I - BONADERO/ARCHER/WORRELL (offered in Summer II  2014)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for judge outside of Houston over the summer, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Internship Program at www.law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever judicial internship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading the Daily Lex consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available, as well as reading the Daily Lex consistently. students must work a minimum of 180 hours to receive 3 credits.

5297 Judicial Externship I - BONADERO (offered in Spring  2015)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for judge outside of Houston, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever judicial externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The Lex consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Judicial Externship I - BONADERO/ARCHER/WORRELL (offered in Summer IV  2015)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for judge outside of Houston, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever judicial externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The Lex consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Judicial Externship I - BONADERO (offered in Fall  2015)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for judge outside of Houston, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever judicial externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The Lex consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Judicial Externship I - BONADERO/ARCHER/WORRELL (offered in Summer II  2015)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for judge outside of Houston, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever judicial externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The Lex consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Judicial Externship I - BONADERO/ARCHER/WORRELL (offered in Summer IV  2016)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for judge outside of Houston, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever judicial externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The Lex consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Judicial Externship I - BONADERO/ARCHER/WORRELL (offered in Summer II  2016)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for judge outside of Houston, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever judicial externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The Lex consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Judicial Externship I - BONADERO (offered in Spring  2016)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for judge outside of Houston, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship/. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Any JD student doing his/her first-ever judicial externship for credit is required to attend an on-campus orientation. The date/time of the orientation is TBD. Students are responsible for reading their law school email and The Lex consistently to keep up with this information as it becomes available. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Judicial Externship II - BONADERO (offered in Spring  2016)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for a judge outside of Houston over the summer, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students in this course do not need to attend an orientation, as they have already completed Judicial Externship I. Students will still be responsible for submitting journal entries and/or reflective writing assignments, time logs, and evaluations, and possibly attending an in-person meeting with the ED over the course of the semester. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Judicial Externship II - BONADERO/ARCHER/WORRELL (offered in Summer II  2016)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for a judge outside of Houston over the summer, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students in this course do not need to attend an orientation, as they have already completed Judicial Externship I. Students will still be responsible for submitting journal entries and/or reflective writing assignments, time logs, and evaluations, and possibly attending an in-person meeting with the ED over the course of the semester. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Judicial Externship II - BONADERO/ARCHER/WORRELL (offered in Summer IV  2016)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for a judge outside of Houston over the summer, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students in this course do not need to attend an orientation, as they have already completed Judicial Externship I. Students will still be responsible for submitting journal entries and/or reflective writing assignments, time logs, and evaluations, and possibly attending an in-person meeting with the ED over the course of the semester. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Judicial Externship II - BONADERO/ARCHER/WORRELL (offered in Summer II  2015)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for a judge outside of Houston over the summer, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students in this course do not need to attend an orientation, as they have already completed Judicial Externship I. Students will still be responsible for submitting journal entries and/or reflective writing assignments, time logs, and evaluations, and possibly attending an in-person meeting with the ED over the course of the semester. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Judicial Externship II - BONADERO/ARCHER/WORRELL (offered in Summer IV  2015)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for a judge outside of Houston over the summer, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students in this course do not need to attend an orientation, as they have already completed Judicial Externship I. Students will still be responsible for submitting journal entries and/or reflective writing assignments, time logs, and evaluations, and possibly attending an in-person meeting with the ED over the course of the semester. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Judicial Externship II - BONADERO (offered in Fall  2015)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for a judge outside of Houston over the summer, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students in this course do not need to attend an orientation, as they have already completed Judicial Externship I. Students will still be responsible for submitting journal entries and/or reflective writing assignments, time logs, and evaluations, and possibly attending an in-person meeting with the ED over the course of the semester. Students will be required to work at their placements for 60 hours to earn each hour of academic credit.

5297 Judicial Externship II - BONADERO (offered in Spring  2015)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for a judge outside of Houston over the summer, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Externship Program at www.law.uh.edu/externship. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students in this course do not need to attend an orientation, as they have already completed Judicial Externship I. Students will still be responsible for submitting journal entries, time logs, and evaluations, and possibly attending an in-person meeting with the ED over the course of the semester. Students must work a minimum of 120 hours to receive 2 credits.

5297 Judicial Externship II - BONADERO/ARCHER/WORRELL (offered in Summer II  2014)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for judge outside of Houston over the summer, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Internship Program at www.law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students in this course do not need to attend an orientation, as they have already completed Judicial Internship I. Students will still be responsible for submitting journal entries, time logs, and evaluations, and possibly attending an in-person meeting with the ED over the course of the semester.

5297 Judicial Externship II - BONADERO/ARCHER/WORRELL (offered in Summer IV  2014)
Well in advance of the semester during which they want to work, students should secure their own field placements with a state or federal judge at either the district court or appellate court level. Many judges/justices in the Houston area participate as field placement supervisors, and welcome applications from Rising 2Ls, 2Ls, Rising 3Ls, and 3Ls. If a student wishes to work for judge outside of Houston over the summer, s/he should first contact the Externship Director to discuss the possibility, and should do so before accepting a position with that judge. Once a student secures a position, s/he must apply to the Judicial Internship Program at www.law.uh.edu/clinic. Students should not attempt to enroll themselves in these courses via PeopleSoft: if you’re approved, the Externship Director will enroll you via the Office of Student Services. Students in this course do not need to attend an orientation, as they have already completed Judicial Internship I. Students will still be responsible for submitting journal entries, time logs, and evaluations, and possibly attending an in-person meeting with the ED over the course of the semester.

5297 Juvenile Record Sealing I - DOW, KATYA (offered in Fall  2016)
Although a juvenile’s criminal record is generally considered to be automatically withheld from public access, such records, if not formally sealed or restricted, can be accessed by any person, agency, or institution having a “legitimate interest” in the matter. Access to juvenile records can create major barriers for the affected juveniles with respect to their efforts to obtain: (1) employment (2) financial aid, (3) housing, (4) public benefits, (5) educational and licensing opportunities, (5) military enlistment, and (6) many other benefits. Consequently, the existence of these records can make it difficult for persons with a juvenile record to get past youthful mistakes and improve their lives. This course will train law students in the procedure and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code/ Title 3. Juvenile Justice Code. In addition, students will learn applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. Finally, students will take the steps required to seal records of juveniles who are eligible for assistance. Students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible for sealing (as well as with their parent(s) or guardian(s) when appropriate or required), notify the appropriate state agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow.

5297 Juvenile Record Sealing I - DOW, KATYA (offered in Summer I  2016)
Although a juvenile’s criminal record is generally considered to be automatically withheld from public access, such records, if not formally sealed or restricted, can be accessed by any person, agency, or institution having a “legitimate interest” in the matter. Access to juvenile records can create major barriers for the affected juveniles with respect to their efforts to obtain: (1) employment (2) financial aid, (3) housing, (4) public benefits, (5) educational and licensing opportunities, (5) military enlistment, and (6) many other benefits. Consequently, the existence of these records can make it difficult for persons with a juvenile record to get past youthful mistakes and improve their lives. This course will train law students in the procedure and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code/ Title 3. Juvenile Justice Code. In addition, students will learn applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. Finally, students will take the steps required to seal records of juveniles who are eligible for assistance. Students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible for sealing (as well as with their parent(s) or guardian(s) when appropriate or required), notify the appropriate state agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow.

5297 Juvenile Record Sealing I - DOW, KATYA (offered in Spring  2017)
Although a juvenile’s criminal record is generally considered to be automatically withheld from public access, such records, if not formally sealed or restricted, can be accessed by any person, agency, or institution having a “legitimate interest” in the matter. Access to juvenile records can create major barriers for the affected juveniles with respect to their efforts to obtain: (1) employment (2) financial aid, (3) housing, (4) public benefits, (5) educational and licensing opportunities, (5) military enlistment, and (6) many other benefits. Consequently, the existence of these records can make it difficult for persons with a juvenile record to get past youthful mistakes and improve their lives. This course will train law students in the procedure and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code/ Title 3. Juvenile Justice Code. In addition, students will learn applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. Finally, students will take the steps required to seal records of juveniles who are eligible for assistance. Students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible for sealing (as well as with their parent(s) or guardian(s) when appropriate or required), notify the appropriate state agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow.

5297 Juvenile Record Sealing I - DOW, KATYA (offered in Spring  2016)
Although a juvenile’s criminal record is generally considered to be automatically withheld from public access, such records, if not formally sealed or restricted, can be accessed by any person, agency, or institution having a “legitimate interest” in the matter. Access to juvenile records can create major barriers for the affected juveniles with respect to their efforts to obtain: (1) financial aid, (2) housing, (3) public benefits, (4) educational and licensing opportunities, (5) employment, and (6) many other benefits. Consequently, the existence of these records can make it difficult for persons with a juvenile record to get past youthful mistakes and improve their lives. This course will train law students in the procedure and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code. In addition, students will learn applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. Finally, students will take the steps required to seal records of juveniles who are eligible for assistance . Students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible for sealing, as well as with their parent(s) or guardian(s) when appropriate or required; notify the appropriate state agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow.

5297 Juvenile Record Sealing I - DOW, KATYA (offered in Fall  2015)
Although a juvenile’s criminal record is generally considered to be automatically withheld from public access, such records, if not formally sealed or restricted, can be accessed by any person, agency, or institution having a “legitimate interest” in the matter. Access to juvenile records can create major barriers for the affected juveniles with respect to their efforts to obtain: (1) financial aid, (2) housing, (3) public benefits, (4) educational and licensing opportunities, (5) employment, and (6) many other benefits. Consequently, the existence of these records can make it difficult for persons with a juvenile record to get past youthful mistakes and improve their lives. This course will train law students in the procedure and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code. In addition, students will learn applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. Finally, students will take the steps required to seal records of juveniles who are eligible for assistance . Students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible for sealing, as well as with their parent(s) or guardian(s) when appropriate or required; notify the appropriate state agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow.

5197 Juvenile Record Sealing II - DOW, KATYA (offered in Fall  2015)
This course is a continuation of Juvenile Record Sealing I; students must have satisfactorily completed JRS I to enroll. In this class, students will continue to develop and refine the skills learned in JRS I. Specifically, under the supervision of Professor Dow, students will (i) acquire expertise in the procedures and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code, and (ii) become able to apply the applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. To accomplish these goals, students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible (as well as their parent(s) or guardian(s); notify the appropriate agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow. Students in JRS II will be given more advanced cases and be given more independence when negotiating cases with the district attorneys and speaking at hearings. Finally, students in JRS II may be paired with students from JRS I to assist them on initial cases.

5197 Juvenile Record Sealing II - DOW, KATYA (offered in Spring  2016)
This course is a continuation of Juvenile Record Sealing I; students must have satisfactorily completed JRS I to enroll. In this class, students will continue to develop and refine the skills learned in JRS I. Specifically, under the supervision of Professor Dow, students will (i) acquire expertise in the procedures and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code, and (ii) become able to apply the applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. To accomplish these goals, students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible (as well as their parent(s) or guardian(s); notify the appropriate agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow. Students in JRS II will be given more advanced cases and be given more independence when negotiating cases with the district attorneys and speaking at hearings. Finally, students in JRS II may be paired with students from JRS I to assist them on initial cases.

5197 Juvenile Record Sealing II - DOW, KATYA (offered in Spring  2017)
This course is a continuation of Juvenile Record Sealing I; students must have satisfactorily completed JRS I to enroll. In this class, students will continue to develop and refine the skills learned in JRS I. Specifically, under the supervision of Professor Dow, students will (i) acquire expertise in the procedures and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code, and (ii) become able to apply the applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. To accomplish these goals, students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible (as well as their parent(s) or guardian(s); notify the appropriate agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow. Students in JRS II will be given more advanced cases and be given more independence when negotiating cases with the district attorneys and speaking at hearings. Finally, students in JRS II may be paired with students from JRS I to assist them on initial cases.

5197 Juvenile Record Sealing II - DOW, KATYA (offered in Summer I  2016)
This course is a continuation of Juvenile Record Sealing I; students must have satisfactorily completed JRS I to enroll. In this class, students will continue to develop and refine the skills learned in JRS I. Specifically, under the supervision of Professor Dow, students will (i) acquire expertise in the procedures and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code, and (ii) become able to apply the applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. To accomplish these goals, students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible (as well as their parent(s) or guardian(s); notify the appropriate agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow. Students in JRS II will be given more advanced cases and be given more independence when negotiating cases with the district attorneys and speaking at hearings. Finally, students in JRS II may be paired with students from JRS I to assist them on initial cases.

5197 Juvenile Record Sealing II - DOW, KATYA (offered in Fall  2016)
This course is a continuation of Juvenile Record Sealing I; students must have satisfactorily completed JRS I to enroll. In this class, students will continue to develop and refine the skills learned in JRS I. Specifically, under the supervision of Professor Dow, students will (i) acquire expertise in the procedures and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code, and (ii) become able to apply the applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. To accomplish these goals, students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible (as well as their parent(s) or guardian(s); notify the appropriate agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow. Students in JRS II will be given more advanced cases and be given more independence when negotiating cases with the district attorneys and speaking at hearings. Finally, students in JRS II may be paired with students from JRS I to assist them on initial cases.

5397 Law & Order: An Introduction to Jurisprudence - LUNSTROTH (offered in Spring  2014)
Law and Order: An Introduction to Jurisprudence In this class we will explore different ways to think about the law. Although legal theory (legal philosophy, jurisprudence) consists of a long complicated history of often obscure and difficult to understand writings, I am going to approach it with the assumption that the core ideas and intuitions about the law can be developed and discussed in a common sense way that is accessible to anyone in law school. There are no pre-requisites to take this class, except a curiosity about the nature of law and a willingness to give it some careful thought. The grade will be calculated as follows: • Class participation (10/100): you will be expected to do the reading and join in discussions. Some of you naturally talk more than others, but by the end of the class your general approach to understanding the materials should have become apparent from the discussions. • Written assignments (70/100): You will be asked to write three or four short essays (5-8 pages). The final essay will be due the day assigned to the final. It will consist of the prompt: What is law? • Each student will participate in a class presentation/exercise (20/100). By the end of class we should have laid a ground-work that will serve you for the rest of your life with the law. Not only will we grapple with ideas of enduring power, but you will be given a basic set of intellectual tools that can be developed and elaborated on as you grow in experience.

5297 Law & Psychiatry - WINSLADE (offered in Spring  2015)
Law & Psychiatry is a study of current topics in law and psychiatry, including civil commitment, right to treatment, right to refuse treatment, competency to stand trial, competence and cognitive impairment, the insanity defense, and the psychiatrist's role in the sentencing process.

5397 Law and Religion - BROWN (offered in Fall  2016)
The religion clauses of the First Amendment reflects a particular concern for “religion,” but the meaning of religion, its legal treatment, and the limits of religious expression have been fiercely debated. This course explores those debates through the doctrinal, historical, and theoretical dimensions of the First Amendment, paying particular attention to the case law that has developed around these clauses. We will also briefly study the two major judicial philosophical approaches to constitutional interpretation and discuss those interpretations in various cases throughout the semester. Finally, we will review the protections for religion in the workplace provided by Title VII, the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In addition to reviewing the major decisions by the United States Supreme Court on the free exercise and establishment clause, this course provides the historical background for the development of the separation of church and state. Law and religion is designed to teach students to think in sophisticated ways about religious liberty and the interaction of religion and politics and the historical foundation to the religion clauses.

5397 Law and Social Science - KWOK (offered in Spring  2016)
This course focuses on the role of the social sciences within the legal system. We will look at the impact of social science research and evidence in a variety of contexts, including trademark, damages, school segregation, and tort liability. For example, how should courts use survey evidence in determining whether trademarks cause confusion in the marketplace? The social sciences include the disciplines of psychology, economics, sociology, and anthropology. Students should expect to gain sufficient scientific literacy to critically read and apply social science research.

5397 Law and Social Science - KWOK (offered in Spring  2015)
This course focuses on the role of the social sciences within the legal system. We will look at the impact of social science research and evidence in a variety of contexts, including trademark, damages, school segregation, and tort liability. For example, how should courts use survey evidence in determining whether trademarks cause confusion in the marketplace? The social sciences include the disciplines of psychology, economics, sociology, and anthropology. Students should expect to gain sufficient scientific literacy to critically read and apply social science research.

5397 Law and the Commercial Space Industry - CARMINATI (offered in Fall  2014)
This course satisfies the UHLC practice skills requirement. Satellite and commercial space transportation companies manage liability exposure at the international, national, and state level. Their ability to do so hinges on leveraging available government-sponsored indemnification, insurance coverage, and contractual waivers, while taking full advantage of the statutory and common law protections available to limit their liability. Students will be given the opportunity to learn about UN treaties currently governing state-to-state relationships, federal law governing licensing and regulation of commercial space entities, state laws attempting to limit liability for spaceflight entities, and the way in which the US Government has contracted private companies to meet its space transportation needs. Students will also learn about insurance coverage available to, and obtained by, satellite and commercial space transportation companies. This course will also provide an understanding of the satellite and commercial space industries generally, including an overview of the regulation and licensing of telecommunications and commercial space endeavors such as Boeing, Lockheed Space Systems, SpaceX, Virgin Galactic, XCor, and Bigelow, among others. The course will also provide a foundation in the technological aspects of the satellite and commercial space transportation industries to generate a well-rounded understanding of the subject matter. Students will be expected to produce several written assignments throughout the semester. There will be no final exam.

5397 Law Office Management: How to Make Money as a Lawyer - Brown/McIver (offered in Spring  2014)
This course is a guide to understanding how you can be financially successful as a practicing attorney by either working at a law firm or by starting your own practice. Topics covered include: understanding various firm business models, basic law firm accounting and finance, marketing, case selection and valuation, law firm niche selection, how firms cash flow, hiring/firing staff, and ethical issues.

5397 Law Office Management: How to Make Money as a Lawyer - BROWN (offered in Spring  2015)
This course is a guide to understanding how you can be financially successful as a practicing attorney by either working at a law firm or by starting your own practice. Topics covered include: understanding various firm business models, basic law firm accounting and finance, marketing, case selection and valuation, law firm niche selection, how firms cash flow, hiring/firing staff, and ethical issues.

5297 Law, Ethics, & Brain Policy - WINSLADE (offered in Fall  2015)
Covers legal and ethical aspects of brain injury (mental disorders, competency, and criminal responsibility), brain treatments (stem cell, psychosurgery, electroconvulsive therapy), brain imaging (permanently unconscious patients, lie detection), brain death policies, and the emerging field of neuroethics and law.

5297 Legal Aspects of Bioethics - WINSLADE (offered in Spring  2014)
Examines the legal, ethical, and policy aspects of current controversies in bioethics. Topics include the birth, development and growth of bioethics, law and ethics in clinical settings, personal autonomy, privacy, confidentiality and privileged communications, informed consent to medical treatment and research, law and ethics at the end of life, deciding for others (children and incompetent persons), the body as a commodity, organ donation and allocation for transplantation, and patients' rights to refuse treatment.

5297 Legislative Lawyering - KEMP (offered in Spring  2017)
This course is designed to teach and equip students with the skills and tools needed to become legislative lawyers and advocates. Legislative lawyers focus on the intersection of law, policy, and politics and serve as an advocate for their clients in a political setting. Legislative lawyers possess substantive legal knowledge that is coupled with political expertise in order to craft and mold law and policy and advance their clients’ goals. Through this course, students will gain an understanding of the legislative process and learn legislative lawyering skills, including legislative drafting and analysis, negotiation, and oral advocacy. Guest speakers will include current legislative and government affairs attorneys; State and Local elected officials; Department and Agency Directors; and legislative staff members. The Texas Legislature will be in session during the Spring 2017 semester. This will provide students with the opportunity to actively participate in interactive discussions, complete practical assignments designed to provide legislative knowledge, and refine their advocacy skills. There are no prerequisites for this course.

5297 Long Term Care and The Law - STERNTHAL (offered in Spring  2016)
Course Outline: Long Term Care and the Law - This course will focus on legal issues relevant to the operations of long term care providers across the continuum of care, including senior housing, assisted living, nursing facilities, Continuing Care Retirement Communities, and hospice and home health. These legal issues include licensure and accreditation, quality regulation and assurance, admission and discharge policies, reimbursement, and care coordination. We will discuss these issue from a policy context as well as through the statutory, regulatory, and common law framework.

5297 Mental Health Law - TOVINO (offered in Spring  2017)

5297 Money and Morals in the Courtroom and Boardroom - GERGER/LEWIS (offered in Fall  2015)
This class – taught by senior corporate law partner Kevin Lewis of Sidley Austin LLP and white collar criminal partner David Gerger of Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP – explores the complexities in real legal issues you read about in the papers: Can you compete in Asia and Africa without bribing foreign officials when your foreign competition pays bribes? When it comes to executive pay, do CEOs live in Lake Wobegon where every executive is “above average”? Is Fedex responsible for what you put in the box you pay them to ship? And what went wrong at Enron? The course will investigate policy and moral implications that are considered – or ignored – by popular culture and often by the participants themselves. Reading materials and guest speakers will come from real cases and real situations, many of which were handled by the faculty.

5297 Money and Morals in the Courtroom and Boardroom - GERGER/LEWIS (offered in Fall  2016)
This class – taught by senior corporate law partner Kevin Lewis of Sidley Austin LLP and white collar criminal partner David Gerger of Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan, LLP – explores the complexities in real legal issues you read about in the papers: Can you compete in Asia and Africa without bribing foreign officials when your foreign competition pays bribes? When it comes to executive pay, do CEOs live in Lake Wobegon where every executive is “above average”? Is Fedex responsible for what you put in the box you pay them to ship? And what went wrong at Enron? The course will investigate policy and moral implications that are considered – or ignored – by popular culture and often by the participants themselves. Reading materials and guest speakers will come from real cases and real situations, many of which were handled by the faculty.

5297 Money and Morals in the Courtroom and Boardroom - GERGER/LEWIS (offered in Fall  2014)
This class – taught by senior corporate law partner Kevin Lewis of Vinson & Elkins and white collar criminal lawyer David Gerger of Gerger & Clarke – explores the complexities in real legal issues you read about in the papers: Can you compete in Asia and Africa without bribing foreign officials when your foreign competition do pay bribes? What is “insider trading?” When it comes to executive pay, do CEOs live in Lake Wobegon where every executive is “above average”? What’s the difference between “defending against” a government investigation and “obstructing” it? Fracking – what happens when science and politics meet in the board room? What is the philosophy behind sentencing in “white collar” crimes? The course will investigate policy and moral implications that are considered – or ignored – by popular culture and often by the participants themselves. Reading materials and guest speakers will come from real cases and real situations, many of which were handled by the faculty.

5397 National Security Law - BERMAN (offered in Fall  2014)
This course is an introduction to national security law that will cover presidential and congressional national security powers under the Constitution as well as relevant statutes-such as the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act and the USA Patriot Act-regulations, and guidelines. Though the course is not limited to terrorism, terrorism-related issues-particularly post-9/11 counterterrorism policies-will feature heavily. Topics will include the use of military force; domestic and overseas intelligence collection; detention, interrogation, and prosecution (both civilian and military) as national security tools; and access to national security information. We will cover such themes as the allocation of power between Congress and the President on matters of foreign policy and war making, as well as the role of the judiciary in checking the political branches. Grades will be based on an open-book in-class exam.

5397 Natural Resource Damages Liability and Litigation - HESTER (offered in Fall  2016)
Description: The oil-slicked shores of the Gulf Coast and Valdez, the contamined sediments of New Jersey Bay, the million-gallon spills of acid mining wastewater into the Animas River, the radioactive groundwater of the Hanover nuclear weapons plant — some of the largest, most complex and expensive environmental fights in the United States now center on broad regions of contamination that have injured natural resources, ecological systems and endangered species. These environmental injuries have led to the rise of a new type of environmental action: natural resource damage regulations and litigation, which seek to either restore an ecosystem or obtain compensation for its loss. These legal actions often seek to recover billions of dollars in restitution or to compel enormous remediation efforts. This course will explore the fundamental legal issues that drive natural resource damage litigation. By adopting a classroom laboratory approach, we will explore how natural resource damage actions must navigate challenges based on constitutional constraints, standing, political question doctrine, equitable tolling and remedy restrictions, proof of causation, identification of restoration methods, and measurement of damages. Instructors: Tracy Hester and two guest instructors. Prof. Bill Jackson is the name partner of Jackson, Gilmour LLP, and is one of the leading natural resource damage plaintiff’s attorneys in the United States. Prof. Tom Campbell, the managing partner of Pillsbury LLP’s Houston office, is the former general counsel of the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Adminstration and a leading defense counsel on large natural resource damage and Superfund cost recovery claims.

5297 Negotiation and Creative Problem Solving - BOLON / KELLY (offered in SummerMini  2016)
"Negotiation tactics & strategies, including creating value, claiming value, and coalition building. Will feature exercises and guest speakers and will link negotiation skills to legal practice. Mandatory attendance and participation, requiring robust pre-class preparation each week."

5397 Negotiation and Creative Problem Solving - BOLON / KELLY (offered in Spring  2015)
"Negotiation tactics & strategies, including creating value, claiming value, and coalition building. Will feature exercises and guest speakers and will link negotiation skills to legal practice. Mandatory attendance and participation, requiring robust pre-class preparation each week."

5397 Negotiation and Creative Problem Solving - BOLON / KELLY (offered in Spring  2014)
"Negotiation tactics & strategies, including creating value, claiming value, and coalition building. Will feature exercises and guest speakers and will link negotiation skills to legal practice. Mandatory attendance and participation, requiring robust pre-class preparation each week."

5297 Offshore Leasing - MOORE (offered in Spring  2014)
The course will cover the Deepwater JOA, Participation Agreements, appropriate portions of 30 CFR, the impact of the OHA Directors decision in the Julia case on Deepwater GoM Suspensions of Operation, the cycle time from lease acquisition to first oil or gas, mid-stream issues (pipelines to shore and PHA’s), OCS Lease Sales, internal approval processes of Lessees and other topics.

5297 Offshore Leasing - MOORE (offered in Spring  2015)
The course will cover the Deepwater JOA, Participation Agreements, appropriate portions of 30 CFR, the impact of the OHA Directors decision in the Julia case on Deepwater GoM Suspensions of Operation, the cycle time from lease acquisition to first oil or gas, mid-stream issues (pipelines to shore and PHA’s), OCS Lease Sales, internal approval processes of Lessees and other topics.

5397 Oil & Gas Pipeline Regulation - LAKE (offered in Spring  2015)
'Oily' shale gas plays in the United States have spotlighted the need for additional domestic pipeline infrastructure that may include a combination of natural gas pipelines and oil/condensate pipelines. This course will compare and contrast the principal substantive laws and rules in the United States that govern the economic regulation of oil pipelines and natural gas pipelines, with emphasis on federal regulation under the Interstate Commerce Act and the Natural Gas Act. In addition, the course will focus on the differing historical antecedents, and economic and regulatory policies , which are the drivers of economic regulation of domestic oil and gas pipelines under these different regulatory regimes. This course will be taught using statutes, court cases, and agency decisions assembled by Professor Lake; these course reading materials will be made available through the Associate Dean's office prior to the first day of class.

5397 Oil & Gas Pipeline Regulation - LAKE (offered in Spring  2014)
'Oily' shale gas plays in the United States have spotlighted the need for additional domestic pipeline infrastructure that may include a combination of natural gas pipelines and oil/condensate pipelines. This course will compare and contrast the principal substantive laws and rules in the United States that govern the economic regulation of oil pipelines and natural gas pipelines, with emphasis on federal regulation under the Interstate Commerce Act and the Natural Gas Act. In addition, the course will focus on the differing historical antecedents, and economic and regulatory policies , which are the drivers of economic regulation of domestic oil and gas pipelines under these different regulatory regimes. This course will be taught using statutes, court cases, and agency decisions assembled by Professor Lake; these course reading materials will be made available through the UH Copy Center prior to the first day of class. THE FIRST DAY OF CLASS FOR THIS COURSE IS THURSDAY, JANUARY 16.

5297 Origins of the Federal Constitution - ESKRIDGE/PETERSON (offered in Fall  2014)
Origins of the Federal Constitution presents an intensive introduction to the historical sources of the Constitution. By reference to original source documents, the class considers the common law and other influences on early American government and justice, such as Locke, Montesquieu, and Blackstone’s Commentaries; the colonial experience leading to and immediately following the American Revolution; documents and debate directly relevant to formation of individual constitutional provisions and amendments; and the initial experience and understanding of the Constitution, through to Story’s Commentaries, in addition to later amendments. The class will also consider the influence and use of this material on modern interpretation of the Constitution.

5297 Origins of the Federal Constitution - ESKRIDGE/PETERSON (offered in Spring  2015)
Origins of the Federal Constitution presents an intensive introduction to the historical sources of the Constitution. By reference to original source documents, the class considers the common law and other influences on early American government and justice, such as Locke, Montesquieu, and Blackstone’s Commentaries; the colonial experience leading to and immediately following the American Revolution; documents and debate directly relevant to formation of individual constitutional provisions and amendments; and the initial experience and understanding of the Constitution, through to Story’s Commentaries, in addition to later amendments. The class will also consider the influence and use of this material on modern interpretation of the Constitution.

5397 Practice of Environmental Law - HESTER (offered in Spring  2014)
This course is, more accurately, an Environmental Law Practicum. It will overview key areas of practice within environmental law such as regulatory counseling and permitting, civil enforcement, criminal liability, private litigation over environmental contamination, policy advocacy, and environmental aspects of commercial transactions. Each lecture topic will be paired with a separate presentation by a guest speaker who practices in that area, and who will provide examples of live projects and cases for class review. These speakers may include the Harris County Attorney (civil enforcement), the Galveston Bay Foundation (permitting), the Harris County District Attorney (criminal), the Audubon Society (policy advocacy) and others.

5397 Practice-based Legal Writing - TABOR (offered in Spring  2014)
Students will have varied opportunities to write and receive feedback on their writing in transactional and litigation contexts. Writing assignments may include short articles, letters (e.g., demand, opposing counsel, client, court), pleadings, motions, policies/procedures (e.g., promotion, protection of individual rights, discipline), and contracts or contract excerpts. Each student will complete three to five practical writing assignments, with total production of at least twenty-one pages, based on an average of 250-300 words per double-spaced page. Some assignments may require research. Each assignment will require the student to submit a first draft, which will be returned with written feedback, a second draft, for which feedback may be written or oral, and a final version that is rewritten to incorporate the second-draft feedback. In addition to any conference scheduled for second-draft feedback, each student will be offered opportunities to meet in conference with the professor for individualized assessment of the student’s writing. No text is required.

5297 Procedure of Patent Litigation - DHANANI/ALFARO (offered in Fall  2014)
The Course will focus on how to litigate a patent infringement case in Federal District Court and the relationship of the district courts and the Federal Circuit in patent litigation. In particular, the course will examine a hypothetical patent case from the pleadings, through the Markman hearing, and to trial. The course focuses on the hands-on issues that patent litigators face in their day to day trial preparation. The goal is to provide the students with an overall process for how a patent case is conducted all the way through trial.

6397 Promoting Sustainability I: Legal Frameworks and Value - WOLDU/WEAVER (offered in SummerMini  2016)
This is a non-law course; all limits and approvals for non-law courses apply. For the Summer Mini Session 2016, however, this course will count towards the 15 credits of energy, environment, and natural resources courses required for the EENR LLM.

6397 Promoting Sustainability II: Workforce and Local Community - CHRISTIANSEN / SPITZMUELLER (offered in Summer II  2016)
This is a non-law course; all limits and approvals for non-law courses apply.

5397 Public Health Law - WINNIKE (offered in Fall  2015)
This course provides an in-depth examination of public health law principles and challenges. Students will explore constitutional issues related to public health and develop an understanding of the state’s public health powers and duties as they are balanced against an individual's legally protected rights. The course will explore a range of public health law issues, including infectious disease control measures, immunization policy, emergency preparedness and bioterrorism, government regulation of unhealthy products, the state’s role in promoting healthy behaviors, and public health surveillance and privacy issues.

5397 Real Estate Transactions - ZALE (offered in Fall  2014)
This course applies substantive concepts from the first-year property course to a wide range of common real estate transactions and related matters. The primary focus will be residential transaction, but issues relating to commercial transactions will also be considered. Matters to be covered include broker listing agreements, purchase and sales contracts, conveyancing documents, recording acts, title and survey, leases, mortgages and deed of trusts, foreclosures, and other financing issues. The course will be taught through a combination of lecture, drafting exercises, and student discussion of cases and other assigned material. The objective of the course is give students a basic foundation for understanding real estate practice and the tools to identify and address legal issues associated with the conveyancing and financing of real property.

5397 Real Estate Transactions, Practical Drafting - SMITH, FRANK (offered in Spring  2015)
This is a “nuts & bolts” practical course that will consider the basic building blocks of real estate transactions, a survey of a wide range of various common real esate transaction, and related matters. Many of the topics to be covered apply both to commercial and consumer real estate transactions. Some consumer transactions will be considered, but the primary focus will be on commercial transactions. Matters to be covered will include conveyancing documents, recordation statutes, purchase and sale agreements, chain of title, selected oil, gas and mineral issues as they may impact on real estate title and development, title insurance, basic methods of real estate finance, promissory notes, deeds of trust, troubled loan workout issues, foreclosure, leases, ethics and lawyers liability issues in real estate transactions. Course assignments will include the drafting of various documents, including deeds, promissory notes, sales contracts, and selected provisions of deeds of trust, foreclosure documents, and leases.

5397 Real Estate Transactions, Practical Drafting - LONG (offered in Spring  2015)
This is a “nuts & bolts” practical course that will consider the basic building blocks of real estate transactions, a survey of a wide range of various common real esate transaction, and related matters. Many of the topics to be covered apply both to commercial and consumer real estate transactions. Some consumer transactions will be considered, but the primary focus will be on commercial transactions. Matters to be covered will include conveyancing documents, recordation statutes, purchase and sale agreements, chain of title, selected oil, gas and mineral issues as they may impact on real estate title and development, title insurance, basic methods of real estate finance, promissory notes, deeds of trust, troubled loan workout issues, foreclosure, leases, ethics and lawyers liability issues in real estate transactions. Course assignments will include the drafting of various documents, including deeds, promissory notes, sales contracts, and selected provisions of deeds of trust, foreclosure documents, and leases.

5397 Real Estate Transactions, Practical Drafting - LONG (offered in Spring  2017)
This is a “nuts & bolts” practical course that will consider the basic building blocks of real estate transactions, a survey of a wide range of various common real esate transaction, and related matters. Many of the topics to be covered apply both to commercial and consumer real estate transactions. Some consumer transactions will be considered, but the primary focus will be on commercial transactions. Matters to be covered will include conveyancing documents, recordation statutes, purchase and sale agreements, chain of title, selected oil, gas and mineral issues as they may impact on real estate title and development, title insurance, basic methods of real estate finance, promissory notes, deeds of trust, troubled loan workout issues, foreclosure, leases, ethics and lawyers liability issues in real estate transactions. Course assignments will include the drafting of various documents, including deeds, promissory notes, sales contracts, and selected provisions of deeds of trust, foreclosure documents, and leases.

5397 Real Estate Transactions, Practical Drafting - LONG (offered in Spring  2016)
This is a “nuts & bolts” practical course that will consider the basic building blocks of real estate transactions, a survey of a wide range of various common real esate transaction, and related matters. Many of the topics to be covered apply both to commercial and consumer real estate transactions. Some consumer transactions will be considered, but the primary focus will be on commercial transactions. Matters to be covered will include conveyancing documents, recordation statutes, purchase and sale agreements, chain of title, selected oil, gas and mineral issues as they may impact on real estate title and development, title insurance, basic methods of real estate finance, promissory notes, deeds of trust, troubled loan workout issues, foreclosure, leases, ethics and lawyers liability issues in real estate transactions. Course assignments will include the drafting of various documents, including deeds, promissory notes, sales contracts, and selected provisions of deeds of trust, foreclosure documents, and leases.

7A97 Regulatory Environment and Risks in Energy - FLATT, VICTOR (offered in Spring  2016)
Course Number is: FINA 7A59 Course is 1.5 credit hour. Course Description: Energy extraction and utilization is heavily regulated, at both the federal and state levels. Some times (as in “fracturing”) there have been attempts by local government to interact with energy extraction or utilization as well. With renewed attention on climate change, other significant air pollution, and water resources, this regulation has been increasing, and will continue to increase. Therefore, anyone in either the upstream or downstream business of energy or energy law needs to be aware of the impacts of such regulation and economic risks of these current regulations as well as the possibility of future regulation, in order to make effective business allocation decisions. This class explores the known and likely future regulatory risks, especially environmentally related regulations, and examines the likely impacts of such regulation on the energy business. Readings are mostly posted on blackboard and you are responsible for reading and bringing copy to class for discussion; Additionally, we will discuss your paper topics during each of the last 4 classes. Grade is based on class participation and one writing project, due one week after the final class. The writing project is a minimum 10 page case study or memorandum concerning the economic impact posed by a specific environmental or health based law (or proposed law) or legal regulatory risk (for the law students) to a sector of the energy business. Topics will be selected in one on one meetings with the professor between Jan. 27 and Feb. 5. Law students and MBA students will be graded separately and not included in any grade curve (where applicable).

5297 Representing Energy Borrowers - DOLE/DOLE/KEYES (offered in Spring  2016)
Course Description and Prerequisite This two-hour course introduces students to the structure and customary documentation of bank credit facilities secured by personal property collateral through the documentation of a hypothetical commercial loan scenario. Both documents from actual transactions and model forms will be utilized. Techniques for maximizing Article 9 rights and avoiding fraudulent transfers will be emphasized. The Texas special loan agreement statute of frauds and Texas usury law will be discussed. Students will participate in a maximum of four drafting exercises involving such topics as reconciling a draft Credit Agreement and a Term Sheet, drafting a Security Agreement and a Financing Statement implementing a Credit Agreement, drafting a Limited Guaranty implementing a Credit Agreement, and redrafting a Legal Opinion with respect to the enforceability of the hypothetical transaction documents and the perfection of the security interest created by the hypothetical transaction Security Agreement and Financing Statement. SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF THIS TWO-HOUR COURSE WILL SATISFY IN FULL THE LAW CENTER SKILLS COURSE REQUIREMENT.

5297 Representing Energy Borrowers - DOLE/DOLE/KEYES (offered in Spring  2017)
Course Description and Prerequisite This two-hour course introduces students to the structure and customary documentation of bank credit facilities secured by personal property collateral through the documentation of a hypothetical commercial loan scenario. Both documents from actual transactions and model forms will be utilized. Techniques for maximizing Article 9 rights and avoiding fraudulent transfers will be emphasized. The Texas special loan agreement statute of frauds and Texas usury law will be discussed. Students will participate in a maximum of four drafting exercises involving such topics as reconciling a draft Credit Agreement and a Term Sheet, drafting a Security Agreement and a Financing Statement implementing a Credit Agreement, drafting a Limited Guaranty implementing a Credit Agreement, and redrafting a Legal Opinion with respect to the enforceability of the hypothetical transaction documents and the perfection of the security interest created by the hypothetical transaction Security Agreement and Financing Statement. SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF THIS TWO-HOUR COURSE WILL SATISFY IN FULL THE LAW CENTER SKILLS COURSE REQUIREMENT.

7397 SEM: Health Regulatory Process - MANTEL (offered in Spring  2014)
This course explores how legal and policy considerations, intra-governmental relationships, and political dynamics influence health regulatory policies. Guest speakers will include current and former Department of Health and Human Services officials and health care advocates.

7397 SEM: Information Privacy Law - CASAREZ (offered in Spring  2014)
"Information privacy" refers to each individual's right to control personal information about him/herself, and it is one of the fastest growing, and most multi-faceted, areas of the law. Solo practitioners representing private citizens in civil and criminal matters, as well as big-firm and in-house lawyers working for domestic and international corporations, the government, the press and/or the financial and health care industries, all confront privacy issues with increasing frequency. Information privacy law transcends traditional legal categories to involve multiple areas of the law, including torts, contracts, constitutional law, criminal procedure, administrative law and statutory interpretation. Privacy disputes are controversial (and often headline-generating) because they almost always involve significant competing policy interests. Consider the National Security Agency's warrantless electronic surveillance program: is it a dangerous violation of our civil liberties, or a benign and necessary tool to fight terrorism? The purpose of this seminar is to provide students with an overview of important areas of privacy law, and to allow students to focus in-depth on a subject of particular relevance to them. Topics covered will include privacy and the media, privacy and law enforcement, surveillance law and national security, health and genetic privacy, associational privacy and anonymity, privacy of commercial data, among others. Each student will be responsible for participating in weekly class discussions, a final class presentation, and completing a seminar paper.

7397 SEM: Topics in Employment Law - MOOHR (offered in Spring  2014)
The goal of this seminar is to develop knowledge of employment law through reading, discussion, and writing a paper on a topic of your choice. We will review classic employment law and discrimination cases, analyze unresolved and emerging issues and look at circuit cases the Supreme Court is hearing this term. Generally, the course is divided into three parts: the first is devoted to reviewing historically important employment law and discrimination cases, the second to emerging issues and current cases, the third to writing and editing your paper. You will write a paper that satisfies the Law Center writing requirement, and are required to submit other assignments, including a first draft of the paper. Your final seminar grade is based on the paper, a good faith effort to complete the course requirements, and professional conduct throughout the semester.

7397 Seminar in Energy Efficiency - Radhakrishnan, Suryanarayanan (offered in Spring  2015)
Course name is: GENB 7397- Section number: 25633.This course is offered by Bauer College of Business. Interested students please contact Mr. Derrick Gabriel at 713-743-2189. This course does not satisfy senior level writing requirements.

5297 Shale Gas & LNG - SAKMAR (offered in Spring  2015)
This course explores the myriad of legal, policy and environmental issues pertaining to global natural gas markets with a particular focus on global shale gas development and the development of LNG import and export projects around the world, including recent developments in US LNG export projects. The first half of the semester will explore the growing role that natural gas will play around the world in the context of global shale gas development. By most accounts, shale gas development in the United States has been a “game changer” that could be replicated around the world so long as the right regulatory and environmental frameworks are put in place. This course will explore the existing regulatory and environmental frameworks for shale gas, especially those in the United States, as well as frameworks being developed around the world with the objective of exploring the substantive law of shale gas development as well as developing the analytical and practical skills necessary to the practice of law. The second half of the semester will explore the growing role that LNG is expected to play as the “glue” linking global gas markets. The course will explore the opportunities and challenges for various LNG import and export projects around the world in the current contextual reality wherein energy law and policy are increasingly intersecting with environmental law and geopolitics. READING LIST

5297 Shale Gas & LNG - SAKMAR (offered in Spring  2016)
This course explores the myriad of legal, policy and environmental issues pertaining to global natural gas markets with a particular focus on global shale gas development and the development of LNG import and export projects around the world, including recent developments in US LNG export projects. This semester will be particularly interesting, as we will discuss the role of natural gas and LNG in the current low-oil price environment. The first half of the semester will explore the growing role that natural gas will play around the world in the context of global shale gas development. By most accounts, shale gas development in the United States has been a “game changer” that could be replicated around the world so long as the right regulatory and environmental frameworks are put in place. This course will explore the existing regulatory and environmental frameworks for shale gas, especially those in the United States, as well as frameworks being developed around the world with the objective of exploring the substantive law of shale gas development as well as developing the analytical and practical skills necessary to the practice of law. The second half of the semester will explore the growing role that LNG is expected to play as the “glue” linking global gas markets. The course will explore the opportunities and challenges for various LNG import and export projects around the world in the current contextual reality wherein energy law and policy are increasingly intersecting with environmental law and geopolitics. Particular focus will be on recent policy and regulatory actions taken with respect to US LNG exports.

5297 Spanish for Lawyers I - ROMERO (offered in Spring  2016)
An introductory level Spanish course designed for students with little or no previous Spanish language knowledge. Speaking, listening, reading, writing, and vocabulary development skills will be practiced within the context of legal professions, especially criminal, family, and immigration law.

5297 Spanish for Lawyers I - ROMERO (offered in Spring  2017)
Quota=20. An introductory level Spanish course designed for students with little or no previous Spanish language knowledge. Speaking, listening, reading, writing, and vocabulary development skills will be practiced within the context of legal professions, especially criminal, family, and immigration law.

5297 Special Education Law - RYNDERS (offered in Fall  2015)
Course addresses the state and federal laws and regulations that govern the education of students with disabilities. Course will cover identification, evaluation, individualized education programs, placement, related services, assistive technology, discipline, enforcement, and remedies. This course will use a combination of lectures, class discussions, in-class exercises, and case studies.

5297 Special Education Law - RYNDERS (offered in Fall  2016)
Course addresses the state and federal laws and regulations that govern the education of students with disabilities. Course will cover identification, evaluation, individualized education programs, placement, related services, assistive technology, discipline, enforcement, and remedies. This course will use a combination of lectures, class discussions, in-class exercises, and case studies.

5297 Sports Law - MILLER (offered in Fall  2015)
The course examines a wide range of amateur and professional sports topics, including the athlete/agent relationship, contracts, commissioner powers and league governance, gender discrimination and Title IX, stadium and spectator liabilities, anti-trust, labor and employment issues, intellectual property and licensing, constitutional law, and ethics. Skills focus on contract development, negotiation, dispute resolution and writing.

5397 State & Local Gov't Law - ZALE (offered in Spring  2015)
While much of law school focuses on federal law, state and local law affects people more directly and concretely. States and local governments have substantial law-making and regulatory authority in areas as diverse as education policy, civil rights, tax law, land use and environmental issues. In addition, states and local governments are responsible for the financing and provision of most public services, and are the locus of much political participation by voters. This course examines both the law governing the powers of states and local governments and the actual content of state and local laws and policy. The course will also consider the relationships among various levels of government, including federal-state relations, state-local relations and intra-local relations.

5497 Street Law - MARRUS (offered in Spring  2016)
Law students will teach high school age students about the law including constitutional law, family law, criminal law, housing law, and other areas. Street Law empowers young people to be active, engaged citizens by equipping them with the knowledge and skills they need to successfully participate in their communities. Law students will gain a greater knowledge of substantive law and how to explain the law to lay people, develop their ability for oral presentations both in formal settings and thinking on their feet, improve legal research skills, and gain an understanding of the legal system in the context of those persons directly affected by it. Students will participate in a weekly seminar class that will provide the resources and tools necessary for teaching the law to high school students and will commit to teach approximately 4 hours a week in a high school or a community organization.

5497 Street Law - MARRUS/NEELY (offered in Spring  2017)
Law students will teach high school age students about the law including constitutional law, family law, criminal law, housing law, and other areas. Street Law empowers young people to be active, engaged citizens by equipping them with the knowledge and skills they need to successfully participate in their communities. Law students will gain a greater knowledge of substantive law and how to explain the law to lay people, develop their ability for oral presentations both in formal settings and thinking on their feet, improve legal research skills, and gain an understanding of the legal system in the context of those persons directly affected by it. Students will participate in a weekly seminar class that will provide the resources and tools necessary for teaching the law to high school students and will commit to teach approximately 4 hours a week in a high school or a community organization.

5397 Tax Policy - BUCKLES (offered in Spring  2017)
Designed (i) to introduce students to recurring themes of tax policy; and (ii) to develop students’ ability to analyze and discuss existing and proposed laws in terms of the tax policies that such laws do and do not serve.

5397 Tax Policy - BUCKLES (offered in Spring  2016)
Designed (i) to introduce students to recurring themes of tax policy; and (ii) to develop students’ ability to analyze and discuss existing and proposed laws in terms of the tax policies that such laws do and do not serve.

5297 Tax Policy - HOOSE (offered in Spring  2015)
This seminar is designed (i) to introduce students to recurring themes of tax policy; and (ii) to develop students' ability to analyze and discuss the tax policy implications of existing and proposed laws.

5297 Taxation of Intellectual Property - Hoose (offered in Spring  2014)
This course is designed to give a comprehensive understanding of U.S. federal and state tax rules applicable to the development, acquisition, transfer, and exploitation of intellectual property. The course will also cover the tax consequences of litigation involving intellectual property. Finally, the course will undertake an in-depth analysis of the role played by intellectual property in the international and state tax planning structures (often referred to as “base erosion and profit shifting” structures, or BEPS for short) commonly used by U.S. and foreign based multinational corporations, primarily in the technology sector.

5297 Terrorism and the Law - MARTINEZ/HAMDANI (offered in Summer I  2016)
This course will focus on the U.S. Government’s authority and limitations to prevent and prosecute acts of terrorism in the homeland and elsewhere. Special attention will be given to national security policies and laws that affect the individual privacy rights of all citizens. Topics will include the designation of enemy combatants, military tribunals, and detention of suspects at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Attention will also be given to the use of secret wiretaps used by the FBI and other federal stakeholders to monitor terrorist activity. Particular attention will be given to limits the courts place on the President and Congress as they attempt to protect the nation from attacks by al Qaeda, ISIS and other foreign terrorist organizations. Guest speakers from the FBI, CIA and DOD will appear in class to discuss the role their agencies play in the war on terror. *The views expressed by the professors do not necessarily reflect the views of their respective employer – The United States Department of Justice.

5297 Texas Consumer Law - ALDERMAN (offered in Spring  2016)
This course will be a condensed version of the three-hour Texas Consumer Law course, taught in the spring semester. Emphasis will be placed on those areas of law that are examined on the Texas Bar. Numerous old bar questions will be reviewed. Material that will not be covered includes products liability, warranty, and federal debt collection.

5297 Texas Consumer Law - ALDERMAN (offered in Spring  2017)
This course will be a condensed version of the three-hour Texas Consumer Law course, taught in the spring semester. Emphasis will be placed on those areas of law that are examined on the Texas Bar. Numerous old bar questions will be reviewed. Material that will not be covered includes products liability, warranty, and federal debt collection.

5397 Texas Criminal Appellate Procedure - WICOFF (offered in Fall  2016)
This upper-level class will focus on state criminal appellate procedure, with emphasis placed on the Texas Rules of Appellate Procedure and, where applicable to state appellate practice, the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure. The general approach of this course will be twofold: 1) to examine case law interpretation of the procedural rules that govern post-judgment criminal procedure in Texas, from motions for new trial through state post-conviction writs of habeas corpus; and 2) to discuss the most common substantive issues which arise in appellate proceedings in state courts, including claims of ineffective assistance of trial counsel, evidence sufficiency law, appellate review of jury charge error, Brady violations and actual innocence claims. Throughout this course, practical and strategic aspects of appellate practice will regularly be discussed. In addition to reading assigned cases, students will be required to read an appellate transcript of an appeal that has been handled by the Harris County Public Defender’s Office appellate division, thereby seeing how the subject matter of the course applies, step-by-step, to an actual appeal. The students will also be invited to watch the oral argument that is held in the case. The aim is to provide students with an appropriate mix of theory and practice. So, for example, you will not only learn the rules regarding appeals, but will be provided with an appellate record that illustrates much of what you learn. Additionally, you will not only have that record as an illustration of what is being discussed in class, but you will be taught how to read that record if you were charged with handling the appeal.

5397 Texas Criminal Appellate Procedure - WICOFF (offered in Fall  2014)
This upper-level class will focus on state criminal appellate procedure, with emphasis placed on the Texas Rules of Appellate Procedure and, where applicable to state appellate practice, the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure. The general approach of this course will be twofold: 1) to examine case law interpretation of the procedural rules that govern post-judgment criminal procedure in Texas, from motions for new trial through state post-conviction writs of habeas corpus; and 2) to discuss the most common substantive issues which arise in appellate proceedings in state courts, including claims of ineffective assistance of trial counsel, evidence sufficiency law, appellate review of jury charge error, Brady violations and actual innocence claims. Throughout this course, practical and strategic aspects of appellate practice will regularly be discussed. In addition to reading assigned cases, students will be required to read an appellate transcript of an appeal that has been handled by the Harris County Public Defender’s Office appellate division, thereby seeing how the subject matter of the course applies, step-by-step, to an actual appeal. The students will also be invited to watch the oral argument that is held in the case. The aim is to provide students with an appropriate mix of theory and practice. So, for example, you will not only learn the rules regarding appeals, but will be provided with an appellate record that illustrates much of what you learn. Additionally, you will not only have that record as an illustration of what is being discussed in class, but you will be taught how to read that record if you were charged with handling the appeal.

5297 Texas Legislative Advocacy - SMITH,E (offered in Fall  2015)
Course Outline

5297 The Current Crisis in the Middle East: Saudi Arabia vs Iran - FOTEH (offered in SummerMini  2016)
This course will provide insight into substantive areas of history, religion, politics (regional and worldwide), longstanding relationships, legal systems, human rights and women’s rights framed by current events in the most volatile and important region in the world. Since the beginning of civilization, the Middle East has been the hotbed of ongoing conflict. It is to the point where one conflict is almost indistinguishable from another. The current provocation between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the Islamic Republic of Iran could potentially alter the map of the Middle East and have a massive irrevocable impact on the entire world. This course will begin by examining the issues leading up to the current hostility and continue through the potential outcomes and its potential impact on the world. This course will be a timely and interesting way to begin to understand the issues involved in this region and how it can impact Houston and the world.

9397 The Future of Natural Gas - Ramana Krishnamoorti & Joe Pratt (offered in Spring  2015)
Course name is: GENB 7397 / ENRG 4397. Interested students please contact Mr. Derrick Gabriel at 713-743-2189.

5397 The Law and Theology - BUCKLES (offered in Fall  2016)
The goals of this course are (i) to introduce students to selected topics in the study of theology that conceptually parallel specific subjects in law and legal philosophy; (ii) to expand students’ understanding of how theological thought can inform legal inquiry, and how legal thought can inform theological inquiry; and (iii) to increase students’ awareness and enhance students’ comprehension of the variety of historical and contemporary approaches to resolving problems that have arisen in theological and legal thought.

5397 The Law and Theology - BUCKLES (offered in Fall  2015)

5397 The Subprime Mortgage Crisis - FAGUNDES (offered in Spring  2016)
The subprime mortgage crisis of 2008 wreaked havoc on the U.S. and international economy, and its effects continue to be felt. This course examines the subprime mortgage crisis as a legal, social, economic, and cultural phenomenon. It will begin by examining the crisis itself, beginning with its various causal precursors and then examining in detail how the mortgage meltdown and its allied effects unfolded. It will then examine the series of legislative and doctrinal responses that Congress and courts implemented in response to the crisis. Throughout, the course will consider blackletter principles of the many areas of law implicated by the crisis, including mortgage formation, foreclosure procedures, fraud, corporate governance, securities regulation, and fiduciary duties. Finally, the course will consider the ongoing legacy of the subprime mortgage crisis in terms of its social and economic impact as well as broader themes including greed, happiness, capitalism, regulation, cognitive biases, and the pursuit of the elusive American dream.

5397 The U.S. Health System: An Introduction to Managed Care, Transactions, and Policy - MANTEL (offered in Spring  2016)
This course provides students with an understanding of how the health care system is currently organized, financed, and regulated, and explores what the health care system of tomorrow may look like. Students are introduced to the major laws and regulations that regulate health care finance and transactions, including the Affordable Care Act (aka “Obamacare"). The first part of the course focuses on health insurance and looks at federal and state regulation of private health insurance, the public insurance programs Medicare and Medicaid, and the new health care exchanges. We then study the business of health care and the laws that impact health care business transactions, including the tax laws governing tax-exempt organizations, the antitrust laws, and the fraud and abuse laws.

5397 The U.S. Health System: An Introduction to Managed Care, Transactions, and Policy - MANTEL (offered in Fall  2016)
This course provides students with an understanding of how the health care system is currently organized, financed, and regulated, and explores what the health care system of tomorrow may look like. Students are introduced to the major laws and regulations that regulate health care finance and transactions, including the Affordable Care Act (aka “Obamacare"). The first part of the course focuses on health insurance and looks at federal and state regulation of private health insurance, the public insurance programs Medicare and Medicaid, and the new health care exchanges. We then study the business of health care and the laws that impact health care business transactions, including the tax laws governing tax-exempt organizations, the antitrust laws, and the fraud and abuse laws.

5397 The U.S. Health System: An Introduction to Managed Care, Transactions, and Policy - MANTEL (offered in Spring  2015)
This course provides students with an understanding of how the health care system is currently organized, financed, and regulated, and explores what the health care system of tomorrow may look like. Students are introduced to the major laws and regulations that regulate health care finance and transactions, including the Affordable Care Act (aka “Obamacare"). The first part of the course focuses on health insurance and looks at federal and state regulation of private health insurance, the public insurance programs Medicare and Medicaid, and the new health care exchanges. We then study the business of health care and the laws that impact health care business transactions, including the tax laws governing tax-exempt organizations, the antitrust laws, and the fraud and abuse laws. The course concludes with a study of the federal privacy law, known as HIPAA.

5297 The Wire - BRALEY (offered in Spring  2014)
This course explores advanced criminal procedure concepts and policy issues raised by David Simon's critically acclaimed HBO series, “The Wire.” Among the topics explored, will be the use of electronic surveillance in law enforcement and the policy and constitutional implications of its use with and without judicial approval, confessions, profiling, charging and disposition of criminal cases, honesty and accountability of law enforcement, the war on drugs, and the distribution of resources in the criminal justice system. In addition to class participation, grades will be determined based on a paper that students will be responsible for drafting and submitting at the end of the semester. Before enrolling in this course, please be advised that “The Wire” contains a considerable amount of violence and offensive language, and this course will require you to watch the first two seasons of the show in advance of the first class.

5397 The Wire - FRELS/BRALEY (offered in Spring  2015)
This course explores advanced criminal procedure concepts and policy issues raised by David Simon's critically acclaimed HBO series, “The Wire.” Among the topics explored, will be the use of electronic surveillance in law enforcement and the policy and constitutional implications of its use with and without judicial approval, confessions, profiling, charging and disposition of criminal cases, honesty and accountability of law enforcement, the war on drugs, and the distribution of resources in the criminal justice system. In addition to class participation, grades will be determined based on a paper that students will be responsible for drafting and submitting at the end of the semester. Before enrolling in this course, please be advised that “The Wire” contains a considerable amount of violence and offensive language, and this course will require you to watch the first two seasons of the show in advance of the first class.

5297 The Wire - BRALEY (offered in Summer I  2016)
This course explores advanced criminal procedure concepts and policy issues raised by David Simon's critically acclaimed HBO series, “The Wire.” Among the topics explored, will be the use of electronic surveillance in law enforcement and the policy and constitutional implications of its use with and without judicial approval, confessions, profiling, charging and disposition of criminal cases, honesty and accountability of law enforcement, the war on drugs, and the distribution of resources in the criminal justice system. In addition to class participation, grades will be determined based on a paper that students will be responsible for drafting and submitting at the end of the semester. Before enrolling in this course, please be advised that “The Wire” contains a considerable amount of violence and offensive language, and this course will require you to watch the first two seasons of the show in advance of the first class.

5397 Toxic Torts - SANDERS (offered in Spring  2017)
This course strives to give students an overview of the law of environmental and toxic torts. It includes cases in which there is a personal injury or property damage due to exposure to toxic substances, including drugs. It combines a historic overview of the field with coverage of the current issues confronting the courts and Congress. The legal system’s response to these substances is both proactive and retroactive. Statutes such as the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) seek to prevent injury by assessing a drug’s safety before permitting it to be marketed and by regulating the handling of hazardous waste. Common law torts suits sounding in negligence, products liability, nuisance, trespass, and strict liability for abnormally dangerous activities – provide potential redress for injuries caused by toxic substances and drugs and as do statutes such as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), which seeks to ensure that sites that have been contaminated are cleaned up to safe standards. This course explores both responses within the context of private tort law and statutes.

5397 Toxic Torts - SANDERS (offered in Fall  2014)
This course strives to give students an overview of the law of environmental and toxic torts. It includes cases in which there is a personal injury or property damage due to exposure to toxic substances, including drugs. It combines a historic overview of the field with coverage of the current issues confronting the courts and Congress. The legal system’s response to these substances is both proactive and retroactive. Statutes such as the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDCA) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) seek to prevent injury by assessing a drug’s safety before permitting it to be marketed and by regulating the handling of hazardous waste. Common law torts suits sounding in negligence, products liability, nuisance, trespass, and strict liability for abnormally dangerous activities – provide potential redress for injuries caused by toxic substances and drugs and as do statutes such as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), which seeks to ensure that sites that have been contaminated are cleaned up to safe standards. This course explores both responses within the context of private tort law and statutes.

5297 Trademark & Unfair Competition - KRIEGER (offered in Spring  2015)
The course focusses on trademarks and related unfair competition principles from both historical and modern (i.e., internet) settings. The course examines the various types of words, slogans, product packaging and shapes, and other indicia that can be used as trademarks; strategies and requirements for developing, registering, and enforcing trademark rights and defending against such actions; and case studies from an adversarial perspective of various types of trademark infringement and dilution cases and administrative actions challenging trademark registrations.

5297 Trademark Prosecution - HUNT (offered in SummerMini  2016)
This two-hour course provides hands-on training and instruction on the procedure of Trademark prosecution, from pre-application searching and client admonishment through the filing of renewal documents ten years after registration. Particular attention will be paid to the bases for application-filings and common refusals. Class discussion will focus on the law, precedent, and the USPTO’s Trademark Manual of Examining Procedure. The course will also familiarize students with the electronic systems used by the trademark bar for searching databases of current registrations and pending applications, filing electronic applications, and responding to official correspondence issued by the USPTO. Upon completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and understanding required to prosecute a trademark registration for others when licensed to practice law.

5497 Transactional Clinic I - KAFAH BACHARI (offered in Spring  2014)
Students advise small businesses and people trying to start small businesses about business structure, contracts, possible tax issues, commercial law matters and similar problems. Many of the small businesses raise sophisticated legal problems, while some are routine. Students work under a professor who is a member of the Texas Bar, and frequently accompanies them to the first meeting with a client. After that, the students usually have most of the contact with clients, always subject to the supervision of the professor. A weekly meeting is held for general discussion of the particular projects.

5497 Transactional Clinic I - KAFAH BACHARI (offered in Summer I  2014)
Students advise small businesses and people trying to start small businesses about business structure, contracts, possible tax issues, commercial law matters and similar problems. Many of the small businesses raise sophisticated legal problems, while some are routine. Students work under a professor who is a member of the Texas Bar, and frequently accompanies them to the first meeting with a client. After that, the students usually have most of the contact with clients, always subject to the supervision of the professor. A weekly meeting is held for general discussion of the particular projects.

5497 Transactional Clinic II - KAFAH BACHARI (offered in Summer I  2014)
Students advise small businesses and people trying to start small businesses about business structure, contracts, possible tax issues, commercial law matters and similar problems. Many of the small businesses raise sophisticated legal problems, while some are routine. Students work under a professor who is a member of the Texas Bar, and frequently accompanies them to the first meeting with a client. After that, the students usually have most of the contact with clients, always subject to the supervision of the professor. A weekly meeting is held for general discussion of the particular projects.

5397 Transactional Clinic II - KAFAH BACHARI (offered in Summer I  2014)
Students advise small businesses and people trying to start small businesses about business structure, contracts, possible tax issues, commercial law matters and similar problems. Many of the small businesses raise sophisticated legal problems, while some are routine. Students work under a professor who is a member of the Texas Bar, and frequently accompanies them to the first meeting with a client. After that, the students usually have most of the contact with clients, always subject to the supervision of the professor. A weekly meeting is held for general discussion of the particular projects.

5497 Transactional Clinic II - KAFAH BACHARI (offered in Spring  2014)
Students advise small businesses and people trying to start small businesses about business structure, contracts, possible tax issues, commercial law matters and similar problems. Many of the small businesses raise sophisticated legal problems, while some are routine. Students work under a professor who is a member of the Texas Bar, and frequently accompanies them to the first meeting with a client. After that, the students usually have most of the contact with clients, always subject to the supervision of the professor. A weekly meeting is held for general discussion of the particular projects.

5397 Transactional Clinic II. - KAFAH BACHARI (offered in Spring  2014)

5397 Transnational Investment Law and Arbitration - CARDENAS (offered in Fall  2015)
The Transnational Investment Law and Arbitration course provides JD candidates and LLM students all the notions and tools necessary for the analysis and performance of complex legal issues related to foreign investment transactions, such as oil and gas, mining, and Transnational construction projects. During the last 50 years, more than 3000 Bilateral Investment Treaties have been agreed between nations. Also other Multilateral Investment Treaties such as NAFTA and the Energy Charter Treaty, have created a transnational network of sources of law to govern the interdependency relations between States and Transnational Corporations, for the development of local resources and services. This reality has created a specific System of Law to serve a community of investors and States, and has provided a special Jurisdiction for the settlement of disputes through transnational arbitration. Transnational Investment Law is one of the growing fields of transnational law that is currently undergoing a major evolution and expansion due to the levels of transparency of arbitration decisions. In this practice, the distinction between hard law and soft law has disappeared and new approaches are necessaries to perform the enforcement of these rules. Further, the amount of transnational investment litigation has increased in the last 15 years creating the framework for new standards and rules applicable for the placement of transnational investments. This evolution is shaping the way to do business in transnational investment projects in the energy, mining and the construction sector. The course shall be in the interest of students who want to develop a career as In-house Counsels or Law Firm attorneys, involved in transnational investment transactions in sectors such as the construction sector, service sector, oil and gas industry, mining projects and other extractive industries.

5397 Transnational Investment Law and Arbitration - CARDENAS (offered in Fall  2016)
The Transnational Investment Law and Arbitration course provides JD candidates and LLM students all the notions and tools necessary for the analysis and performance of complex legal issues related to foreign investment transactions, such as oil and gas, mining, and Transnational construction projects. During the last 50 years, more than 3000 Bilateral Investment Treaties have been agreed between nations. Also other Multilateral Investment Treaties such as NAFTA and the Energy Charter Treaty, have created a transnational network of sources of law to govern the interdependency relations between States and Transnational Corporations, for the development of local resources and services. This reality has created a specific System of Law to serve a community of investors and States, and has provided a special Jurisdiction for the settlement of disputes through transnational arbitration. Transnational Investment Law is one of the growing fields of transnational law that is currently undergoing a major evolution and expansion due to the levels of transparency of arbitration decisions. In this practice, the distinction between hard law and soft law has disappeared and new approaches are necessaries to perform the enforcement of these rules. Further, the amount of transnational investment litigation has increased in the last 15 years creating the framework for new standards and rules applicable for the placement of transnational investments. This evolution is shaping the way to do business in transnational investment projects in the energy, mining and the construction sector. The course shall be in the interest of students who want to develop a career as In-house Counsels or Law Firm attorneys, involved in transnational investment transactions in sectors such as the construction sector, service sector, oil and gas industry, mining projects and other extractive industries.

5397 Transnational Petroleum Law - CARDENAS (offered in Spring  2017)
This course features the transnational petroleum law method that provides the tools to understand the regulation that governs foreign investments in the oil and gas industry worldwide. The course will provide model contracts, standardized regulation and a collection of excerpts of arbitral awards in the oil industry which will guide our understanding of new practices in the oil and gas industry. Cases under study will cover oil and gas arbitration in Latin America, North America, Europe Asia, Africa and the Middle East. For example: cases of international arbitration related to expropriation or indirect expropriation in Russia, Venezuela and Ecuador; the use of industry best practices in Nigeria, Sudan, Mexico and Canada; the protection of foreign investments in the case of armed conflicts (Libya, Sudan and Colombia); repatriation of capital in Venezuela and dispute resolution practice for petroleum investment.

5397 Transnational Petroleum Law - CARDENAS (offered in Spring  2016)
This course features the transnational petroleum law method that provides the tools to understand the regulation that governs foreign investments in the oil and gas industry worldwide. The course will provide model contracts, standardized regulation and a collection of excerpts of arbitral awards in the oil industry which will guide our understanding of new practices in the oil and gas industry. Cases under study will cover oil and gas arbitration in Latin America, North America, Europe Asia, Africa and the Middle East. For example: cases of international arbitration related to expropriation or indirect expropriation in Russia, Venezuela and Ecuador; the use of industry best practices in Nigeria, Sudan, Mexico and Canada; the protection of foreign investments in the case of armed conflicts (Libya, Sudan and Colombia); repatriation of capital in Venezuela and dispute resolution practice for petroleum investment.

5397 Transnational Petroleum Law - CARDENAS (offered in Spring  2015)
Click here to see Prof. Julián Cárdenas García bio This course studies the transnational petroleum regulation that governs foreign investments in the oil industry worldwide. Transnational petroleum law is conceived as the rules of law, standards, usages and practices of the oil industry which transcend petroleum contracts and the territorial regulation of oil producing States. These rules of law are classified in two main groups: 1) The first group refers to the classic eight “investment standards” included in a network of International Investment Treaties and the interpretation of these standards by a number of published international arbitration awards. These standards govern the relation between foreign investors, service providers and the Host State in the oil industry. They govern issues such as expropriation, fair and equitable treatment, transfer of funds, umbrella clauses, most favorable nation treatment, national treatment, protection and security and Dispute Resolution. 2) The second group is found in the “industry standards” created by the petroleum industry which regulate issues such as the fight against corruption, the respect of human rights and the protection of the environment. The current enforcement of these standards in national courts and before international arbitration make these new rules of law a fundamental tool for the legal practice in the petroleum industry. Both kinds of standards are considered altogether “the network” that governs transnational petroleum operations for the 21st Century. Further, since much repetition exists among these rules, the transnational petroleum law approach will give you the tools to define, classify, identify, use and enforce these standards before arbitration tribunals. The course will also provide a collection of excerpts of arbitral awards in the oil industry which will guide our understanding of new practices in the oil and gas industry. Cases under study will cover oil and gas arbitration in Latin America, North America, Europe Asia, Africa and the Middle East. For example: cases of international arbitration related to expropriation or indirect expropriation in Russia, Venezuela and Ecuador; the use of industry best practices in Nigeria, Sudan, Mexico and Canada; the protection of foreign investments in the case of armed conflicts (Libya, Sudan and Colombia); repatriation of capital in Venezuela and dispute resolution practice for petroleum investment. The course will provide tools to develop legal skills acting as in-house counsel or as international attorney in the petroleum industry, such as: 1) To recognize petroleum industry best practices from State and Non-State sources of law applicable to petroleum investment projects, based in the review of petroleum contracts, petroleum industry standards and arbitration awards. 2) To identify new trends in transnational compliance and litigation involving international petroleum investments, in order to improve expertise on risk allocation, investment protection and regulation of foreign investments. 3) The practice of International Investment Treaties and the most relevant investment arbitration rules such as ICSID, ICC and UNCITRAL rules. 4) To build a global perspective of petroleum regulation through international investment treaties and best practices. Evaluation: 50% - Research paper 12-15 pages (due at end of semester). Research Paper: The paper will focus in the study of a case in an oil producing country. 50% - Exam: The exam to evaluate your knowledge on international investment standards. Open book final exam.

5397 Transnational Petroleum Law and Investment in Latin America - CARDENAS (offered in Spring  2014)
This course is designed to present transactional and litigation cases involving Latin American oil producing countries on issues of international investment law, international arbitration, human rights and environmental law, which considered altogether make a significant contribution to the development of a transnational petroleum law. Over the last decade, Latin America has been renowned as a strategic region for business in the international oil industry. The region is rich in natural resources and hydrocarbons reserves, and has attracted oil companies from all over the world to participate in upstream mega projects in traditional and emerging markets. However, it has been also the scenario of transnational litigation involving States and foreign investors, caused by expropriation waves, tax reforms and environmental claims. The course will provide tools to develop legal skills acting as in-house counsel or as international attorney in the petroleum industry, such as: 1) The identification of petroleum industry best practices from State and Non-State sources of law applicable to petroleum investment projects, based in the review of petroleum contracts, petroleum industry standards and arbitration awards. 2) The discovery of new trends in transnational compliance and litigation involving petroleum transactions in Latin America, in order to improve expertise on risk allocation, investment protection and regulation of foreign investment. 3) Becoming familiar with the review of Bilateral Investment Treaties and Multilateral Investment Treaties, and the most relevant investment arbitration rules such as ICSID, ICC and UNCITRAL rules. 4) Building a broad perspective of petroleum national regulation and transactions in seven countries in Latin America: Venezuela, Bolivia, Ecuador, Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Mexico. You may have access to a brief note of last semester course in the following link: Spring2013

5397 Trial Advocacy for Non-Litigators - SOLAR / LUKIN (offered in Spring  2016)
Trial Advocacy for Non-Litigators provides students who do not have any trial experience with a chance to gain basic litigation training. This class is ideal for students interested in transactional law who may encounter litigators in the course of their career. For example, when you draft a contract, you should know what happens next if someone breaches that contract. Or in-house counsel supervising an outside litigation firm should know exactly what that outside litigator does. The class is a mirror of the evening trial advocacy class, so students will learn the skills of direct examination, cross examination, opening statement, closing argument, and voir dire. Evidence is not a requirement for this course. Mock trial students or students with previous trial training are not eligible for this class.

5397 Trial Advocacy for Non-Litigators - SOLAR / LUKIN (offered in Spring  2017)
Trial Advocacy for Non-Litigators provides students who do not have any trial experience with a chance to gain basic litigation training. This class is ideal for students who plan to pursue a career as a transactional attorney, but want to acquire the knowledge and skills required to try a case. The class is a mirror of the evening trial advocacy class, so students will learn the skills of case analysis, direct examination, cross examination, opening statement, closing argument, and voir dire. The course provides learning by doing and requires skill performance by each student every week. The final examination is a full jury trial performed at the Harris County Courthouse. Evidence is not a requirement for this course. Evidentiary issues relating to the case files will be identified by faculty and discussed in class. Mock trial students or students with previous trial training are not eligible for this class.

7297 WRC: Advanced Legal Writing - MASELLI (offered in Fall  2016)
Course Description: This is an upper level class intended to help students become more proficient, efficient, and effective at researching, analyzing legal issues, and composing and organizing written documents. It will build on concepts learned in both LARC I and LARC II and will help students to refine and further develop problem solving, factual investigation and drafting skills. Assignments will include (1) writing a brief involving a complex legal issue; (2) drafting an opinion letters, attorney-client agreements and other reflective documents, and court documents, such as pleadings and motions; (3) communicating orally in motion hearings and client meetings.

7397 WRC: Banned Books - DOW (offered in Fall  2016)

7397 WRC: Consumer Credit Law and Policy - HAWKINS (offered in Fall  2014)
This course will consider a variety of different consumer credit products such as mortgages, credit cards, payday loans, and auto title loans. We will read and discuss law review articles, statutes, cases, and/or books that deal with the law that currently governs these products, and we will consider how to change the laws to meet policy goals and how to advise clients regarding these laws. Students' grades will be based on several expository writings (e.g., client letters, research memoranda, court documents, and short articles similar to those that appear in bar journals) and on class participation. This class satisfies the Law Center's Upper Level Writing Requirement.

7397 WRC: Contract Drafting - TOEDT (offered in Spring  2015)
The goal of this course is to help students prepare for a type of assignment they will likely see throughout their careers: that of drafting, reviewing, analyzing, explaining, and negotiating contracts. Students will: • explore various legal- and business issues that might need to be addressed in various types of contract (see the list below); • study principles of plain-English drafting for contracts and other legal documents; • review the etiquette and ethics of contract negotiations; • survey some legal pitfalls that could lead to jail time for both clients and lawyers, such as backdating contracts, violating antitrust laws, failing to comply with Sarbanes-Oxley Act obligations, paying off foreign officials, etc. • discuss how to tactfully advise clients (and supervising lawyers) about their options, so as to earn a reputation as a deal-maker, not a deal-breaker; • compare and contrast the roles of outside- versus in-house counsel in contract negotiations; • consider ways of positioning the client for future litigation, just in case. The types of contract to be studied will include some or all of: • employment agreements for employees and executives • lease agreements • distribution agreements • services agreements • license agreements • stock-option agreements • change-of-control agreements for employees and executives • arbitration agreements • settlement agreements • merger agreements • letters of intent / memoranda of understanding As in past years, the course will include several presentations by panels of experienced local lawyers about specific types of contracts, with ample opportunity for Q&A. A business background is helpful but not required; all necessary business information will be covered in class and/or in reading materials.

7397 WRC: Contract Drafting - TOEDT (offered in Fall  2015)
The goal of this course is to help students prepare for a type of assignment they will likely see throughout their careers: that of drafting, reviewing, analyzing, explaining, and negotiating contracts. Students will: • explore various legal- and business issues that might need to be addressed in various types of contract (see the list below); • study principles of plain-English drafting for contracts and other legal documents; • review the etiquette and ethics of contract negotiations; • survey some legal pitfalls that could lead to jail time for both clients and lawyers, such as backdating contracts, violating antitrust laws, failing to comply with Sarbanes-Oxley Act obligations, paying off foreign officials, etc. • discuss how to tactfully advise clients (and supervising lawyers) about their options, so as to earn a reputation as a deal-maker, not a deal-breaker; • compare and contrast the roles of outside- versus in-house counsel in contract negotiations; • consider ways of positioning the client for future litigation, just in case. The types of contract to be studied will include some or all of: • employment agreements for employees and executives • lease agreements • distribution agreements • services agreements • license agreements • stock-option agreements • change-of-control agreements for employees and executives • arbitration agreements • settlement agreements • merger agreements • letters of intent / memoranda of understanding A business background is helpful but not required; all necessary business information will be covered in class and/or in reading materials.

7397 WRC: Contract Drafting - TOEDT (offered in Spring  2016)
The goal of this course is to help students prepare for a type of assignment they will likely see throughout their careers: that of drafting, reviewing, analyzing, explaining, and negotiating contracts. Students will: • explore various legal- and business issues that might need to be addressed in various types of contract (see the list below); • study principles of plain-English drafting for contracts and other legal documents; • review the etiquette and ethics of contract negotiations; • survey some legal pitfalls that could lead to jail time for both clients and lawyers, such as backdating contracts, violating antitrust laws, failing to comply with Sarbanes-Oxley Act obligations, paying off foreign officials, etc. • discuss how to tactfully advise clients (and supervising lawyers) about their options, so as to earn a reputation as a deal-maker, not a deal-breaker; • compare and contrast the roles of outside- versus in-house counsel in contract negotiations; • consider ways of positioning the client for future litigation, just in case. The types of contract to be studied will include some or all of: • employment agreements for employees and executives • lease agreements • distribution agreements • services agreements • license agreements • stock-option agreements • change-of-control agreements for employees and executives • arbitration agreements • settlement agreements • merger agreements • letters of intent / memoranda of understanding A business background is helpful but not required; all necessary business information will be covered in class and/or in reading materials.

7397 WRC: Contract Drafting - TOEDT (offered in Spring  2017)
The goal of this course is to help students prepare for a type of assignment they will likely see throughout their careers: that of drafting, reviewing, analyzing, explaining, and negotiating contracts. Students will: • explore various legal- and business issues that might need to be addressed in various types of contract (see the list below); • study principles of plain-English drafting for contracts and other legal documents; • review the etiquette and ethics of contract negotiations; • survey some legal pitfalls that could lead to jail time for both clients and lawyers, such as backdating contracts, violating antitrust laws, failing to comply with Sarbanes-Oxley Act obligations, paying off foreign officials, etc. • discuss how to tactfully advise clients (and supervising lawyers) about their options, so as to earn a reputation as a deal-maker, not a deal-breaker; • compare and contrast the roles of outside- versus in-house counsel in contract negotiations; • consider ways of positioning the client for future litigation, just in case. The types of contract to be studied will include some or all of: • employment agreements for employees and executives • lease agreements • distribution agreements • services agreements • license agreements • stock-option agreements • change-of-control agreements for employees and executives • arbitration agreements • settlement agreements • merger agreements • letters of intent / memoranda of understanding A business background is helpful but not required; all necessary business information will be covered in class and/or in reading materials.

7397 WRC: Domestic Violence Law - HEPPARD/STALDER (offered in Fall  2015)
Quota= 14. Students will work individually and in small groups as they learn about the State laws, Federal Laws, and case law related to issues surrounding Domestic Violence. The topics may include domestic violence in the family code, criminal laws dealing with family violence, employment laws relating to family violence, and immigration and domestic violence. Writing assignments may include short articles, letters (e.g., demand, opposing counsel, client, court), pleadings, motions, and one longer paper on a chosen topic related to domestic violence. Each student will complete three to five practical writing assignments, with total production of at least twenty-one pages, based on an average of 250-300 words per double-spaced page.

7397 WRC: E-Health - SCOTT (offered in Spring  2016)
This course was inadvertently listed as a writing seminar but it is a writing course. This course will examine regulatory approaches to new technology, including health information technology (HIT), by state legislatures, boards of medicine and pharmacy, and federal agencies including the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). We will address healthcare privacy (including HIPAA-the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act), regulation of physicians practicing medicine via the Internet, Internet pharmacies and e-prescribing, electronic health records, personal health records maintained online, and regulation of iPhone apps as “medical devices.” We will also discuss use of social media such as Facebook and Twitter by healthcare providers and the legal and ethical considerations arising from such use. The Internet is largely unregulated, and reaches across state and international borders. Physicians, pharmacies, pharmacists, and other health care providers have historically been regulated by the states. Perceived abuses by virtual pharmacies and physicians prescribing drugs based on on-line consultations have resulted in state and federal regulatory responses, together with attempts at self-regulation. Consumers are concerned about the privacy of health information they provide to e-health Web sites for the purpose of getting answers to medical questions, learning about new therapies, or accessing other health-related information. Physicians’ and patients’ use of social networking sites such as Facebook has raised new privacy concerns. Cybermedicine (on-line consultations) also presents newly emerging liability exposures for physicians. Mobile health devices such as the iPhone have also triggered regulatory responses from the FDA. Physicians are using the iPhone to access patients’ medical records, to electronically prescribe drugs, and order needed medical tests such as lab work. More than 1400 health care apps are available for the iPhone including apps that check medication dosing and allow obstetricians to monitor a baby’s heartbeat remotely. Powerful apps converting iPhones and smartphones into electrocardiographs, electronic stethoscopes and glucose monitors have prompted the FDA to regulate some of the apps as “medical devices” under federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. Physicians, hospitals, insurers and other stakeholders in health care are already asking e-health questions. Should a physician communicate via e-mail with her patients? The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (federal health reform law) includes provisions that encourage physicians and hospitals to deploy electronic health records (EHR). How can a hospital comply with federal law when it moves to electronic health records? Join us to learn the answer to these and other cutting-edge legal issues. This course will have three short papers rather than one long paper, in accordance with the alternative revised Upper Level Writing Requirement for a “Writing Course.” The requirements state in part: “Students in a Writing Course must complete several kinds of practical writing assignments. Assignments must be no more than 2,500 words each, when feasible. Instructors have discretion over the kind and number of assignments students complete; however, students must complete at least 5,000 words of writing over the course of the semester.” In this course, students will complete three assignments. The first assignment will be a client letter reviewing and analyzing a proposed or recently enacted statute or a proposed or enacted regulation. For example, in 2013, new regulations and guidance addressed prescription refill reminders under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), i.e., when such reminders constitute “marketing” and require an “authorization” from the patient. . Students could be asked to explain the regulations to clients. The second assignment is also a client letter, but will require students to answer a specific legal question or questions posed by the professor related to the class. The final assignment is mini-thesis on a subject chosen by the student (related to the course). It should be similar to a bar journal type article. The final assignment will be due during finals, after the course is finished, but a draft will be due earlier, during the course. For each of the assignments, students must submit a draft. I will provide detailed comments on the drafts which I will expect you to incorporate into the final versions of the papers. Each of these assignments should be a minimum of 2000 words each not including footnotes (About 8 pages double spaced). The total of all assignments must total 5000 words to meet the Upper Level Writing Requirement. Revised 11/16/2015

7397 WRC: Federal Pretrial Drafting - BREM (offered in Spring  2016)
Federal Pretrial Drafting is an upper level writing class designed to prepare students for “real world” litigation practice after law school. In the context of a single federal court case, students will draft basic pleadings, some minimal discovery documents, a short motion for summary judgment and accompanying response, and a mediation statement. Lectures will cover requirements for these documents under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, but also enable students to refine their factual investigation, legal analysis and drafting skills. Students will receive ample feedback and opportunities to rewrite certain assignments to further hone these essential practice tools. Grading. The motion for summary judgment and response, along with associated rewrites, will comprise 50% of your final grade.  Discovery documents and any associated rewrites will comprise 20% of your final grade.  Your remaining grade will be apportioned at 10% each among the following assignments: the complaint; the answer; and the mediation statement. I will not be assigning any textbooks for the class.

7397 WRC: Federal Pretrial Drafting - BREM (offered in Spring  2017)
Federal Pretrial Drafting is an upper level writing class designed to prepare students for “real world” litigation practice after law school. In the context of a single federal court case, students will draft basic pleadings, some minimal discovery documents, a short motion for summary judgment and accompanying response, and a mediation statement. Lectures will cover requirements for these documents under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, but also enable students to refine their factual investigation, legal analysis and drafting skills. Students will receive ample feedback and opportunities to rewrite certain assignments to further hone these essential practice tools. Grading. The motion for summary judgment and response, along with associated rewrites, will comprise 50% of your final grade.  Discovery documents and any associated rewrites will comprise 20% of your final grade.  Your remaining grade will be apportioned at 10% each among the following assignments: the complaint; the answer; and the mediation statement. I will not be assigning any textbooks for the class.

7397 WRC: Health Regulatory Process - MANTEL (offered in Spring  2017)
This course explores how legal and policy considerations, intra-governmental relationships, and political dynamics influence health regulatory policies. Guest speakers will include current and former U.S. Department of Health and Human Services officials and health care advocates.

7397 WRC: Health Regulatory Process - MANTEL (offered in Spring  2016)
This course explores how legal and policy considerations, intra-governmental relationships, and political dynamics influence health regulatory policies. Guest speakers will include current and former U.S. Department of Health and Human Services officials and health care advocates.

7397 WRC: Law and Social Science - KWOK (offered in Spring  2017)
This course focuses on the role of the social sciences within the legal system. We will look at the impact of social science research and evidence in a variety of contexts, including trademark, damages, school segregation, and tort liability. For example, how should courts use survey evidence in determining whether trademarks cause confusion in the marketplace? The social sciences include the disciplines of psychology, economics, sociology, and anthropology. Students should expect to gain sufficient scientific literacy to critically read and apply social science research.

7397 WRC: Making and Drafting Contracts - LINZER (offered in Spring  2017)
The most important function a contract lawyer has is to make any legitimate desires of the client work, to achieve results. This course, which satisfies the upper-class writing requirement, will focus both on drafting skills and on other aspects of how lawyers help their clients to make contracts. This includes how to find out just what the client wants; how to learn the details of his business and the law that will govern the transaction; and the ethics of contract practice. We will begin with short sub-courses in drafting and negotiating, but the bulk of the course will be hands-on writing, detailed comments by the instructor and revisions by the student, with extensive feedback from the professor throughout the semester.

7397 WRC: Making and Drafting Contracts - LINZER (offered in Fall  2016)
The most important function a contract lawyer has is to make any legitimate desires of the client work, to achieve results. This course, which satisfies the upper-class writing requirement, will focus both on drafting skills and on other aspects of how lawyers help their clients to make contracts. This includes how to find out just what the client wants; how to learn the details of his business and the law that will govern the transaction; and the ethics of contract practice. We will begin with short sub-courses in drafting and negotiating, but the bulk of the course will be hands-on writing, detailed comments by the instructor and revisions by the student, with extensive feedback from the professor throughout the semester.

7397 WRC: Making and Drafting Contracts - LINZER (offered in Spring  2016)
The most important function a contract lawyer has is to make any legitimate desires of the client work, to achieve results. This course, which satisfies the upper-class writing requirement, will focus both on drafting skills and on other aspects of how lawyers help their clients to make contracts. This includes how to find out just what the client wants; how to learn the details of his business and the law that will govern the transaction; and the ethics of contract practice. We will begin with short sub-courses in drafting and negotiating, but the bulk of the course will be hands-on writing, detailed comments by the instructor and revisions by the student, with extensive feedback from the professor throughout the semester.

7397 WRC: Making and Drafting Contracts - LINZER (offered in Fall  2015)
The most important function a contract lawyer has is to make any legitimate desires of the client work, to achieve results. This course, which satisfies the upper-class writing requirement, will focus both on drafting skills and on other aspects of how lawyers help their clients to make contracts. This includes how to find out just what the client wants; how to learn the details of his business and the law that will govern the transaction; and the ethics of contract practice. We will begin with short sub-courses in drafting and negotiating, but the bulk of the course will be hands-on writing, detailed comments by the instructor and revisions by the student, with extensive feedback from the professor throughout the semester.

5297 WRC: Making and Drafting Contracts - LINZER (offered in Spring  2015)
The most important function a contract lawyer has is to make any legitimate desires of the client work, to achieve results. This course, which satisfies the upper-class writing requirement, will focus both on drafting skills and on other aspects of how lawyers help their clients to make contracts. This includes how to find out just what the client wants; how to learn the details of his business and the law that will govern the transaction; and the ethics of contract practice. We will begin with short sub-courses in drafting and negotiating, but the bulk of the course will be hands-on writing, detailed comments by the instructor and revisions by the student, with extensive feedback from the professor throughout the semester.

5397 WRC: Practice-based Legal Writing - TABOR (offered in Fall  2014)
Course name: Practice-based Legal Writing Course credit and size: Three credit hours; maximum 12 students Course description: Students will have varied opportunities to write and receive feedback on their writing in transactional and litigation contexts. Writing assignments may include short articles, letters (e.g., demand, opposing counsel, client, court), objective analyses, pleadings, motions, private rule-making documents: policies/procedures (e.g., promotion, protection of individual rights, discipline), and contracts or contract excerpts. Each student will complete three to five practical writing assignments, with total production of at least twenty-one pages, based on an average of 250-300 words per double-spaced page. Some assignments may require research. Each assignment will require the student to submit a first draft, which will be returned with written feedback, and a final version that is rewritten to incorporate the draft feedback. In addition to any conference scheduled for document feedback or review, each student will be offered opportunities to meet in conference with the professor for individualized assessment of the student’s writing. No text is required.

7397 WRC: Practice-based Legal Writing - TABOR (offered in Spring  2015)
Students will have varied opportunities to write and receive feedback on their writing in transactional and litigation contexts. Writing assignments may include short articles, letters (e.g., demand, opposing counsel, client, court), pleadings, motions, policies/procedures (e.g., promotion, protection of individual rights, discipline), and contracts or contract excerpts. Each student will complete three to five practical writing assignments, with total production of at least twenty-one pages, based on an average of 250-300 words per double-spaced page. Some assignments may require research. Each assignment will require the student to submit a first draft, which will be returned with written feedback, a second draft, for which feedback may be written or oral, and a final version that is rewritten to incorporate the second-draft feedback. In addition to any conference scheduled for second-draft feedback, each student will be offered opportunities to meet in conference with the professor for individualized assessment of the student’s writing. No text is required.

7397 WRC: Practice-based Legal Writing - TILTON-McCARTHY (offered in Spring  2015)
Course Outline: Lawyering Skills and Strategies II will focus on legal writing in litigation and transactional contexts and the skills and strategic planning lawyers must possess to succeed within actual lawyering experiences. The curriculum will be problem – based, using fact-pattern simulations to enable students to work through actual practice skills and strategies and ethical issues. Training in essential lawyering skills such as oral communication, legal writing, research, and analysis will be embedded within fact pattern simulations involving typical litigation and transactional issues that students will work through to develop lawyering skills and problem-solving strategies. Students at times will be assigned to represent opposing sides of the problem.

7397 WRC: Practice-based Legal Writing - TABOR (offered in Spring  2016)
Course name: Practice-based Legal Writing Course credit and size: Three credit hours; maximum 12 students Course description: Students will have varied opportunities to write and receive feedback on their writing in transactional and litigation contexts. Writing assignments may include short articles, letters (e.g., demand, opposing counsel, client, court), objective analyses, pleadings, motions, private rule-making documents: policies/procedures (e.g., promotion, protection of individual rights, discipline), and contracts or contract excerpts. Each student will complete three to five practical writing assignments, with total production of at least twenty-one pages, based on an average of 250-300 words per double-spaced page. Some assignments may require research. Each assignment will require the student to submit a first draft, which will be returned with written feedback, and a final version that is rewritten to incorporate the draft feedback. In addition to any conference scheduled for document feedback or review, each student will be offered opportunities to meet in conference with the professor for individualized assessment of the student’s writing. No text is required.

7397 WRC: Practice-based Legal Writing - TILTON-McCARTHY (offered in Spring  2016)
Course Outline: Lawyering Skills and Strategies II will focus on legal writing in litigation and transactional contexts and the skills and strategic planning lawyers must possess to succeed within actual lawyering experiences. The curriculum will be problem – based, using fact-pattern simulations to enable students to work through actual practice skills and strategies and ethical issues. Training in essential lawyering skills such as oral communication, legal writing, research, and analysis will be embedded within fact pattern simulations involving typical litigation and transactional issues that students will work through to develop lawyering skills and problem-solving strategies. Students at times will be assigned to represent opposing sides of the problem.

7397 WRC: Practice-based Legal Writing - TABOR (offered in Fall  2015)
Course name: Practice-based Legal Writing Course credit and size: Three credit hours; maximum 12 students Course description: Students will have varied opportunities to write and receive feedback on their writing in transactional and litigation contexts. Writing assignments may include short articles, letters (e.g., demand, opposing counsel, client, court), objective analyses, pleadings, motions, private rule-making documents: policies/procedures (e.g., promotion, protection of individual rights, discipline), and contracts or contract excerpts. Each student will complete three to five practical writing assignments, with total production of at least twenty-one pages, based on an average of 250-300 words per double-spaced page. Some assignments may require research. Each assignment will require the student to submit a first draft, which will be returned with written feedback, and a final version that is rewritten to incorporate the draft feedback. In addition to any conference scheduled for document feedback or review, each student will be offered opportunities to meet in conference with the professor for individualized assessment of the student’s writing. No text is required.

7397 WRC: Practice-based Legal Writing - TILTON-McCARTHY (offered in Spring  2017)
Course Outline: Lawyering Skills and Strategies II will focus on legal writing in litigation and transactional contexts and the skills and strategic planning lawyers must possess to succeed within actual lawyering experiences. The curriculum will be problem – based, using fact-pattern simulations to enable students to work through actual practice skills and strategies and ethical issues. Training in essential lawyering skills such as oral communication, legal writing, research, and analysis will be embedded within fact pattern simulations involving typical litigation and transactional issues that students will work through to develop lawyering skills and problem-solving strategies. Students at times will be assigned to represent opposing sides of the problem.

7397 WRC: Supreme Court Term - DOW (offered in Spring  2016)
Supreme Court Term covers between 12 and 20 cases from the Supreme Court's most recent term. The spring 2016 course will therefore cover cases from the October 2014 Term. Cases will not be announced until the first day of class. The objectives of the class are to gain basic familiarity with a diverse range of subject matter of current interest or importance to the Supreme Court, and to examine judicial opinions deeply and critically. The course will be divided into two groups of cases, and students will be required to write one paper for each group. Each paper will deal with a single case on the syllabus, and must satisfy two objectives: first, it must situate the decision in the legal landscape of which it is a part; second, it must explain in careful detail either the principal strength or principal weakness of any of the case's major opinions. Papers will be assessed based on their analytical content and quality of writing.

7397 WRC: Writing for Criminal Defense - MASELLI (offered in Spring  2016)
This is an upper level class intended to help students become more proficient, efficient, and effective at researching, analyzing legal issues, and composing and organizing written documents in criminal cases. It will build on concepts learned in your first year writing class and will help students to refine and further develop problem solving, factual investigation and drafting skills.

7397 WRC: Writing for Criminal Defense - MASELLI (offered in Spring  2015)

7397 WRC: Writing for Criminal Defense - MASELLI (offered in Spring  2017)
This is an upper level class intended to help students become more proficient, efficient, and effective at researching, analyzing legal issues, and composing and organizing written documents in criminal cases. It will build on concepts learned in your first year writing class and will help students to refine and further develop problem solving, factual investigation and drafting skills.

7397 WRC: Written Advocacy - HOFFMANL (offered in Spring  2017)
Course Outline: This three credit course satisfies the law school’s Upper Level Writing Requirement and is intended for students who want to improve their persuasive writing skills, especially for those who expect to have a civil litigation practice after law school. Over the semester, we will work on different short writing assignments. Students will do multiple drafts of each assignment and receive feedback from the professor on each draft to help them gain a sharper understanding of their writing tendencies and develop better writing skills and habits. There is no final exam.

7297 WRC:Advanced Legal Writing - MASELLI (offered in Fall  2015)
Course Description: Writing for Criminal Defense is an upper level class intended to help students become more proficient, efficient, and effective at researching and analyzing criminal law issues, and composing and organizing written documents. It will build on concepts learned in first year and will help students to refine and further develop problem solving, factual investigation and drafting skills. Assignments will include (1) writing a brief involving a complex legal issue; (2) drafting motions and other related documents, such as objections and memorandum; (3) communicating orally in motion hearings and client meetings. Assignments: There will be three graded writing assignments throughout the semester. The final brief will account for 50% of your grade. The other writing assignments will each account for 25% of your final grade. There will be ungraded writing assignments, as well.

5397 Written Advocacy - HOFFMANL (offered in Spring  2014)
In this three-hour credit course, which does not satisfy the UHLC writing requirement, you will receive extensive feedback from the instructor on your writing. The course is intended for students who wish to improve their persuasive writing skills, especially for civil litigation practice. In our initial meetings we will discuss basic strategies for approaching a problem that calls for a written answer and analysis. Over the course of the semester, we will work on different writing assignments. You will do multiple drafts of each assignment. The ultimate goal of the class is for you to gain a better understanding of your own writing talent and tendencies and develop better writing skills and habits.

7397 WRS: Advanced Topics in Copyright Law - JOYCE (offered in Fall  2015)
Discussions, preparation of two drafts of paper, presentations of papers, final paper.

7297 WRS: Advanced Topics in Family Law - OLDHAM (offered in Spring  2016)
Advanced Topics in Family Law - Current Issues in Adoption and Assisted Reproduction is a seminar whose main focus is to allow students to complete a research paper relating to family law. The paper, which will satisfy the UH Law writing requirement, needs to be 35 pages long. After submitting a detailed outline, one draft will need to be submitted before the final version.

7397 WRS: Advanced Topics in Intellectual Property - VETTER (offered in Spring  2016)
A seminar course to study the process of writing a large work and to study advanced topics in intellectual property or information law, typically within trade secrets, patents, trademark, copyright, or information law topics such as privacy, data security, licensing, cyberlaw or internet law. The study is through authorship of a seminar paper that meets the Law Center's upper level writing requirement. Topics should be chosen and approved during the break between the Fall and Spring semesters, so that the mainline research can be done during the break. The paper will be due in four finished, graded parts: approximately one month, two months, and three months into the semester; and the last submittal of the final paper, due at the beginning of the spring exam period. More details about grading structure and class meetings are available at the course web page.

7397 WRS: Advanced Topics in Intellectual Property - VETTER (offered in Spring  2017)
A seminar course to study the process of writing a large work and to study advanced topics in intellectual property or information law, typically within trade secrets, patents, trademark, copyright, or information law topics such as privacy, data security, licensing, cyberlaw or internet law. The study is through authorship of a seminar paper that meets the Law Center's upper level writing requirement. Topics should be chosen and approved during the break between the Fall and Spring semesters, so that the mainline research can be done during the break. The paper will be due in four finished, graded parts: approximately one month, two months, and three months into the semester; and the last submittal of the final paper, due at the beginning of the spring exam period. More details about grading structure and class meetings are available at the course web page.

7397 WRS: Advanced Torts - DUNCAN (offered in Fall  2016)
This seminar provides an opportunity for further exploration of tort law, beyond that of the typical first year torts course.

7397 WRS: Consumer Credit Law and Policy - HAWKINS (offered in Fall  2015)
This course will consider a variety of different consumer credit products such as mortgages, credit cards, payday loans, and auto title loans. We will read and discuss law review articles, statutes, cases, and/or books that deal with the law that currently governs these products, and we will consider how to change the laws to meet policy goals. Students' grades will be based on an outline, rough draft, final paper, and presentation on a consumer credit topic, and on class participation.

7397 WRS: Criminal Evidence - THOMPSON/SECREST (offered in Spring  2017)

7397 WRS: Early American Legal History - PALMER (offered in Spring  2015)
Survey of American Legal and Constitutional History, primarily from 1776 to 1940, with an emphasis on rights, federalism (both state and federal constitutional law), and constitutional ideas embedded in the common law.

7397 WRS: Early American Legal History - PALMER (offered in Spring  2016)
Survey of American Legal and Constitutional History, primarily from 1776 to 1940, with an emphasis on rights, federalism (both state and federal constitutional law), and constitutional ideas embedded in the common law.

7397 WRS: Federal Natural Resources - BURKE (offered in Fall  2014)
This seminar will examine some of the mechanisms for the management, preservation, conservation, use, and enjoyment of natural resources on federal land and the Outer Continental Shelf. These resources include wildlife, wilderness, refuges, rivers, national parks, National Conservation Landscape System lands, minerals, conventional and renewable energy, and timber. This course considers the history, jurisdiction, and conflicts of the natural resource management agencies (primarily the U.S. Forest Service and the Department of the Interior) under the various natural resources statutes such as the Endangered Species Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, the Federal Land Policy and Management Act, the General Mining Law, the Mineral Leasing Act, and the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to name just a few. Current issues to be considered include development of renewable energy on federal lands and on the Outer Continental Shelf, hydraulic fracturing, species listings and critical habitat designations, oil and gas development in the Arctic, wild horses and burros, and other challenging natural resource management issues. Although there is not a very much federal public land in Texas, almost every major energy company in the United States and many international energy companies have significant interests on federal lands and in federal waters. If you plan to practice environmental, energy, or natural resources law, this seminar will provide you with exposure and understanding of the major issues facing the managers and users of federal natural resources today.

7297 WRS: Federal Natural Resources - MORATH (offered in Spring  2017)
This seminar is an introductory course in Natural Resources Law. We will examine some of the mechanisms for managing, preserving, conserving, using, and enjoying natural resources on federal lands. As distinguished from environmental law, natural resources law has traditionally dealt with the laws and regulations that pertain to extractive or consumptive industries – mining, forestry, fisheries, oil and gas, to name a few. By contrast, environmental law has traditionally dealt with "pollution" issues, situations where there is some tangible, more obvious harm to the environment, such as the spillage of some toxic materials. In practice, of course the distinction is quite blurry; many "natural resource" problems wind up implicating "environmental" laws, and vice versa. Some of the natural resource statutes addressed in this course include: the Endangered Species Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, the Marine Mammal Protection Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act, the Federal Land Policy and Management Act, the General Mining Law, the Mineral Leasing Act, and the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. If you plan to practice environmental, energy, or natural resources law, this seminar will provide you with exposure and understanding of the major issues facing the managers and users of federal natural resources today.

7397 WRS: Hot Topics in Criminal Law & Procedure - THOMPSON (offered in Fall  2015)
The seminar in “Hot Topics in Criminal Law and Procedure” will meet to discuss readings on some of the most pressing issues in the field. We will discuss readings that include law review articles, case law, and other types of materials. Topics may include forensic science evidence, wrongful convictions, cell phone searches, race in criminal justice, and legalization of marijuana, among other topics. In addition, there is an optional field trip to a local area prison. The course is graded based on class preparation and participation and the writing of a 35-page seminar paper. A law librarian and a member of the Lawyering Skills and Strategies program will meet with the class to provide guidance on researching and writing the seminar paper.

7397 WRS: Human Rights - PAUST (offered in Spring  2016)
Seminar description:
Human Rights Seminar (Prof. Paust) (3 units)

The seminar will address the nature, sources and types of human rights; past forms of and possibilities for domestic incorporation and litigation of human rights law and the primacy of international or domestic laws in case of conflict. Attention will also be paid to international and domestic arrangements designed to promote better implementation of human rights. Particular attention will be paid to the major international human rights instruments and to issues concerning inhumane treatment and forced disappearance of individuals. A paper is required.

7397 WRS: International Law & Use of Force - PAUST (offered in Fall  2015)
The seminar will focus on international legal issues relating to the use of armed force, including attention to various permissible uses of force and criminal responsibility for use of illegal force; U.S. constitutional issues concerning decisions to use armed force abroad; terrorism; permissible detention of individuals under international law; interrogation tactics, and relevant war crimes and individual responsibility. A paper is required.

7397 WRS: Local Controls, Land Development, Public Rights, and Private Conservation - BRAY (offered in Summer II  2014)
The seminar on Local Controls, Land Development, Public Rights, and Private Conservation will cover a wide range of substantive issues related to property law, natural resources, land use, land development, and state and local regulation. We will also focus on legal research and writing techniques. The course will be graded primarily on the writing of a seminar paper, which will satisfy the Law Center’s writing requirement, as well as class participation. The class is currently scheduled to meet regularly during the Summer II session, which runs from June 2 – July 8, 2014. In order to ensure that students have enough time to develop a seminar paper that will satisfy the Law Center’s writing requirement, only rough drafts of the paper will be due at the end of the seminar’s regular class meetings in July, at which time students will receive a grade of incomplete. Final drafts of the seminar paper will not be due until early August, at the end of the Law Center’s summer schedule, at which time Professor Bray will enter final grades for this seminar. To ensure that enrolled students complete the paper in the time allotted, prior to the first class session interested students must first choose a topic for the paper, and then meet with Professor Bray to discuss the topic. Subsequent class discussions during the Summer II session will involve individual presentations of the students’ research and draft papers as well as group discussions about relevant assigned readings.

7397 WRS: ObamaCare - CHANDLER (offered in Spring  2016)
This seminar will address the Affordable Care Act. Areas to be studied include the main provisions of Title I of the ACA, including establishment of Exchanges, underwriting restrictions, the individual mandate, the employer mandate, subsidization of insurers (the “3Rs”), regulation of large group health plans, and regulation of small group plans. Medicare reforms and the expansion of Medicaid will also be studied along with a brief look at treatment of immigrants, reform of the Indian Health Service and a repealed section of the ACA that addressed long term care insurance. We will study the content of the law, its implementation and the separation of powers, administration law, and federalism issues raised thereby. We will also spend some time looking at regulation of health insurance prior to the ACA, performance of the ACA in achieving its goals, and potential reforms advocated by various critics ranging from those who want to “repeal and replace” to those who want a socialized medical system. Students will have the opportunity to write on topics of their choice relating to Obamacare.

7397 WRS: Scientific Evidence - SANDERS (offered in Fall  2015)
The purpose of this seminar is to offer an overview of topics in scientific evidence with a focus on mass and toxic torts. The primary impetus for the seminar is three United States Supreme Court opinions addressing the admissibility of expert testimony. In the first of these cases, Daubert v. Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals, Inc., 509 U.S. 579, 113 S. Ct. 2786 (1993), the Court determined that the rule in Frye v. United States, 293 F. 1013 (D.C. Cir. 1923) that established the general acceptance test of the admissibility of scientific evidence did not survive the adoption of the Federal Rules of Evidence in 1975. The Daubert court then sketched out the factors trial courts might consider in determining admissibility. In the opinion of many, the “Daubert revolution” has opened a new period in the relationship between science and law. Trial court judges have been invited to take a much more active role in determining admissibility, an invitation that a number of courts have already accepted. The Daubert opinion also has caused people to reconsider how expert testimony should be presented to courts. Although Daubert first emerged and took root in mass tort cases (Daubert concerns the drug Bendectin), its reach has steadily expanded into nearly every area of expert witnessing. Each person in the seminar has two obligations: a) to read the materials and participate in class and b) to write a term paper. As to the first obligation, there is alot of reading. I expect everyone to have read each week material prior to class. If you think this will not be possible, you should not take this course. The grade in the course will be based primarily on the second requirement, the term paper.

7397 WRS: Securities Regulation - BRITTON (offered in Spring  2015)
A study of the basic principles of our unique system of securities regulation. Among the areas addressed are jurisdiction, the identification of securities and the analysis and evaluation of the disclosure philosophy as it pertains to domestic and international offerings as well as under state "blue sky" laws. Special emphasis is given to the importance of the principal exemptions form registration under the 1933 Act, and to consequent civil liabilities for unregistered offerings or inadequate disclosure in filed documents.

7397 WRS: Securities Regulation - BRITTON (offered in Spring  2016)
A study of the basic principles of our unique system of securities regulation. Among the areas addressed are jurisdiction, the identification of securities and the analysis and evaluation of the disclosure philosophy as it pertains to domestic and international offerings as well as under state "blue sky" laws. Special emphasis is given to the importance of the principal exemptions form registration under the 1933 Act, and to consequent civil liabilities for unregistered offerings or inadequate disclosure in filed documents.

7397 WRS: Securities Regulation - BRITTON (offered in Spring  2017)
A study of the basic principles of our unique system of securities regulation. Among the areas addressed are jurisdiction, the identification of securities and the analysis and evaluation of the disclosure philosophy as it pertains to domestic and international offerings as well as under state "blue sky" laws. Special emphasis is given to the importance of the principal exemptions form registration under the 1933 Act, and to consequent civil liabilities for unregistered offerings or inadequate disclosure in filed documents.

7397 WRS: The Modern Corporation and Society - NELSON (offered in Spring  2017)
This course will consider the role of modern business corporations in society. Should corporations be run exclusively in the interests of shareholders? How should boards of directors manage the claims of various groups affected by corporations? By what standards should we judge executive compensation? Should corporations be entitled to claim various constitutional rights, including freedoms of speech, association, and religion? After surveying foundational work in corporate theory, we will address these questions through a close reading of materials in law, economics, political theory, and business ethics.

7397 WRS: The Modern Corporation and Society - NELSON (offered in Fall  2016)
This course will consider the role of modern business corporations in society. Should corporations be run exclusively in the interests of shareholders? How should boards of directors manage the claims of various groups affected by corporations? By what standards should we judge executive compensation? Should corporations be entitled to claim various constitutional rights, including freedoms of speech, association, and religion? After surveying foundational work in corporate theory, we will address these questions through a close reading of materials in law, economics, political theory, and business ethics.

7397 WRS:Juvenile Justice/Children and the Law - MARRUS (offered in Spring  2015)
This is a seminar writing course in which students may delve into various topics involving children and the law. The subject matter may involve issues of juvenile justice, child welfare (dependency), education, or health care. Students will be responsible for completing two drafts prior to the writing of the final paper and making a presentation to the class.

7397 WRS:The Modern Corporation and Society - NELSON (offered in Spring  2016)
This course will consider the role of modern business corporations in society. Should corporations be run exclusively in the interests of shareholders? How should boards of directors manage the claims of various groups affected by corporations? By what standards should we judge executive compensation? Should corporations be entitled to claim various constitutional rights, including freedoms of speech, association, and religion? After surveying foundational work in corporate theory, we will address these questions through a close reading of materials in law, economics, political theory, and business ethics.