Previous Selected Topics Courses (Courses from past 3 years)

5397 Admiralty Environmental and Insurance Claims - ENGERRAND (offered in Spring  2019)
The Deepwater Horizon blowout resulted in more than 500,000 claims and payments of more than $60 billion, and the waters of the United States see collisions, allisions, injuries, spills, and discharges every day. Admiralty Environmental and Insurance Issues teaches the civil and criminal remedies available for the environmental claims resulting from these incidents as well as the insurance issues applicable when there is a marine accident.

5297 Admiralty Environmental and Insurance Claims - ENGERRAND (offered in Summer I  2019)
The Deepwater Horizon blowout resulted in more than 500,000 claims and payments of more than $60 billion, and the waters of the United States see collisions, allisions, injuries, spills, and discharges every day. Admiralty Environmental and Insurance Issues teaches the civil and criminal remedies available for the environmental claims resulting from these incidents as well as the insurance issues applicable when there is a marine accident.

5397 Admiralty, Maritime Commerce - WINTON (offered in Fall  2019)
This course will cover the general maritime law of commerce, including: maritime jurisdiction (in rem, quasi in rem and in personam) and the interplay between state and federal jurisdiction under the Savings to Suitors Clause, maritime procedure and substantive maritime law including contracts, torts (other than personal injury & wrongful death), collisions, cargo, limitation of liability, insurance, maritime liens, tugs, towage, pilotage and salvage. Whether or not one ever anticipates practicing maritime law to any great extent, the intent is that the student will come away with a much better understanding of federal jurisdiction and its impact on litigation practice generally.

5397 Admiralty, Maritime Commerce - WINTON (offered in Fall  2018)
This course will cover the general maritime law of commerce, including: maritime jurisdiction (in rem, quasi in rem and in personam) and the interplay between state and federal jurisdiction under the Savings to Suitors Clause, maritime procedure and substantive maritime law including contracts, torts (other than personal injury & wrongful death), collisions, cargo, limitation of liability, insurance, maritime liens, tugs, towage, pilotage and salvage. Whether or not one ever anticipates practicing maritime law to any great extent, the intent is that the student will come away with a much better understanding of federal jurisdiction and its impact on litigation practice generally.

5297 Advanced Drafting for Corporate Transactions - GINSBURG (offered in Fall  2018)
The purpose of this course is to prepare students for their first year of general corporate practice, whether in an in-house, law firm, or solo practice setting, by completing a simulated financing transaction. The course will focus on how secured transactions law, bankruptcy law and corporate law influence the structuring and documenting of a typical secured bank loan. Students will work through a hypothetical transaction that be the focal point of the entire semester. The class will begin by discussing alternative capital structures and how bank loans are used to finance acquisitions, growth and working capital needs. We will then analyze and draft credit and security documents, and learn how specific contract provisions are important to both borrowers and lenders. We will analyze all stages of finance transactions, and discuss the often divergent strategies and goals of lenders and borrowers. The fundamentals of negotiating critical provisions of a leveraged finance transaction will be stressed, with emphasis on private equity investors and their finance sources. The professor will relate many of his experiences in global finance transactions and share provisions from actual loan documentation to demonstrate how those fundamentals are applied in actual transactions. Although the course will be of particular interest to those pursuing a corporate or commercial law career, the concepts are applicable to any transactional practice.

5297 Advanced Drafting for Corporate Transactions - GINSBURG (offered in Spring  2019)
The purpose of this course is to prepare students for their first year of general corporate practice, whether in an in-house, law firm, or solo practice setting, by completing a simulated financing transaction. The course will focus on how secured transactions law, bankruptcy law and corporate law influence the structuring and documenting of a typical secured bank loan. Students will work through a hypothetical transaction that be the focal point of the entire semester. The class will begin by discussing alternative capital structures and how bank loans are used to finance acquisitions, growth and working capital needs. We will then analyze and draft credit and security documents, and learn how specific contract provisions are important to both borrowers and lenders. We will analyze all stages of finance transactions, and discuss the often divergent strategies and goals of lenders and borrowers. The fundamentals of negotiating critical provisions of a leveraged finance transaction will be stressed, with emphasis on private equity investors and their finance sources. The professor will relate many of his experiences in global finance transactions and share provisions from actual loan documentation to demonstrate how those fundamentals are applied in actual transactions. Although the course will be of particular interest to those pursuing a corporate or commercial law career, the concepts are applicable to any transactional practice.

5297 Advanced Drafting for Corporate Transactions - GINSBURG (offered in Fall  2019)
The purpose of this course is to prepare students for their first year of general corporate practice, whether in an in-house, law firm, or solo practice setting, by completing a simulated financing transaction. The course will focus on how secured transactions law, bankruptcy law and corporate law influence the structuring and documenting of a typical secured bank loan. Students will work through a hypothetical transaction that be the focal point of the entire semester. The class will begin by discussing alternative capital structures and how bank loans are used to finance acquisitions, growth and working capital needs. We will then analyze and draft credit and security documents, and learn how specific contract provisions are important to both borrowers and lenders. We will analyze all stages of finance transactions, and discuss the often divergent strategies and goals of lenders and borrowers. The fundamentals of negotiating critical provisions of a leveraged finance transaction will be stressed, with emphasis on private equity investors and their finance sources. The professor will relate many of his experiences in global finance transactions and share provisions from actual loan documentation to demonstrate how those fundamentals are applied in actual transactions. Although the course will be of particular interest to those pursuing a corporate or commercial law career, the concepts are applicable to any transactional practice.

5397 Climate Intervention Law & Policy - HESTER (offered in Fall  2019)
: As efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions continue to fall short of international goals and concerns mount over worsening climate change damages, attention has begun to focus on an emerging set of technologies that seek to directly manipulate the global atmosphere or alter regional ecosystems to offset or prevent climate change itself. These efforts generally involve either carbon dioxide removal from the ambient atmosphere on a massive scale, or solar radiation management to reduce the amount of energy reaching the Earth’s surface. These climate intervention technologies raise novel and fundamental challenges for both international law and domestic regulatory policy. This class will be the first law course in the United States focusing on this new field of law.

5297 Comparative Health Law - LOPEZ De La Osa Escribano (offered in Fall  2018)
COMPARATIVE HEALTH LAW course focuses on the analysis of health foreign legal systems and topics, comparing them to the structure and notions existing in the US. The objective is to study through practical cases and legal notions and structures, a number of chosen aspects related to Health Law from an international and comparative point of view. Doing so, the target is: - To analyze the different health legal systems existing in the world and to define the interactions national healthcare legal systems can have worldwide. - To foster interest in comparative law methods in Health to bring solutions to globalize matters and inspire further legislation. Lectures will be structured in (13) thirteen in-class sessions of 108 minutes each.

5297 Comparative Health Law - LOPEZ De La Osa Escribano (offered in Spring  2017)
COMPARATIVE HEALTH LAW course focuses on the analysis of health foreign legal systems and topics, comparing them to the structure and notions existing in the US. The objective is to study through practical cases and legal notions and structures, a number of chosen aspects related to Health Law from an international and comparative point of view. Doing so, the target is: - To analyze the different health legal systems existing in the world and to define the interactions national healthcare legal systems can have worldwide. - To foster interest in comparative law methods in Health to bring solutions to globalize matters and inspire further legislation. Lectures will be structured in (14) fourteen in-class sessions of 100 minutes each.

6A97 Corporate Social Responsibility for Sustainability - ANGELIDES (offered in Spring  2017)
Selected Topics in Global Energy Development and Sustainability: Corporate Social Responsibility for Sustainability– 1.5 credits. The energy industry is diverse, complex and dynamic. It also has a significant impact on communities and many segments of the world economy and politics. The main purpose of the course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the various aspects of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the energy industry, primarily studying these concepts in upstream and midstream oil & gas sectors. By successfully completing this course, students should understand and be able to articulate the key elements, opportunities, risks, and challenges of CSR with regard to competing interests (government, corporate, society). Real world examples are used to illustrate factors that impact the profitability but do not lend themselves to be readily modeled. The question of whether a proactive approach to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) can be used to enhance profitability will be studied. Experts in their respective fields will join the class as guest speakers and share their experiences in managing some of the tougher challenges in the industry.

6397 Corporate Social Responsibility for Sustainability - ANGELIDES (offered in Fall  2017)
The energy industry is diverse, complex and dynamic. It also has a significant impact on communities and many segments of the world economy and politics. The main purpose of the course is to provide students with a basic understanding of the various aspects of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the energy industry, primarily studying these concepts in upstream and midstream oil & gas sectors. By successfully completing this course, students should understand and be able to articulate the key elements, opportunities, risks, and challenges of CSR with regard to competing interests (government, corporate, society). Real world examples are used to illustrate factors that impact the profitability but do not lend themselves to be readily modeled. The question of whether a proactive approach to Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) can be used to enhance profitability will be studied. Experts in their respective fields will join the class as guest speakers and share their experiences in managing some of the tougher challenges in the industry. .

5297 Creditor's Rights - CERSONSKY (offered in Fall  2017)
Outline

5297 Crime in The Information Age - RAMIREZ (offered in Spring  2019)
This course examines the intersection of two fields, criminal law and the law of information and intellectual property. This new area of the law has evolved to protect information products from unauthorized use that is facilitated by the internet and digitization.

5397 Criminal Defense Clinic - TAYLOR (offered in Spring  2017)
Students in the Criminal Defense Clinic will be assigned misdemeanor cases and be responsible for handling all legal aspects of the case from arraignment to fact investigation to trial. The Clinic selects misdemeanor cases with a high probability of going to trial, which increases the likelihood of each student serving as lead attorney. Students will learn the law in a real-life context and develop profession and problem-solving skills. Students will be exposed to a wide range of cases such as assaults, thefts, driving while intoxicated and drug possession. Students will have the opportunity to investigate crime scenes and interview witnesses. The clinic will consist of a classroom component and courtroom component. The classroom component will focus on case preparation, advocacy skills and ethical considerations. The courtroom component will allow students to negotiate plea agreements and sit first chair as lead counsel in a jury trial. The clinic format is also designed to allow students to explore the intersection of criminal laws and social issues while receiving one-on-one supervision from former judge and prosecutor Yvonne Taylor. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5397 Criminal Defense Clinic II - TAYLOR (offered in Spring  2017)
Students in the Criminal Defense Clinic II will be assigned advanced misdemeanor cases and be responsible for handling all legal aspects of the case from arraignment to fact investigation to trial. The Clinic selects misdemeanor cases with a high probability of going to trial, which increases the likelihood of each student serving as lead attorney. Students will learn the law in a real-life context and develop profession and problem-solving skills. Students will be exposed to a wide range of cases such as assaults, thefts, driving while intoxicated and drug possession. Students will have the opportunity to investigate crime scenes and interview witnesses. The clinic will consist of a classroom component and courtroom component. The classroom component will focus on case preparation, advocacy skills and ethical considerations. The courtroom component will allow students to negotiate plea agreements and sit first chair as lead counsel in a jury trial. The clinic format is also designed to allow students to explore the intersection of criminal laws and social issues while receiving one-on-one supervision from former judge and prosecutor Yvonne Taylor. Students must work in the Clinic 50 hours per course credit hour.

5397 Criminal Evidence - THOMPSON/BENNETT/OLVERA (offered in Spring  2019)
This experiential course provides students with an opportunity to hone their oral and written advocacy skills in the context of actual criminal felony cases. The course weaves together doctrinal instruction with exercises in pretrial and trial practice. The course covers critical legal issues that arise from the point of arrest through trial, with advocacy assignments along the way. Examples include arrest warrants, grand jury proceedings, discovery practice, suppression motions based on Fourth Amendment searches, eyewitness identification reliability, and the validity of conclusions drawn by a forensic science expert, among others. Students will be provided with three case files—a murder case, a sexual assault case, and an aggravated robbery case—on which assignments are based. The course is co-taught by experienced practitioners, one prosecutor and one public defender, along with a full-time doctrinal professor. Students will play the roles of prosecutors for half of the assignments and of defense attorneys for the other half. The course also addresses legal ethics issues in criminal practice. This course is intended for students who have some interest in practicing criminal law after graduation.

5397 Criminal Litigation and Legal Issues in Criminal Procedure - MURPHY/PARRAS/LOWERY (offered in Spring  2019)
Criminal Litigation and Legal Issues in Criminal Procedure is designed to incorporate the substantive law of criminal procedure into a trial advocacy course. The course will cover virtually all of the stages of a criminal case—from the probable cause hearing through the sentencing hearing and hearing on a motion for a new trial. Most of the issues addressed in this course implicate federal constitutional law principles applicable to all criminal prosecutions, whether they occur in state or federal court. Each class will include a brief lecture about the relevant substantive law applicable to the particular stage at issue. The remainder of each class will be oral advocacy exercises involving factual hypotheticals implicating the relevant substantive law principles. The exercises will require each student to play the role of either defense counsel or prosecutor. The hypotheticals will involve fully developed factual scenarios. No additional factual development will be required. Most of the oral advocacy exercises will involve legal arguments to a trial court (a role played by the instructor). On two occasions—voir dire and closing arguments—students will advocate to a jury (played by fellow students). The two types of legal advocacy—one to a judge, the other to a lay jury—involve different approaches, which will be addressed during the course. In this course, students will be assigned their factual hypotheticals and role-playing assignments one week in advance of each class. In addition to the hypotheticals, students should read the assigned materials for each class and prepare oral presentations. No additional legal research is necessary. In fact, to assure that both sides’ arguments are premised on a discrete body of law, students should not engage in additional research. Every student will make a short oral presentation each week with the exception of the first class. Depending on the number of students in the course, each student’s presentation will be approximately five to ten minutes in length. The instructor— and occasionally fellow students—will play the role of trial judge during exercises. The instructor and fellow students will critique each student after his or her presentation. As this course progresses, and students get more practice, it is hoped that each student’s comfort level and proficiency in legal speech and debate skills will improve. In 14 weeks, the class will cover preliminary hearings, bail hearings, pretrial motions, voir dire, legal objections during trial, motions for judgment of acquittal, jury instructions, closing arguments, sentencing hearings, and various post convictions challenges.

5397 Criminal Litigation and Legal Issues in Criminal Procedure - MURPHY/MURPHY/PARRAS/LOWERY (offered in Fall  2018)
Criminal Litigation Practice is designed to incorporate the substantive law of criminal procedure into a trial advocacy course. The course will cover virtually all of the stages of a criminal case—from the probable cause hearing through the sentencing hearing and hearing on a motion for a new trial. Most of the issues addressed in this course implicate federal constitutional law principles applicable to all criminal prosecutions, whether they occur in state or federal court.

5397 Criminal Litigation and Legal Issues in Criminal Procedure - MURPHY/MURPHY/PARRAS/LOWERY (offered in Fall  2019)
Criminal Litigation Practice is designed to incorporate the substantive law of criminal procedure into a trial advocacy course. The course will cover virtually all of the stages of a criminal case—from the probable cause hearing through the sentencing hearing and hearing on a motion for a new trial. Most of the issues addressed in this course implicate federal constitutional law principles applicable to all criminal prosecutions, whether they occur in state or federal court.

5297 Crimmigration - HOFFMANG (offered in Spring  2019)
This course will introduce students to the many issues at the intersection of immigration law and criminal law. Crimmigration is a complex and dynamic area of law. The course will provide students with the knowledge required to recognize and analyze the potential immigration consequences of a variety of criminal pleas and convictions.

5297 Data Protection in Corporate Practice - BENDER (offered in Fall  2018)
This introductory course will cover the basic principles of data protection and privacy law as applied to the conduct of corporations. It will examine the policies underlying this still-nascent form of protection, and will focus on corporate compliance in most or all of the following areas: cybersecurity, trade secrets, data protection in education, state privacy laws, employment privacy, health privacy, the fair credit reporting act, financial data protection, online behavioral privacy, and international data protection law. There are no prerequisites for this course.

5397 Diplomacy for Oil and Gas - CARDENAS (offered in Spring  2017)
This course features the crossroads between geopolitics and the law of the oil and gas industry. From Houston, a world capital of energy diplomacy, we will study the legal instruments that have been built to govern inter-state and state-corporate relations in the oil industry, providing to the students political and economy background for investment strategies of the oil industry. Readings for this course will be focused on international treaties and public international law applicable to the oil and gas industry. We will also study selected chapters on energy geopolitics such as: 1)The Energy World is Flat by Daniel Lacalle and Diego Parrilla 2)The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World by Daniel Yergin 3)The End of Power by Moises Naim 4)Crude Volatility: The History and the Future of Boom-Bust Oil Prices by Robert McNally"

5297 Education Law: K-12 - DAVIS/BRUSH (offered in SummerMini  2019)
This course surveys the law affecting K-12 public school districts, including Public Information and Records Management, Open Meetings Act, Special Education/504, Competitive Purchasing, State and Federal Liability and Immunities, First Amendment Issues, Fourteenth Amendment Issues, Teacher Contracts, and Student Discipline/Harassment/Bullying.

5297 Eminent Domain and Private Property Rights - HODGE/MAYFIELD (offered in Fall  2017)
Texas is home to eight of the nation’s 15 fastest-growing cities and boasts five of the top 10 cities in the total number of new residents. This growth is not a new phenomenon. Texas has added more residents than any other state since 2000. But what happens when the infrastructure growth associated with the Texas population boom impacts private property owners? An inherent tension exists between public projects needed to accommodate Texas’s expansive growth and fundamental property rights protected by the U.S. and Texas Constitutions. Eminent domain—the power of a governmental entity (or those with its delegated authority) to take private property and convert it into public use for just compensation—is designed to balance public and private property interests. Class discussions and reading assignments will explore whether the current eminent domain framework protects property owners and the public. The subject is generally divided into two interrelated parts: (1) the origins of eminent domain, public use, and public necessity; and (2) “just” compensation (including evidentiary and procedural issues that impact value).

5397 Energy Law & Policy - WARREN (offered in Spring  2017)
This course provides an introduction to U.S. energy law and policy. It looks at how energy sources (water, wind, sun, coal, oil, gas, nuclear) are extracted, transported, and converted into energy as well as the physical, market, and legal structures governing each energy source. It introduces the key jurisdictional actors that play differing roles in energy controversies and provides students with an understanding of pervasive multi-jurisdictional approach to energy regulation. Finally, it explores current hot topics in energy law and policy and opens a dialog to analyze how those topics are interrelated to other topics such as business and economics, climate and environment, human rights, and energy security. This is a project course, no final examination.

5397 Entertainment Law - ALONSO/BARKS (offered in Spring  2019)
The course will focus on the constitutional, statutory, and common law framework of entertainment law and its practical implications for practitioners. With the Constitution as our base camp, we will explore the fusion of laws that govern the world of entertainment, including copyrights, trademarks, contracts, and tort law. We will then analyze their impact on the business and legal affairs of recording artists, record companies, publishers, radio and TV broadcasting, and the motion picture industry. The goal will be not only to provide you with a comprehensive insight into this unique field but also prepare you to advise clients with entertainment law related issues, whether they will be in transactions or litigation. Your Grade: Your course grade will be determined by a closed-book final exam with short answer questions, longer answer questions, true/false questions which ask you to explain your answer, and multiple choice questions. The exam will count for 90% of your grade. The other 10% of your grade will be based on class participation, so come prepared to take part in class with the skill and eloquence of Vincent Gambini. While I will enforce attendance to the extent required by the school, your failure to attend and participate will be your loss. Since the course will not require a paper or homework assignments, the reading assignments will be non-wimpy. The class Web Board, which includes past exams and student answers, will give you an idea of what the course will cover.

5397 Entertainment Law - ALONSO/BARKS (offered in Spring  2018)
The course will focus on the constitutional, statutory, and common law framework of entertainment law and its practical implications for practitioners. With the Constitution as our base camp, we will explore the fusion of laws that govern the world of entertainment, including copyrights, trademarks, contracts, and tort law. We will then analyze their impact on the business and legal affairs of recording artists, record companies, publishers, radio and TV broadcasting, and the motion picture industry. The goal will be not only to provide you with a comprehensive insight into this unique field but also prepare you to advise clients with entertainment law related issues, whether they will be in transactions or litigation. Your Grade: Your course grade will be determined by a closed-book final exam with short answer questions, longer answer questions, true/false questions which ask you to explain your answer, and multiple choice questions. The exam will count for 90% of your grade. The other 10% of your grade will be based on class participation, so come prepared to take part in class with the skill and eloquence of Vincent Gambini. While I will enforce attendance to the extent required by the school, your failure to attend and participate will be your loss. Since the course will not require a paper or homework assignments, the reading assignments will be non-wimpy. The class Web Board, which includes past exams and student answers, will give you an idea of what the course will cover.

5197 Environment, Energy & Natural Resources Research - BADEAUX (offered in Fall  2018)
This is a practical class, focused on finding the law and legal authorities relevant to taking and defending actions concerning the environment, energy, and natural resources. There are weekly assignments, a midterm research project and a final research project.

6A97 Environmental Impacts and Policies - KLIEMAN/THERIOT (offered in Spring  2017)
2. GEDS 6A97: Selected Topics in Global Energy Development and Sustainability:Environmental Impacts and Policies– 1.5 credits. This course is designed to inform students of the complex environmental issues, past and present, and environmental impacts associated with historical and current oil and gas development in the US and abroad. Through case studies, students will learn how companies, local communities, and government entities have dealt with various environmental challenges. Each session will focus on one or more key knowledge sets that will help to equip students with analytical tools for future work within the energy sector in different regions. These knowledge sets are geared toward informing the decision making process for mitigating potential environmental, regulatory, and legal problems, and for planning sustainable project development such as: Environmental Impacts; Environmental Regulations: Industry led versus government led; Responses to environmental crises and; Provide a road map based on lessons learned.

5397 Environmental Law in Oil & Gas - HESTER (offered in Fall  2017)
Even with petroleum and natural gas' enormous importance to our modern economy and lifestyle, hydrocarbon development and use remain tightly intertwined with environmental law and liabilities. For every inspiring engineering marvel in oil field development, hydraulic fracturing, and deep sea drilling, a counterbalancing memory arises of the oil-slicked shores of the Gulf Coast, the catastrophe of the Exxon Valdez, and growing fears over climate change caused by fossil fuel development and use. Simply put, a lawyer advising oil and gas interests (or opposing them) simply cannot provide reliable legal advice without an understanding of the environmental limits and liabilities accompanying hydrocarbon development. This course will explore environmental issues in the oil and gas industry from various perspectives, including the following: 1. the landowners directly impacted by oil-field contamination; 2. the oil and gas companies; 3. the regulatory agencies and legislatures charged with protecting the environment and the general public; and 4. non-governmental organizations who work for protection of the environment. This class is not an advanced course, and you do not need to have taken Environmental Law or Oil & Gas Law (although some educational or practical background can be useful). We will not review environmental laws in detail, but will instead seek to understand the environmental issues and practices that affect (or are caused by) the oil and gas industry. Our focus is on practice, real-world application of these legal principles and strategies that you can use to represent stakeholders. We will also examine techniques used to create, comply and enforce environmental laws and regulatory requirements. One of this class' main goals is to improve your ability to be a valued and effective team member of your current or future environmental clients. Some of those clients may be your friends and family that have environmental issues with one or more of the millions of oil and gas wells drilling in the United States. We will focus on U.S. environmental laws as a result, but we may digress in class discussions to the development of environmental law in other oil and gas producing countries.

5397 Environmental Markets - FLATT (offered in Spring  2019)
This class will explore the evolving markets in environmental amenities, particularly using carbon trading as an example, and how this relates to skills in practice.

5397 ERISA - FELTON (offered in Fall  2017)
Employee benefits law is ever-changing and of late has been a priority for law makers, including our presidential administrations. This 3-hour course provides a basic overview of the specialized employee benefit plans (such as 401(k) plans and welfare benefit plans) governed by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (“ERISA”), the federal law governing these benefit plans in general. Students will gain a historical perspective of ERISA’s origins to learn how the need for federal action came about. Students will also learn the qualification requirements of the tax code applicable to employee retirement plans, from both the employer and employee perspective. The goal of the course is to convey a practical understanding of how ERISA impacts a wide variety of practice areas. Such an understanding is likely to prove attractive to a wide variety of prospective employers: big law firms, family law firms, insurance companies, banks, in-house counsel, and more!

5397 Family Immigration Law - BECK (offered in Spring  2017)
Utilizing federal statutes, regulations, case law, the Visa Bulletin, the U.S. Dept. of State Foreign Affairs Manual as well as federal agency memoranda, students will work individually and in groups to find legal solutions to hypothetical situations that involve the immigration of families to the U.S. Students will develop practical skills that will enable them to successfully represent clients who are seeking immigration benefits through a family member in the U.S. or abroad. The class will be a combination of lecture and in-class exercises.

5397 Family Law Advocacy - FARR (offered in Spring  2017)
Overview of Family Law case from initial interview through trial and closing documents. Overview of Texas Family Code how to generally navigate it and common problem statutes to know for practice. For more information please see the syllabus.

5297 Family Law Advocacy - FARR (offered in Spring  2018)
Overview of Family Law case from initial interview through trial and closing documents. Overview of Texas Family Code how to generally navigate it and common problem statutes to know for practice. For more information please see the syllabus.

5297 Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers - BRENNAN (offered in Spring  2017)
Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers is a graduate level course that will cover the area of introductory financial reporting and analysis. Included in the course will be introduction to the mechanics of financial accounting, the building of financial statements, reporting and analysis of financial information and in depth study of accounting principles and procedures. Certain business and financial practices are also covered. The reporting of the financial and operating results of the business entity through the financial statements is a major objective of any company or organization. By the end of this course you will know the reporting requirements of public companies, how the information in the financial statements is used and analyzed and how the information is accounted for and derived in the form of financial statements. You will also know how to read financial statements as a decision maker in evaluating companies and how lawyers must use this information in their practices. There will be four class meetings over spring break: Class Days: Monday, March 13, 2017 to Thursday March 16, 2017. Each class will run from 9:00 am – 4:00 pm. 1 Hour lunch and 10 minute breaks daily. Lunch will be provided.

5297 Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers - BRENNAN (offered in Spring  2018)
Financial Statement Analysis and Business Practices for Lawyers is a graduate level course that will cover the area of introductory financial reporting and analysis. Included in the course will be introduction to the mechanics of financial accounting, the building of financial statements, reporting and analysis of financial information and in depth study of accounting principles and procedures. Certain business and financial practices are also covered. The reporting of the financial and operating results of the business entity through the financial statements is a major objective of any company or organization. By the end of this course you will know the reporting requirements of public companies, how the information in the financial statements is used and analyzed and how the information is accounted for and derived in the form of financial statements. You will also know how to read financial statements as a decision maker in evaluating companies and how lawyers must use this information in their practices.

5297 Food, Agriculture, and the Environment - MORATH (offered in SummerMini  2018)
This course offers an overview of the historical, legal, and policy framework for food and agriculture in the United States. Agricultural and food laws and regulations play a vital role in determining health outcomes for our nation and the level of environmental impact to shared natural resources such as air, water, soil, and biodiversity. The course discusses federal environmental statutes in the context of food and agricultural production and provides an introduction to the U.S. Farm Bill, pesticides, farmed animal welfare, genetically modified foods, food access, food safety, and labeling schemes.

5397 Global Service and Procurement Agreements in Oil & Gas Sector - CARDENAS/MITRO (offered in Fall  2018)
The activities in the upstream sector are funded by international oil companies but the work is carried out primarily by oil field contractors. Selecting the right contractors and designing and managing appropriate contractual relationships is one of the most important functions in an oil company. From both the operator and the contractor perspective the contracts must be realistic and clearly spell out roles and expected rewards and performance. Yet expectations are changing dramatically as petroleum activities must take into account the requirements of host governments, local communities and international standards in addition to company shareholder demands. Once the host government contract and the joint operating agreement are signed, how contractors would manage the compliance with obligations through service and procurement contracts? This course will provide an overview of the oil company/contractor relationships, typical contracts terms, financial implications, project finance, best practices, as well as the new trends development by integrated service contracts, to help drive sustainable results that benefit all stakeholders.

5397 Guardian Ad Litem I - DOW,KATYA/FISHER (offered in Spring  2018)
Dual-status youth (also often referred to as Crossover Youth) are juveniles who are involved in both the Juvenile Justice system as well as the child welfare system. Absent appropriate and targeted interventions, these youth are at increased risk for mental health concerns, educational problems, occupational difficulties, and public health and safety issues. In the existing system, these children and young adults often fall through the cracks. The principal Overview of Guardian Ad Litem Representation for Dual-Status Youth: objective of the JCAP guardians ad litem (GAL) class is to train law students so they are able to advocate for the special needs of these juveniles who are in contact with two different legal systems.

5397 Hazardous Waste Law - SHERMAN (offered in Fall  2019)
Examination of the primary features of the federal Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste regulatory program and the Comprehensive Environmental Response , Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) and significant jurisprudence associated with each; limited examination of State of Texas authorized RCRA program and State CERCLA equivalent.

5197 Health Law Research - LAWSON (offered in Spring  2017)
This is a specialized course on health law research. It will focus on federal and state primary legal materials related to health law, including relevant statutes, regulations, agency guidance and decisions, and case law. Secondary sources such as treatises and practice guides specific to health law will also be discussed.

5297 Health Legislation & Advocacy - SMITH,E/VANE (offered in Fall  2018)
This course will focus on the health care policy and both the legislative and administrative processes to successfully pass or implement a new law or policy. This includes the development process of a policy position, researching and drafting a policy proposal on behalf of a non-profit community partner or similar organization, potentially several throughout the course. Students will learn the skills to determine the best method to advance the law or policy proposal, whether through legislation or rulemaking. Students will testify or meet with current Texas legislators and staff, and several guest speakers will join the course to provide real world perspective.

5297 Health Legislation & Advocacy II - GRAY/WINNIKE (offered in Spring  2017)
This course is the second part of a two-semester course. The spring semester will focus on monitoring and participating in health legislation before the Texas 85th Legislature Regular Session. Students will monitor and provide support for the policy proposal developed in the fall semester course, track and report on other health legislation, and follow the actions of health-related committees. Grading will be based on several practical writing assignments (including drafting committee testimony, amendment language, community education article, legislative sponsor’s talking points, committee business tracking, and a health legislative summary). This course satisfies the Skills Course Requirement. Prerequisite: Health Legislation & Advocacy I.

5397 Health Transactions - MANTEL/McSTAY/SHEA (offered in Spring  2019)
In this advanced health law course students learn and apply substantive laws and lawyering skills to model health care transactions. Working in teams of associates under the supervision of the professors, including practicing health care attorneys, students will engage in health care contract drafting, client interviews, negotiations, due diligence, and regulatory analysis. The model health care transactions are based on deals commonly entered into by hospitals and health systems, including hospital-physician employment agreements, health care joint ventures, and acquisitions.

5297 Healthcare Compliance - KINZEL (offered in Fall  2017)
This course will examine health care compliance programs and the laws, regulations, and federal guidance attendant thereto, including OIG rules and federal agency enforcement actions. This course will explore ethical considerations of building effective compliance programs, including state law implications. This course will explore how to handle both internal and external investigations, including whistle-blower actions. This course will focus on the practical implications of laws that apply to health care organizations, and how organizations help ensure adherence to relevant rules through effective compliance programs.

5297 HIPAA - EWER (offered in Fall  2017)
Health Information Privacy Rule: Fall 2016; University of Houston Law Center. Professor: Michael S. Ewer, MD, JD, LLM Course number: 5297 Time and place: Tuesdays, 4:00-6:00 PM(room not assigned yet) Professor contact: mewer@mdanderson.org This course is designed to help you understand the HIPAA Privacy Rule, and will look at the requirements of covered entities, business associates, and subcontractors. The course will start with an overview of HIPAA, and achieve an understanding of who is and who is not a covered entity, what constitutes protected health information, and how protected health information can and cannot be used or disclosed within the HIPAA rule. The course will look beyond individual rights to public policy exceptions within the rule, and will look at when protected health information may be used or disclosed without specific permission, when oral permission is sufficient, and when written disclosure is required. Limitations to disclosure for marketing and fundraising purposes will be discussed, as will specific requirements for psychotherapy notes. Notification requirements with regard to breaches and complaints as well as other administrative requirements will also be discussed. The course will consist of 15 sections; some but not all may be covered in a single session. 1) Introduction, overview, and covered entities 2) Protected health information 3) Uses and disclosures for treatment, payment, or operations 4) Uses and disclosures allowed under public policy 5) Disclosures for which oral permission is allowed 6) Uses and disclosures for which written authorization is required 7) Special considerations for disclosures of heightened protections 8) Uses and disclosures related to fundraising 9) Special considerations for research disclosures not requiring authorization 10) Business Associates and Business associate agreements 11) Miscellaneous issues 12) Individual rights 13) Compliance and enforcement 14) Organizational issues 15) Preemption The course will use handout material and linked references; students will be required to prepare the assigned readings. A number of relevant cases will be discussed as time permits. A midterm written examination will be given, and we will discuss on the first day of class whether or not that should count toward the final grade, but it will serve to help students prepare the material to be learned in this class. There will be a two-hour written final examination that will have both multiple choice questions and an essay. Class participation and level of preparation may be counted toward the final grade. Attendance is required as per University of Houston standards. Attendance will be recorded. The use of personal computers is restricted to activity related to this class; no games, social networking, or eBay, please. Office hours are before each of the class sessions in the Health Law and Policy Institute, or by arrangement.

5497 Hot Topics in FDA Law - EVANS (offered in Spring  2018)
This course provides a practice-oriented basic survey of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, a surprisingly comprehensive federal consumer safety framework that regulates not just medical products but microwave ovens, computer screens, nanoparticles in make-up, genetically modified foods, dietary supplements and a dizzying array of other products that together account for 1 in 4 dollars spent in the U.S. economy. The course then takes a deeper look at current controversies such as FDA’s ability to block dying patients’ access to unapproved therapies; FDA’s oversight of gene editing technologies that may move into human clinical trials as early as 2017; concerns about the safety of commonly used cosmetics; FDA’s recurring collisions with the First Amendment; white collar crime in drug marketing; and other controversies yet to emerge. No prerequisites or scientific background required. This course is suitable for any student who may work in, or represent, consumer products manufacturers in the future.

5397 Human Resources: Advanced Issues in Employment Law - SULENTIC (offered in Spring  2017)
This course will familiarize students with the legal issues involved in the management of human resources in the modern workplace. Topics will include (i) drafting and negotiation of individual employment agreements, (ii) drafting and implementation of benefits and compensation policies, (iii) drafting and interpretation of employee communications, including employee handbooks, (iv) labor and employment issues in corporate transactions, (v) workplace investigations and internal resolution of problems in the workplace, and (vi) global employment challenges for multinational corporations. Students will propose and analyze solutions to problems discussed in class and will prepare and submit drafts of documents or portions of documents relevant to the resolution of these problems. Grades will be based on written assignments due throughout the semester.

5397 Immigration and Family Law - HEPPARD/VEGA (offered in Spring  2019)
In this class, students will work individually and in groups to find legal solutions to hypothetical situations where immigration and family law intersect e.g. marriage, divorce, adoption, domestic violence, the Hague Convention and Suits Affecting the Parent Child Relationship. Students will study family-based immigration law and learn how it relates to representation of individuals in family court. They will develop practical skills that will enable them to successfully represent clients who are seeking immigration benefits through a family member. Students will learn the practical aspects of representation of non-citizens in family court.

5397 Intellectual Property Survey - MICHAELS (offered in Fall  2019)
This course covers domestic intellectual property laws - patent, copyright, trademark, and trade secret - through statues and cases. It is designed to afford the student who intends to practice in other areas an acquaintance with key IP issues, principles and doctrine, and to provide the intellectual property and information law specialist an introduction to the overall subject. The course will provide roughly equal treatment of patent, copyright and trademark law, approximately four weeks for each, with the remainder applied to the law of trade secrets, introduction, and/or review.

5397 International Arbitration Advocacy - ROBERTSON/CARSON/HARRELL (offered in Fall  2017)
International arbitration is a growing field and increasingly is the mechanism by which the largest international commercial disputes are resolved. This course has two primary aims: (1) to expose students to international arbitration practice; and (2) to provide students with the skills they need to represent clients effectively in international commercial arbitrations. The backbone of the course will be a mock arbitration with the students advocating the entire matter through each stage of the arbitration process.

5297 International Contracting - BAKAS (offered in Spring  2019)
The course “International contracting” is a simulation course. It presents a background of the law governing international contracting and offers insight in the role of an international corporate lawyer. Students will learn about the free-trade theory, international organizations and sources of the law of international trade with a focus on sale of goods. Apart from lectures on the various topics, students will negotiate in teams hypothetical international business cases considering commercial and legal issues while representing one of the parties. Cultural differences also play an important role in international contracting which will be addressed as well.

5297 International Corporate Compliance - McCONNELL/BAKER/BUSTAMANTE (offered in Spring  2017)
Corporate compliance, one of the fastest growing markets for legal services, addresses the problems of organizations struggling to manage risk ranging from corruption to data privacy. This class will teach you the process involved in addressing compliance risk and how to integrate compliance processes into a business. We will discuss a number of substantive compliance areas, but the goal of the class is to teach you how to develop a risk based approach to solve compliance problems. You may not bring a laptop or use any other electronic device during this class.

5397 International Energy Law - WARREN (offered in Spring  2017)
This course provides an introduction to how international law regulates or impacts energy activities. It analyzes the legal framework for trade and investment in the energy sector, as well as rules governing energy development, the climate, and the environment. This course will also provide an overview of corporate responsibility and human rights consequences of energy activities. We will focus on how public and private international law consider the various actors, socio-economic interests, and environmental concerns associated with the exploitation of energy sources and how domestic law can impact those interests and concerns. By the end of the semester, you will be able to critically assess the key legal issues around the exploitation of energy sources from a multidisciplinary and global standpoint.

5297 International Intellectual Property - COLMENTER (offered in Spring  2017)
This course examines, analyzes and studies the remarkable subject of International Intellectual Property Law and how to enforce trademarks, patents and copyrights beyond national boundaries. Special emphasis will be placed on international standards for intellectual property and its implementation, application and practices in national jurisdictions. In addition the course covers the differences and similarities between the diverse national intellectual property systems. The course will be divided into six major blocks: a. Overview and Introductory Themes. b. International Copyright and Neighboring Rights. c. International Patent Law. d. International Trademarks and Geographical Indications. e. Unfair Competition and Trade Secrets. f. International Enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights.

5297 International Patent & Copyright Law and Human Rights - OKEDIJI (offered in Spring  2017)
This course will examine the international framework for the protection of patent and copyright law. We will examine key provisions of multilateral and plurilateral IP treaties, focusing on minimum standards for patent and copyright protection, national implementation of treaty provisions, and cross-border enforcement strategies. A significant amount of time will be devoted to the WTO Agreement on Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS Agreement) and its interface with international human rights norms. Using case studies, students will explore the political economy of international IP relations with a particular emphasis on institutional arrangements affecting access to medicines and access to knowledge in light of the human right to health, culture and development. Important topics include IP and pharmaceutical drug development, IP and public health, compulsory licenses, patents on life and research tools, and access to food.

5297 Internet Law - RAIMER (offered in Fall  2018)
This course covers a survey of legal issues arising from the rapid growth of the internet and other on-line communications. The focus will be on the protection and enforcement of intellectual property rights on the Internet, including copyrights, trademarks, patents, and trade secrets. The course will also include discussion on jurisdictional issues, data privacy, and computer crime.

5297 Juvenile Record Sealing I - DOW, KATYA (offered in Spring  2017)
Although a juvenile’s criminal record is generally considered to be automatically withheld from public access, such records, if not formally sealed or restricted, can be accessed by any person, agency, or institution having a “legitimate interest” in the matter. Access to juvenile records can create major barriers for the affected juveniles with respect to their efforts to obtain: (1) employment (2) financial aid, (3) housing, (4) public benefits, (5) educational and licensing opportunities, (5) military enlistment, and (6) many other benefits. Consequently, the existence of these records can make it difficult for persons with a juvenile record to get past youthful mistakes and improve their lives. This course will train law students in the procedure and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code/ Title 3. Juvenile Justice Code. In addition, students will learn applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. Finally, students will take the steps required to seal records of juveniles who are eligible for assistance. Students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible for sealing (as well as with their parent(s) or guardian(s) when appropriate or required), notify the appropriate state agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow.

5297 Juvenile Record Sealing I - DOW, KATYA (offered in Summer I  2017)
Although a juvenile’s criminal record is generally considered to be automatically withheld from public access, such records, if not formally sealed or restricted, can be accessed by any person, agency, or institution having a “legitimate interest” in the matter. Access to juvenile records can create major barriers for the affected juveniles with respect to their efforts to obtain: (1) employment (2) financial aid, (3) housing, (4) public benefits, (5) educational and licensing opportunities, (5) military enlistment, and (6) many other benefits. Consequently, the existence of these records can make it difficult for persons with a juvenile record to get past youthful mistakes and improve their lives. This course will train law students in the procedure and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code/ Title 3. Juvenile Justice Code. In addition, students will learn applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. Finally, students will take the steps required to seal records of juveniles who are eligible for assistance. Students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible for sealing (as well as with their parent(s) or guardian(s) when appropriate or required), notify the appropriate state agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow.

5197 Juvenile Record Sealing II - DOW, KATYA (offered in Summer I  2017)
This course is a continuation of Juvenile Record Sealing I; students must have satisfactorily completed JRS I to enroll. In this class, students will continue to develop and refine the skills learned in JRS I. Specifically, under the supervision of Professor Dow, students will (i) acquire expertise in the procedures and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code, and (ii) become able to apply the applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. To accomplish these goals, students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible (as well as their parent(s) or guardian(s); notify the appropriate agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow. Students in JRS II will be given more advanced cases and be given more independence when negotiating cases with the district attorneys and speaking at hearings. Finally, students in JRS II may be paired with students from JRS I to assist them on initial cases.

5197 Juvenile Record Sealing II - DOW, KATYA (offered in Spring  2017)
This course is a continuation of Juvenile Record Sealing I; students must have satisfactorily completed JRS I to enroll. In this class, students will continue to develop and refine the skills learned in JRS I. Specifically, under the supervision of Professor Dow, students will (i) acquire expertise in the procedures and preparation of required forms for sealing of juvenile records pursuant to Section 58.003 of the Family Code, and (ii) become able to apply the applicable law to identify which juveniles are eligible for sealing. To accomplish these goals, students will be expected to meet with juveniles who are eligible (as well as their parent(s) or guardian(s); notify the appropriate agencies; and attend the sealing hearing with Professor Dow. Students in JRS II will be given more advanced cases and be given more independence when negotiating cases with the district attorneys and speaking at hearings. Finally, students in JRS II may be paired with students from JRS I to assist them on initial cases.

5297 Juvenile Representation - DOW,KATYA/FISHER (offered in Fall  2018)
Dual-status youth (also often referred to as Crossover Youth) are juveniles who are involved in both the Juvenile Justice system as well as the child welfare system. Students will be trained to represent and advocate for juveniles who are in contact with two different legal systems. Students will be assigned to delinquency cases for dual-status youth and will be responsible for handling all legal aspects of the delinquency case under the supervision of the supervising attorney. Students will learn the law in a real-life context and develop professional and problem-solving skills. Students will be exposed to a wide range of cases, from misdemeanors to felonies. Students will have the opportunity to investigate cases, interview witnesses and prepare cases for trial. Students will also learn about the CPS system and factors in this system that impact the delinquency cases and the youth that are facing charges. The clinic will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. The classroom component will focus on case preparation, negotiating the CPS system, advocacy skills and ethical considerations. The practical component will allow students to handle different aspects of real cases including appearing in court, negotiating plea agreements and preparing cases for trial.

5297 Juvenile Representation - DOW,KATYA/FISHER (offered in Summer I  2018)
Dual-status youth (also often referred to as Crossover Youth) are juveniles who are involved in both the Juvenile Justice system as well as the child welfare system. Students will be trained to represent and advocate for juveniles who are in contact with two different legal systems. Students will be assigned to delinquency cases for dual-status youth and will be responsible for handling all legal aspects of the delinquency case under the supervision of the supervising attorney. Students will learn the law in a real-life context and develop professional and problem-solving skills. Students will be exposed to a wide range of cases, from misdemeanors to felonies. Students will have the opportunity to investigate cases, interview witnesses and prepare cases for trial. Students will also learn about the CPS system and factors in this system that impact the delinquency cases and the youth that are facing charges. The clinic will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. The classroom component will focus on case preparation, negotiating the CPS system, advocacy skills and ethical considerations. The practical component will allow students to handle different aspects of real cases including appearing in court, negotiating plea agreements and preparing cases for trial.

5297 Juvenile Representation - FISHER, DOW, KATYA (offered in Spring  2019)
Dual-status youth (also often referred to as Crossover Youth) are juveniles who are involved in both the Juvenile Justice system as well as the child welfare system. Students will be trained to represent and advocate for juveniles who are in contact with two different legal systems. Students will be assigned to delinquency cases for dual-status youth and will be responsible for handling all legal aspects of the delinquency case under the supervision of the supervising attorney. Students will learn the law in a real-life context and develop professional and problem-solving skills. Students will be exposed to a wide range of cases, from misdemeanors to felonies. Students will have the opportunity to investigate cases, interview witnesses and prepare cases for trial. Students will also learn about the CPS system and factors in this system that impact the delinquency cases and the youth that are facing charges. The clinic will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. The classroom component will focus on case preparation, negotiating the CPS system, advocacy skills and ethical considerations. The practical component will allow students to handle different aspects of real cases including appearing in court, negotiating plea agreements and preparing cases for trial.

5297 Juvenile Representation - FISHER, DOW, KATYA (offered in Summer I  2019)
Dual-status youth (also often referred to as Crossover Youth) are juveniles who are involved in both the Juvenile Justice system as well as the child welfare system. Students will be trained to represent and advocate for juveniles who are in contact with two different legal systems. Students will be assigned to delinquency cases for dual-status youth and will be responsible for handling all legal aspects of the delinquency case under the supervision of the supervising attorney. Students will learn the law in a real-life context and develop professional and problem-solving skills. Students will be exposed to a wide range of cases, from misdemeanors to felonies. Students will have the opportunity to investigate cases, interview witnesses and prepare cases for trial. Students will also learn about the CPS system and factors in this system that impact the delinquency cases and the youth that are facing charges. The clinic will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. The classroom component will focus on case preparation, negotiating the CPS system, advocacy skills and ethical considerations. The practical component will allow students to handle different aspects of real cases including appearing in court, negotiating plea agreements and preparing cases for trial.

5297 Juvenile Representation - FISHER, DOW, KATYA (offered in Fall  2019)
Dual-status youth (also often referred to as Crossover Youth) are juveniles who are involved in both the Juvenile Justice system as well as the child welfare system. Students will be trained to represent and advocate for juveniles who are in contact with two different legal systems. Students will be assigned to delinquency cases for dual-status youth and will be responsible for handling all legal aspects of the delinquency case under the supervision of the supervising attorney. Students will learn the law in a real-life context and develop professional and problem-solving skills. Students will be exposed to a wide range of cases, from misdemeanors to felonies. Students will have the opportunity to investigate cases, interview witnesses and prepare cases for trial. Students will also learn about the CPS system and factors in this system that impact the delinquency cases and the youth that are facing charges. The clinic will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. The classroom component will focus on case preparation, negotiating the CPS system, advocacy skills and ethical considerations. The practical component will allow students to handle different aspects of real cases including appearing in court, negotiating plea agreements and preparing cases for trial.

5297 Juvenile Representation II - FISHER,DOW, KATYA (offered in Summer I  2019)
Dual-status youth (also often referred to as Crossover Youth) are juveniles who are involved in both the Juvenile Justice system as well as the child welfare system. Students will be trained to represent and advocate for juveniles who are in contact with two different legal systems. Students will be assigned to delinquency cases for dual-status youth and will be responsible for handling all legal aspects of the delinquency case under the supervision of the supervising attorney. Students will learn the law in a real-life context and develop professional and problem-solving skills. Students will be exposed to a wide range of cases, from misdemeanors to felonies. Students will have the opportunity to investigate cases, interview witnesses and prepare cases for trial. Students will also learn about the CPS system and factors in this system that impact the delinquency cases and the youth that are facing charges. The clinic will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. The classroom component will focus on case preparation, negotiating the CPS system, advocacy skills and ethical considerations. The practical component will allow students to handle different aspects of real cases including appearing in court, negotiating plea agreements and preparing cases for trial.

5297 Juvenile Representation II - FISHER,DOW, KATYA (offered in Fall  2019)
Dual-status youth (also often referred to as Crossover Youth) are juveniles who are involved in both the Juvenile Justice system as well as the child welfare system. Students will be trained to represent and advocate for juveniles who are in contact with two different legal systems. Students will be assigned to delinquency cases for dual-status youth and will be responsible for handling all legal aspects of the delinquency case under the supervision of the supervising attorney. Students will learn the law in a real-life context and develop professional and problem-solving skills. Students will be exposed to a wide range of cases, from misdemeanors to felonies. Students will have the opportunity to investigate cases, interview witnesses and prepare cases for trial. Students will also learn about the CPS system and factors in this system that impact the delinquency cases and the youth that are facing charges. The clinic will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. The classroom component will focus on case preparation, negotiating the CPS system, advocacy skills and ethical considerations. The practical component will allow students to handle different aspects of real cases including appearing in court, negotiating plea agreements and preparing cases for trial.

5297 Juvenile Representation II - FISHER,DOW, KATYA (offered in Spring  2019)
Dual-status youth (also often referred to as Crossover Youth) are juveniles who are involved in both the Juvenile Justice system as well as the child welfare system. Students will be trained to represent and advocate for juveniles who are in contact with two different legal systems. Students will be assigned to delinquency cases for dual-status youth and will be responsible for handling all legal aspects of the delinquency case under the supervision of the supervising attorney. Students will learn the law in a real-life context and develop professional and problem-solving skills. Students will be exposed to a wide range of cases, from misdemeanors to felonies. Students will have the opportunity to investigate cases, interview witnesses and prepare cases for trial. Students will also learn about the CPS system and factors in this system that impact the delinquency cases and the youth that are facing charges. The clinic will consist of a classroom component and a practical component. The classroom component will focus on case preparation, negotiating the CPS system, advocacy skills and ethical considerations. The practical component will allow students to handle different aspects of real cases including appearing in court, negotiating plea agreements and preparing cases for trial.

5197 Landlord/Tenant Law Lab - MARQUEZ (offered in Fall  2018)
Landlord & Tenant Law- This one credit hour practical course will provide students who are co-registered in 5318 - Landlord & Tenant Course a real-life legal experience giving advice and counsel to members of the community who have consumer law problems – including landlord/tenant issues. This course allows students to reinforce the landlord/tenant laws they are learning in the associated Landlord & Tenant Course. Students will be required to work in the “lab” for 50 hours over the course of the semester at times arranged with the lab supervisor.

5397 Law Office Management: Advanced Legal Marketing and Ethics (Distance Learning-Hybrid) - BROWN (offered in Fall  2017)
: This course is a project-based discussing the practical and ethical issues related to legal marketing. While many forms of legal advertising will be discussed, the class will focus on current trends in digital marketing including search engine optimization and pay per click advertising. Each student will prepare an advertising plan for a law firm which will include the advertising strategy and state bar compliance.

5297 Legal Spanish for Spanish Speakers - ROMERO (offered in Spring  2019)
An advanced-language course for students already fluent in Spanish. Students will strengthen their communicative language skills such as speaking, writing, interpreting, and vocabulary building within the context of several areas of legal practice, including but not limited to criminal law, civil law, and immigration law.

5297 Licensing & Technology Transfer - MAVRAKAKIS/BRUCCULERI (offered in Fall  2018)
A study of licensing in the following types of licenses: patent, copyright, trademark, know-how, and digital information.

5297 Long Term Care and The Law - STERNTHAL (offered in Spring  2019)
Course Outline: Long Term Care and the Law - This course will focus on legal issues relevant to the operations of long term care providers across the continuum of care, including senior housing, assisted living, nursing facilities, Continuing Care Retirement Communities, and hospice and home health. These legal issues include licensure and accreditation, quality regulation and assurance, admission and discharge policies, reimbursement, and care coordination. We will discuss these issue from a policy context as well as through the statutory, regulatory, and common law framework.

5297 Mental Health Law - TOVINO (offered in Spring  2019)
This course will examine a variety of civil and administrative issues pertaining to mental health care access, quality, liability, and finance. Particular attention will be given to federal and state mental health parity law and mandatory mental health and substance use disorder law; federal and state regulation of interventions such as restraint, seclusion, electroconvulsive therapy, and psychosurgery; federal and state laws protecting the confidentiality of mental health and substance use disorder records; state law scope of practice issues for mental health professionals, including psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, advance nurse practitioners, and counselors; state regulation of involuntary inpatient and outpatient commitment; and civil liability and/or professional discipline for negligent failure to diagnose, negligent misdiagnosis, negligent treatment, negligent referral, sexual and romantic relationships with patients, patient injury following elopement, and patient suicide.

5297 Mental Health Law - TOVINO (offered in Spring  2017)
This course will examine a variety of civil and administrative issues pertaining to mental health care access, quality, liability, and finance. Particular attention will be given to federal and state mental health parity law and mandatory mental health and substance use disorder law; federal and state regulation of interventions such as restraint, seclusion, electroconvulsive therapy, and psychosurgery; federal and state laws protecting the confidentiality of mental health and substance use disorder records; state law scope of practice issues for mental health professionals, including psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, advance nurse practitioners, and counselors; state regulation of involuntary inpatient and outpatient commitment; and civil liability and/or professional discipline for negligent failure to diagnose, negligent misdiagnosis, negligent treatment, negligent referral, sexual and romantic relationships with patients, patient injury following elopement, and patient suicide.

5297 Negotiation and Creative Problem Solving - BOLON / KELLY (offered in SummerMini  2017)
"Negotiation tactics & strategies, including creating value, claiming value, and coalition building. Will feature exercises and guest speakers and will link negotiation skills to legal practice. Mandatory attendance and participation, requiring robust pre-class preparation each week."

5297 Negotiation and Creative Problem Solving - KELLY/BLOCK (offered in SummerMini  2018)
"Negotiation tactics & strategies, including creating value, claiming value, and coalition building. Will feature exercises and guest speakers and will link negotiation skills to legal practice. Mandatory attendance and participation, requiring robust pre-class preparation each week."

5297 Negotiation in Sports - LAWRENCE/JONES (offered in Summer II  2018)
The skill of negotiating is required in all areas and all phases of legal practice. The purpose of the negotiation course can be described in terms of providing participants with a theoretical framework and practical tools for resolving issues on favorable terms while maintaining or enhancing relationships. The objectives for the course are to help participants better understand the significance of process in negotiation, the importance of preparation in achieving objectives, and the value of adherence to fundamental principles; to provide participants with practical tools to prepare more effectively, to organize thinking to help make critical decisions, to adopt and implement effective negotiation strategies, and to learn from future negotiations; and to help participants improve negotiation skills.

5297 Negotiation in Sports - LAWRENCE/JONES (offered in Spring  2019)
The skill of negotiating is required in all areas and all phases of legal practice. The purpose of the negotiation course can be described in terms of providing participants with a theoretical framework and practical tools for resolving issues on favorable terms while maintaining or enhancing relationships. The objectives for the course are to help participants better understand the significance of process in negotiation, the importance of preparation in achieving objectives, and the value of adherence to fundamental principles; to provide participants with practical tools to prepare more effectively, to organize thinking to help make critical decisions, to adopt and implement effective negotiation strategies, and to learn from future negotiations; and to help participants improve negotiation skills.

5297 Negotiation in Sports - LAWRENCE/JONES (offered in Summer II  2019)
The skill of negotiating is required in all areas and all phases of legal practice. The purpose of the negotiation course can be described in terms of providing participants with a theoretical framework and practical tools for resolving issues on favorable terms while maintaining or enhancing relationships. The objectives for the course are to help participants better understand the significance of process in negotiation, the importance of preparation in achieving objectives, and the value of adherence to fundamental principles; to provide participants with practical tools to prepare more effectively, to organize thinking to help make critical decisions, to adopt and implement effective negotiation strategies, and to learn from future negotiations; and to help participants improve negotiation skills.

5297 Offshore Energy Development - MCCAY (offered in Spring  2019)
The course will cover Deepwater Gulf of Mexico Lease Sales, Joint Operating Agreements, Participation Agreements, Suspensions of Operations or Production, the cycle time from lease acquisition to first oil or gas, mid-stream issues (pipelines to shore and Production Handling Agreements), development of infrastructure, internal approval processes of Lessees, federal regulations and Notices to Lessees addressing these matters, and other related topics.

5297 Offshore Energy Development - MCCAY (offered in Spring  2018)
The course will cover Deepwater Gulf of Mexico Lease Sales, Joint Operating Agreements, Participation Agreements, Suspensions of Operations or Production, the cycle time from lease acquisition to first oil or gas, mid-stream issues (pipelines to shore and Production Handling Agreements), development of infrastructure, internal approval processes of Lessees, federal regulations and Notices to Lessees addressing these matters, and other related topics.

5297 Oil & Gas Pipeline Regulation - JOHNSON/NEAL (offered in Spring  2018)
The increased demand for electric power generation and the development of shale gas plays in the United States have created a need for additional domestic pipeline infrastructure for natural gas pipelines and oil/condensate pipelines. At the same time, pipeline development and operation is receiving increased scrutiny and opposition from regulators and non-governmental organizations opposed to climate change and environmental impacts or concerned with pipeline safety. This course will provide an overview of the principal substantive laws and regulatory mechanisms that govern the construction and operation of oil and natural gas pipelines including the Interstate Commerce Act, Natural Gas Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, Clean Water Act, Pipeline Safety Act, and Endangered Species Act among others. This course will be taught using statutes, court cases, and agency decisions assembled by Professor Johnson; these course reading materials will be made available through the Associate Dean's office prior to the first day of class.

5297 Oil & Gas Pipeline Regulation - JOHNSON/NEAL (offered in Spring  2017)
The increased demand for electric power generation and the development of shale gas plays in the United States have created a need for additional domestic pipeline infrastructure for natural gas pipelines and oil/condensate pipelines. At the same time, pipeline development and operation is receiving increased scrutiny and opposition from regulators and non-governmental organizations opposed to climate change and environmental impacts or concerned with pipeline safety. This course will provide an overview of the principal substantive laws and regulatory mechanisms that govern the construction and operation of oil and natural gas pipelines including the Interstate Commerce Act, Natural Gas Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, Clean Water Act, Pipeline Safety Act, and Endangered Species Act among others. This course will be taught using statutes, court cases, and agency decisions assembled by Professor Johnson; these course reading materials will be made available through the Associate Dean's office prior to the first day of class.

5397 Oil & Gas Tax - WRIGHT (offered in Spring  2017)
Oil and Gas Income Taxation covers the United States federal income taxation of domestic oil and gas operations and transactions. The course examines taxation associated with the operational life cycle of oil and gas operations including exploration, development, production and abandonment. The study of transactions involving oil and gas interests analyzes acquisition, disposition, structuring and investment. Course participants learn the historical context and development of oil and gas provisions found in the U.S. tax law. Current tax legislative proposals or enactments that affect the oil and gas industry are addressed if warranted. The emphasis is on federal income taxation of domestic oil and gas transactions, although certain international tax aspects of the oil and gas business will be referenced and contrasted throughout the class. Outline updated 1/13/17

5397 Oil & Gas Tax - WRIGHT (offered in Spring  2018)
Oil and Gas Income Taxation covers the United States federal income taxation of domestic oil and gas operations and transactions. The course examines taxation associated with the operational life cycle of oil and gas operations including exploration, development, production and abandonment. The study of transactions involving oil and gas interests analyzes acquisition, disposition, structuring and investment. Course participants learn the historical context and development of oil and gas provisions found in the U.S. tax law. Current tax legislative proposals or enactments that affect the oil and gas industry are addressed if warranted. The emphasis is on federal income taxation of domestic oil and gas transactions, although certain international tax aspects of the oil and gas business will be referenced and contrasted throughout the class. Outline updated 1/13/17

5297 Patent Post Grant Proceeding - WYDE/FISCHMAN (offered in Spring  2018)

5397 Privacy & Data Protection - TODD (offered in Spring  2018)
This introductory course will cover the basic principles of privacy and data protection law. It will examine the policies underlying this still-nascent form of protection, and certain of those areas of tort, criminal, and Constitutional law pertinent to privacy, including corporate compliance and application of these principals. It will cover the substance of some federal privacy statutes relating to surveillance, record-keeping, and financial information. It will also cover certain state privacy statutes, the privacy-related activities of the Federal Trade Commission, and the structure and substance of privacy law in the European Union. There are no prerequisites for this course.

5397 Promoting Sustainable Oil and Gas Projects: Legal and Social Frameworks - WEAVER/GOLDEN TIMSAR (offered in Spring  2018)
The course will explore in detail different questions and issues with regards to the stakeholders’ roles in the energy development and its relation to legal and social factors. This course provides professionals, policy makers, and community stakeholders with a preliminary understanding of legal and social challenges and opportunities facing energy development. As such, students will learn methodologies to develop and analyze frameworks that address stakeholder priorities and dynamics using best policies and practices. These skills have potential to enlarge participation, improve transparency, and narrow knowledge gaps between energy companies, local and state governments, and civil society.

5397 Public Health Law - WINNIKE (offered in Fall  2017)
This course provides an in-depth examination of public health law principles and challenges. Students will explore constitutional issues related to public health and develop an understanding of the state’s public health powers and duties as they are balanced against an individual's legally protected rights. The course will explore a range of public health law issues, including infectious disease control measures, immunization policy, emergency preparedness and bioterrorism, government regulation of unhealthy products, the state’s role in promoting healthy behaviors, and public health surveillance and privacy issues.

5397 Real Estate Transactions, Practical Drafting - LONG (offered in Spring  2017)
This is a “nuts & bolts” practical course that will consider the basic building blocks of real estate transactions, a survey of a wide range of various common real esate transaction, and related matters. Many of the topics to be covered apply both to commercial and consumer real estate transactions. Some consumer transactions will be considered, but the primary focus will be on commercial transactions. Matters to be covered will include conveyancing documents, recordation statutes, purchase and sale agreements, chain of title, selected oil, gas and mineral issues as they may impact on real estate title and development, title insurance, basic methods of real estate finance, promissory notes, deeds of trust, troubled loan workout issues, foreclosure, leases, ethics and lawyers liability issues in real estate transactions. Course assignments will include the drafting of various documents, including deeds, promissory notes, sales contracts, and selected provisions of deeds of trust, foreclosure documents, and leases.

5297 Representing Energy Borrowers - DOLE/DOLE/KEYES (offered in Spring  2017)
Course Description and Prerequisite This two-hour course introduces students to the structure and customary documentation of bank credit facilities secured by personal property collateral through the documentation of a hypothetical commercial loan scenario. Both documents from actual transactions and model forms will be utilized. Techniques for maximizing Article 9 rights and avoiding fraudulent transfers will be emphasized. The Texas special loan agreement statute of frauds and Texas usury law will be discussed. Students will participate in a maximum of four drafting exercises involving such topics as reconciling a draft Credit Agreement and a Term Sheet, drafting a Security Agreement and a Financing Statement implementing a Credit Agreement, drafting a Limited Guaranty implementing a Credit Agreement, and redrafting a Legal Opinion with respect to the enforceability of the hypothetical transaction documents and the perfection of the security interest created by the hypothetical transaction Security Agreement and Financing Statement. SUCCESSFUL COMPLETION OF THIS TWO-HOUR COURSE WILL SATISFY IN FULL THE LAW CENTER SKILLS COURSE REQUIREMENT.

5297 Resistance in the Courts: Civil Rights Litigation - SEGURA/TRIGILIO (offered in Spring  2019)
While courts have served as an important safeguard to constitutional rights and liberties, the road to justice can be challenging—whether you seek to combat government abuses on systemic level or seek justice on behalf of an individual client. Nevertheless, the most pressing civil rights issues of our time continue to be decided through our judicial system. This is a 2-credit simulation course for students who are interested in deepening their knowledge of civil rights litigation—with a particular focus on issues stemming from actions against state and local actors under Section 1983. During this course, we will study substantive and practice-oriented issues, as well as some of the strategic and ethical considerations faced by lawyers working in the field. In order to ground the course in real-world issues, we will use a recent or on-going civil rights lawsuits as case studies. Students will also engage in in-class simulations.

5297 Secured Financing - HAWKINS (offered in Spring  2017)
Because lenders are concerned with ensuring debtors repay them, a lot of lending only occurs if the debtor puts up some collateral for the loan. This course examines the law that governs these transactions--the law of secured financing--found in Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. We will discuss how a lender obtains a security interest in a debtor's property, how a lender perfects its interest, and what happens when two lenders claim an interest in the same property. The course is taught using a problem-based approach.

5297 Space Law - BRESNIK (offered in Spring  2019)
The major objectives are to provide a basic understanding of the legal regime governing outer space, including the moon and other celestial bodies. In providing this basic understanding the course would start with an analysis of the development of space law and fundamental legal principles applicable to outer space, to also include the International Space Station and its legal structure. After providing a basic understanding, the course will then concentrate on recent developments and more specific topics in space law which include property rights and claim of sovereignty over outer space and celestial bodies, Outer Space Treaty requirement that are applicability to new proposed activities in space, commercialization and privatization of low earth orbit, orbital debris legal issues and governance, intellectual property and export control laws as applicable to space activities. The course will also cover the very recent developments at a national level by examining recent U.S. developments in the areas of space law and policy.

5297 Spanish for Lawyers I - ROMERO (offered in Spring  2017)
An introductory level Spanish course designed for students with little or no previous Spanish language knowledge. Speaking, listening, reading, writing, and vocabulary development skills will be practiced within the context of legal professions, especially criminal, family, and immigration law. Special emphasis on oral communication. Student must fill out a short questionnaire in order to assess their current Spanish language level.

5297 Sports Law - MILLER (offered in Spring  2017)
The course examines a wide range of amateur and professional sports topics, including the athlete/agent relationship, contracts, commissioner powers and league governance, gender discrimination and Title IX, stadium and spectator liabilities, anti-trust, labor and employment issues, intellectual property and licensing, constitutional law, and ethics. Skills focus on contract development, negotiation, dispute resolution and writing.

5497 Street Law - MARRUS/NEELY (offered in Spring  2017)
Law students will teach high school age students about the law including constitutional law, family law, criminal law, housing law, and other areas. Street Law empowers young people to be active, engaged citizens by equipping them with the knowledge and skills they need to successfully participate in their communities. Law students will gain a greater knowledge of substantive law and how to explain the law to lay people, develop their ability for oral presentations both in formal settings and thinking on their feet, improve legal research skills, and gain an understanding of the legal system in the context of those persons directly affected by it. Students will participate in a weekly seminar class that will provide the resources and tools necessary for teaching the law to high school students and will commit to teach approximately 4 hours a week in a high school or a community organization. Information sessions will be held on Monday, October 17th at noon in Room TUII – 215, Tuesday, October 18th at noon in Room TUII – 215 and Tuesday, October 18th at 4:30 in Room TUII-211. For more information on the benefits of this course for law students go to http://www.law.uh.edu/assignments/spring2017/5497StreetLaw.pdf To fill out an application go to https://uhlc.wufoo.com/forms/street-law-survey/

5497 Street Law II - MARRUS/NEELY (offered in Spring  2018)
Law students will teach high school age students about the law including constitutional law, family law, criminal law, housing law, and other areas. Street Law empowers young people to be active, engaged citizens by equipping them with the knowledge and skills they need to successfully participate in their communities. Law students will gain a greater knowledge of substantive law and how to explain the law to lay people, develop their ability for oral presentations both in formal settings and thinking on their feet, improve legal research skills, and gain an understanding of the legal system in the context of those persons directly affected by it. Students will participate in a weekly seminar class that will provide the resources and tools necessary for teaching the law to high school students and will commit to teach approximately 4 hours a week in a high school or a community organization. Information sessions more info to be announced.

5497 Street Law II - MARRUS (offered in Spring  2019)
Law students will teach high school age students about the law as a continuation of Street Law I. The semester also includes preparing the high school age students to compete in a Mock Trial competition. Street Law empowers young people to be active, engaged citizens by equipping them with the knowledge and skills they need to successfully participate in their communities. Law students will gain a greater knowledge of substantive law and how to explain the law to lay people, develop their ability for oral presentations both in formal settings and thinking on their feet, improve legal research skills, and gain an understanding of the legal system in the context of those persons directly affected by it. Students will participate in a weekly seminar class that will provide the resources and tools necessary for teaching the law to high school students and will commit to teach approximately 3-4 hours a week in a high school or a community organization.

5297 Superfund Liability and Brownfields Redevelopment - SHERMAN (offered in Fall  2018)
From surplus property transactions to urban redevelopment efforts, the risks posed by historical contamination at abandoned or underutilized sites can impede community revitalization initiatives and the real estate marketplace at large. This course will address the liability, regulatory, and redevelopment challenges presented by the federal Superfund law (Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act or CERCLA). The course also will explore reforms to the U.S. EPA’s Superfund program that seek to promote the cleanup and redevelopment of brownfield sites and the role of state Voluntary Cleanup Programs. These topics, for the purposes of course presentation, will be analyzed in four sections: “Superfund Liability and Brownfield Protections”, "Environmental Due Diligence", "Negotiating with Federal and State Regulators" and “Transaction and Revitalization Strategies”. Each course segment will introduce students to a substantive evaluation of the core Superfund issues presented and offer insights into the legal concepts, regulatory programs, deal documents, and remediation approaches available to environmental lawyers and community leaders to manage these challenges. During the course of the semester, students will be given two short, practical writing assignments related to the subject matter (e.g., preparing comments to a regulatory agency or legislative committee or drafting an advocacy piece relating to a Superfund cleanup or a brownfield project). The final assignment will be the preparation of a client memorandum analyzing the CERCLA issues in a community revitalization initiative or a real estate project and making a recommendation on whether - and if so, how - to proceed with the project notwithstanding the challenges presented. The final project should be approximately 15 – 20 pages. The instructor will work closely with each student on their work. Grades are based on written work during the semester. There is no final examination. Completion of the course will position students to identify and analyze issues under the federal Superfund law, to evaluate their impact on community revitalization efforts and private sector real estate projects, and to manage the challenges presented. Additionally, students should gain an understanding of the respective roles and goals of government regulators, community leaders, and landowners in Superfund and brownfield efforts.

5397 Tax Policy - BUCKLES (offered in Spring  2017)
Designed (i) to introduce students to recurring themes of tax policy; and (ii) to develop students’ ability to analyze and discuss existing and proposed laws in terms of the tax policies that such laws do and do not serve.

5297 Terrorism and the Law - MARTINEZ/HAMDANI (offered in Summer I  2017)
This course will focus on the U.S. Government’s authority and limitations to prevent and prosecute acts of terrorism in the homeland and elsewhere. Special attention will be given to national security policies and laws that affect the individual privacy rights of all citizens. Topics will include the designation of enemy combatants, military tribunals, and detention of suspects at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Attention will also be given to the use of secret wiretaps used by the FBI and other federal stakeholders to monitor terrorist activity. Particular attention will be given to limits the courts place on the President and Congress as they attempt to protect the nation from attacks by al Qaeda, ISIS and other foreign terrorist organizations. Guest speakers from the FBI, CIA and DOD will appear in class to discuss the role their agencies play in the war on terror. *The views expressed by the professors do not necessarily reflect the views of their respective employer – The United States Department of Justice.

5297 Terrorism and the Law - MARTINEZ/HAMDANI (offered in Summer I  2018)
This course will focus on the U.S. Government’s authority and limitations to prevent and prosecute acts of terrorism in the homeland and elsewhere. Special attention will be given to national security policies and laws that affect the individual privacy rights of all citizens. Topics will include the designation of enemy combatants, military tribunals, and detention of suspects at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. Attention will also be given to the use of secret wiretaps used by the FBI and other federal stakeholders to monitor terrorist activity. Particular attention will be given to limits the courts place on the President and Congress as they attempt to protect the nation from attacks by al Qaeda, ISIS and other foreign terrorist organizations. Guest speakers from the FBI, CIA and DOD will appear in class to discuss the role their agencies play in the war on terror. *The views expressed by the professors do not necessarily reflect the views of their respective employer – The United States Department of Justice.

5297 Texas Consumer Law - ALDERMAN (offered in Spring  2017)
This course will be a condensed version of the three-hour Texas Consumer Law course, taught in the spring semester. Emphasis will be placed on those areas of law that are examined on the Texas Bar. Numerous old bar questions will be reviewed. Material that will not be covered includes products liability, warranty, and federal debt collection.

5197 Texas Consumer Law Lab - MARQUEZ (offered in Spring  2019)
Consumer Law- This one credit hour practical course will provide students who are co-registered in 5348 – Texas Consumer Law Course a real-life legal experience giving advice and counsel to members of the community who have consumer law problems. This course allows students to reinforce the consumer law statues they are learning in the associated Consumer Law Course. Students will be required to work in the “lab” for 50 hours over the course of the semester at times arranged with the lab supervisor.

5397 Texas Criminal Appellate Procedure - ROE (offered in Fall  2017)
This upper-level class will focus on state criminal appellate procedure, with emphasis placed on the Texas Rules of Appellate Procedure and, where applicable to state appellate practice, the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure. The general approach of this course will be twofold: 1) to examine case law interpretation of the procedural rules that govern post-judgment criminal procedure in Texas, from motions for new trial through state post-conviction writs of habeas corpus; and 2) to discuss the most common substantive issues which arise in appellate proceedings in state courts, including claims of ineffective assistance of trial counsel, sufficiency of the evidence, appellate review of jury charge error, Brady violations and actual innocence claims.

5197 Texas Legal Research ( Distance Learning) - WATSON (offered in Summer I  2019)
This course will expand on research skills explored in your first-year lawyering skills and strategies course with a focus on Texas specific resources. Topics for the class will include sources for Texas case law, statutory, and regulatory research; secondary sources and practitioners’ materials specific to Texas; and understanding and using Texas legislative histories. Throughout the course, you will learn the research skills typical of a new attorney. You will know how to: • Identify a full range of Texas primary and secondary materials available, regardless of type or format • Locate Texas statutes, rules, and regulations using effective and efficient search techniques • Analyze and interpret what you find • Apply your research findings to a set of facts based in Texas law

5297 Texas Legislative Advocacy - SMITH,E (offered in Fall  2017)
As an attorney, your clients will look to you for guidance on the law. Many times, the law will be in existence already. But what if you could help shape the law as it is written? What if you need to change the law for your client to find relief? This course will teach you how to engage in the legislative process, to understand the legislative process as well as the players. This course will feature many guest speakers such as State Senators, State Representatives, legislative staff and practicing government affairs attorneys. Every area of law has a corresponding state agency, and oftentimes a federal agency, and it is incumbent upon lawyers to understand the systems in place to establish law and how to advocate within that system. In particular, Texas has many opportunities for lawyers at state agencies and in legislative offices. This course is designed to prepare students for both general practice as well as an introduction to careers in public service. Course style and workload: The style of this course will be heavy discussion, dynamic class activities and engagement with guest speakers. There will be a short assignment each week along with assigned reading at the appropriate level for a two credit course. One course will be devoted to networking strategy and will involve a reception or dinner based on the student enrollment in the course. No assigned books for the course.

5397 The Art of Advocacy: Trial Persuasion in a Polarized World - LITTLEPAGE/BOOTH (offered in Fall  2017)
Throw out the old and embrace the new: we now have a highly polarized country where a jury with totally divergent views still have to agree on a verdict. Learn from real litigators how to handle a case in this environment; from A to Z. Taught by two practicing lawyers with decades of plaintiff and defense courtroom experience, this class highlights cutting edge techniques for persuasion and trial advocacy. Become comfortable with the art of case assessment, work-up, visual storytelling, case framing, arguing motions before a judge, developing – and defending against - safety rules, examination of witnesses and composing a winning closing argument. Then practice, practice, practice as each week you put into action what you learned the week before. Leave this course with the skills needed to present a case from beginning to end as well as materials and notes that will become your litigation bible.

5397 The Art of Advocacy: Trial Persuasion in a Polarized World - LITTLEPAGE/BOOTH (offered in Spring  2018)
Throw out the old and embrace the new: we now have a highly polarized country where a jury with totally divergent views still have to agree on a verdict. Learn from real litigators how to handle a case in this environment; from A to Z. Taught by two practicing lawyers with decades of plaintiff and defense courtroom experience, this class highlights cutting edge techniques for persuasion and trial advocacy. Become comfortable with the art of case assessment, work-up, visual storytelling, case framing, arguing motions before a judge, developing – and defending against - safety rules, examination of witnesses and composing a winning closing argument. Then practice, practice, practice as each week you put into action what you learned the week before. Leave this course with the skills needed to present a case from beginning to end as well as materials and notes that will become your litigation bible.

5297 The Current Crisis in the Middle East - FOTEH (offered in SummerMini  2018)
This course will provide insight into substantive areas of history, religion, politics (regional and worldwide), longstanding relationships, legal systems, human rights and women’s rights framed by current events in the most volatile and important region in the world. Since the beginning of civilization, the Middle East has been the hotbed of ongoing conflict. It is to the point where one conflict is almost indistinguishable from another. The current provocation between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the Islamic Republic of Iran could potentially alter the map of the Middle East and have a massive irrevocable impact on the entire world. This course will begin by examining the issues leading up to the current hostility and continue through the potential outcomes and its potential impact on the world. This course will be a timely and interesting way to begin to understand the issues involved in this region and how it can impact Houston and the world.

5297 The Current Crisis in the Middle East - FOTEH (offered in SummerMini  2019)
This course will provide insight into substantive areas of history, religion, politics (regional and worldwide), longstanding relationships, legal systems, human rights and women’s rights framed by current events in the most volatile and important region in the world. Since the beginning of civilization, the Middle East has been the hotbed of ongoing conflict. It is to the point where one conflict is almost indistinguishable from another. The current provocation between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the Islamic Republic of Iran could potentially alter the map of the Middle East and have a massive irrevocable impact on the entire world. This course will begin by examining the issues leading up to the current hostility and continue through the potential outcomes and its potential impact on the world. This course will be a timely and interesting way to begin to understand the issues involved in this region and how it can impact Houston and the world.

5297 The Current Crisis in the Middle East - FOTEH (offered in SummerMini  2017)
This course will provide insight into substantive areas of history, religion, politics (regional and worldwide), longstanding relationships, legal systems, human rights and women’s rights framed by current events in the most volatile and important region in the world. Since the beginning of civilization, the Middle East has been the hotbed of ongoing conflict. It is to the point where one conflict is almost indistinguishable from another. The current provocation between the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the Islamic Republic of Iran could potentially alter the map of the Middle East and have a massive irrevocable impact on the entire world. This course will begin by examining the issues leading up to the current hostility and continue through the potential outcomes and its potential impact on the world. This course will be a timely and interesting way to begin to understand the issues involved in this region and how it can impact Houston and the world.

5397 The Modern Day Trial Lawyer: Redefining Trials & Trial Lawyers - SOLAR (offered in Spring  2019)
The focus of this course is on the underlying foundation of trial skills. It is about “being” as opposed to “doing”. This course will analyze and discuss whether or not, indeed, those classical Trial Lawyer characteristics are even relevant in an age where less than 2% of cases filed are tried to a jury verdict. The new reality is that we have increasingly become “litigators.” A mediator is the new Judge, and the mediator’s office is the new Courtroom. This new era of glorified litigators tests our ability to maximize recoveries for our clients through increasingly sophisticated arbitrations, mediations, or private trials.

5297 The Wire - BRALEY (offered in Summer I  2018)
This course explores advanced criminal procedure concepts and policy issues raised by David Simon's critically acclaimed HBO series, “The Wire.” Among the topics explored, will be the use of electronic surveillance in law enforcement and the policy and constitutional implications of its use with and without judicial approval, confessions, profiling, charging and disposition of criminal cases, honesty and accountability of law enforcement, the war on drugs, and the distribution of resources in the criminal justice system. In addition to class participation, grades will be determined based on a paper that students will be responsible for drafting and submitting at the end of the semester. Before enrolling in this course, please be advised that “The Wire” contains a considerable amount of violence and offensive language, and this course will require you to watch the first two seasons of the show in advance of the first class.

5297 The Wire - BRALEY (offered in Summer I  2017)
This course explores advanced criminal procedure concepts and policy issues raised by David Simon's critically acclaimed HBO series, “The Wire.” Among the topics explored, will be the use of electronic surveillance in law enforcement and the policy and constitutional implications of its use with and without judicial approval, confessions, profiling, charging and disposition of criminal cases, honesty and accountability of law enforcement, the war on drugs, and the distribution of resources in the criminal justice system. In addition to class participation, grades will be determined based on a paper that students will be responsible for drafting and submitting at the end of the semester. Before enrolling in this course, please be advised that “The Wire” contains a considerable amount of violence and offensive language, and this course will require you to watch the first two seasons of the show in advance of the first class.

5297 Trademark Prosecution - HUNT (offered in SummerMini  2017)
This two-hour course provides hands-on training and instruction on the procedure of Trademark prosecution, from pre-application searching and client admonishment through the filing of renewal documents ten years after registration. Particular attention will be paid to the bases for application-filings and common refusals. Class discussion will focus on the law, precedent, and the USPTO’s Trademark Manual of Examining Procedure. The course will also familiarize students with the electronic systems used by the trademark bar for searching databases of current registrations and pending applications, filing electronic applications, and responding to official correspondence issued by the USPTO. Upon completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and understanding required to prosecute a trademark registration for others when licensed to practice law.

5297 Trademark Prosecution - HUNT (offered in SummerMini  2018)
This two-hour course provides hands-on training and instruction on the procedure of Trademark prosecution, from pre-application searching and client admonishment through the filing of renewal documents ten years after registration. Particular attention will be paid to the bases for application-filings and common refusals. Class discussion will focus on the law, precedent, and the USPTO’s Trademark Manual of Examining Procedure. The course will also familiarize students with the electronic systems used by the trademark bar for searching databases of current registrations and pending applications, filing electronic applications, and responding to official correspondence issued by the USPTO. Upon completion of this course, students will have the knowledge and understanding required to prosecute a trademark registration for others when licensed to practice law.

5397 Transnational Petroleum Law - CARDENAS (offered in Spring  2017)
This course features the transnational petroleum law method that provides the tools to understand the regulation that governs foreign investments in the oil and gas industry worldwide. The course will provide model contracts, standardized regulation and a collection of excerpts of arbitral awards in the oil industry which will guide our understanding of new practices in the oil and gas industry. Cases under study will cover oil and gas arbitration in Latin America, North America, Europe Asia, Africa and the Middle East. For example: cases of international arbitration related to expropriation or indirect expropriation in Russia, Venezuela and Ecuador; the use of industry best practices in Nigeria, Sudan, Mexico and Canada; the protection of foreign investments in the case of armed conflicts (Libya, Sudan and Colombia); repatriation of capital in Venezuela and dispute resolution practice for petroleum investment.

5397 Trial Advocacy for Non-Litigators - LUKIN/BROWN/WEINMANN (offered in Spring  2017)
Trial Advocacy for Non-Litigators provides students who do not have any trial experience with a chance to gain basic litigation training. This class is ideal for students who plan to pursue a career as a transactional attorney, but want to acquire the knowledge and skills required to try a case. The class is a mirror of the evening trial advocacy class, so students will learn the skills of case analysis, direct examination, cross examination, opening statement, closing argument, and voir dire. The course provides learning by doing and requires skill performance by each student every week. The final examination is a full jury trial performed at the Harris County Courthouse. Evidence is not a requirement for this course. Evidentiary issues relating to the case files will be identified by faculty and discussed in class. Mock trial students or students with previous trial training are not eligible for this class.

5397 Trial Strategy and Case Management: The Art of Winning at an Unfair Game - SOLAR (offered in Spring  2018)
The primary objective of this course is to arm the prospective solo or small firm lawyers with the strategic and tactical tools necessary for winning against the odds. You will, among other things, learn: what it means to be an entrepreneur; how to develop a business plan; how to promote yourself and your practice ethically; how to interview a prospective client; how to draft an ethical and enforceable contract of employment; whether to keep a case or refer it out; how to recognize and prosecute a winning case. You will learn how David beat Goliath and so that you can, too.

5397 Trial Strategy and Case Management: The Art of Winning at an Unfair Game - SOLAR (offered in Spring  2019)
The primary objective of this course is to arm the prospective solo or small firm lawyers with the strategic and tactical tools necessary for winning against the odds. You will, among other things, learn: what it means to be an entrepreneur; how to develop a business plan; how to promote yourself and your practice ethically; how to interview a prospective client; how to draft an ethical and enforceable contract of employment; whether to keep a case or refer it out; how to recognize and prosecute a winning case. You will learn how David beat Goliath and so that you can, too.

5397 U.S. Biotechnology Regulatory Framework - EVANS (offered in Spring  2019)
This course provides a practice-oriented introduction to the U.S. Coordinated Framework for regulating fast-emerging technologies such as smart robots, artificial intelligence software, precision medicine, neurotechnologies and advanced prosthetics, genomic testing and gene-edited life forms. Collectively, these technologies promise to revolutionize healthcare, enhance human capabilities, and address nagging environmental and social problems such as world hunger, yet they threaten to displace workers (including, potentially, in law) and disrupt entire economic sectors. The course offers a manageable, highly practical survey of key US safety regulations administered by agencies including the Food and Drug Administration, the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It also samples the difficult ethical, privacy, societal, and human rights issues these technologies are already raising.

5297 Voir Dire: Art of Convincing Strangers to Speak Freely - RAVEN (offered in Fall  2018)
Voir Dire: Theory & Practice is a course that addresses the art of convincing strangers to speak freely. Students will learn the foundational aspects of voir dire, and they will learn and demonstrate (through in class exercises) the application of these techniques.

7397 WRC: Federal Pretrial Drafting - BREM (offered in Spring  2017)
Federal Pretrial Drafting is an upper level writing class designed to prepare students for “real world” litigation practice after law school. In the context of a single federal court case, students will draft basic pleadings, some minimal discovery documents, a short motion for summary judgment and accompanying response, and a mediation statement. Lectures will cover requirements for these documents under the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, but also enable students to refine their factual investigation, legal analysis and drafting skills. Students will receive ample feedback and opportunities to rewrite certain assignments to further hone these essential practice tools. Grading. The motion for summary judgment and response, along with associated rewrites, will comprise 50% of your final grade.  Discovery documents and any associated rewrites will comprise 20% of your final grade.  Your remaining grade will be apportioned at 10% each among the following assignments: the complaint; the answer; and the mediation statement.

7397 WRC: General Drafting for Smaller to Midsize Firm Attorneys ( Distance Learning) - SWIFT (offered in Summer I  2017)
In this course you will develop skills necessary for drafting precise, clear, and complete documents. You will be exposed to drafting litigation documents, contracts, and other legal documents covering a wide-range of practice areas, similar to what some small to mid-size attorneys do, particularly early on in their careers. You will learn to research, evaluate, and use forms and checklists.

7397 WRC: General Drafting for Smaller to Midsize Firm Attorneys ( Distance Learning) - SWIFT (offered in Summer I  2018)
In this course you will develop skills necessary for drafting precise, clear, and complete documents. You will be exposed to drafting litigation documents, contracts, and other legal documents covering a wide-range of practice areas, similar to what some small to mid-size attorneys do, particularly early on in their careers. You will learn to research, evaluate, and use forms and checklists.

7397 WRC: General Drafting for Smaller to Midsize Firm Attorneys ( Distance Learning) - SWIFT (offered in Summer I  2019)
In this course you will develop skills necessary for drafting precise, clear, and complete documents. You will be exposed to drafting litigation documents, contracts, and other legal documents covering a wide-range of practice areas, similar to what some small to mid-size attorneys do, particularly early on in their careers. You will learn to research, evaluate, and use forms and checklists.

7397 WRC: Health Regulatory Process - MANTEL (offered in Spring  2017)
This course explores how legal and policy considerations, intra-governmental relationships, and political dynamics influence health regulatory policies. Guest speakers will include current and former U.S. Department of Health and Human Services officials and health care advocates.

7397 WRC: Health Transactions - MANTEL/McSTAY/SHEA (offered in Spring  2018)
In this advanced health law course students learn and apply substantive laws and lawyering skills to model health care transactions. Working in teams of associates under the supervision of the professors, including practicing health care attorneys, students will engage in health care contract drafting, client interviews, negotiations, due diligence, and regulatory analysis. The model health care transactions are based on deals commonly entered into by hospitals and health systems, including hospital-physician employment agreements, health care joint ventures, and acquisitions.

7297 WRC: Judicial Writing - BREVORKA (offered in Spring  2017)
For whom do judges write? How do judges develop a writing style? What does it take to write a “good” judicial opinion? By reading judicial opinions and writing their own judicial decisions students will examine the inner workings of judicial writing. In this class students will improve their own writing while simultaneously learning about the different styles of judicial opinion writing. The class is ideal for individuals who seek service as a judicial law clerk or as a judge. Initially, the course will focus on how students can set writing goals and continue motivating themselves during the writing and editing process. Students will learn about the importance of accuracy and detail in judicial opinions before exploring different styles of judicial writing. The course’s syllabus includes articles on judicial writing and style, numerous judicial opinions, and books centered on writing and the development of writer’s grit. Classes will include discussion and analysis about readings, critiques of judicial opinions and classmates’ works, student presentations on the “writing style” of a judge, and guest speakers such as former clerks and judges. Outside of the classroom, students will develop a writing portfolio that includes a working checklist for error-proof opinions, a program for development as a writer, a bench brief, and a federal district court opinion.

7297 WRC: Judicial Writing - BREVORKA (offered in Fall  2018)
For whom do judges write? How do judges develop a writing style? What does it take to write a “good” judicial opinion? By reading judicial opinions and writing their own judicial decisions students will examine the inner workings of judicial writing. In this class students will improve their own writing while simultaneously learning about the different styles of judicial opinion writing. The class is ideal for individuals who seek service as a judicial law clerk or as a judge. Initially, the course will focus on how students can set writing goals and continue motivating themselves during the writing and editing process. Students will learn about the importance of accuracy and detail in judicial opinions before exploring different styles of judicial writing. The course’s syllabus includes articles on judicial writing and style, numerous judicial opinions, and books centered on writing and the development of writer’s grit. Classes will include discussion and analysis about readings, critiques of judicial opinions and classmates’ works, student presentations on the “writing style” of a judge, and guest speakers such as former clerks and judges. Outside of the classroom, students will develop a writing portfolio that includes a working checklist for error-proof opinions, a program for development as a writer, a bench brief, and a federal district court opinion.

7397 WRC: Making and Drafting Contracts - TOEDT (offered in Spring  2017)
The goal of this course is to help students prepare for a type of assignment they will likely see throughout their careers: that of drafting, reviewing, analyzing, explaining, and negotiating contracts. Students will: • explore various legal- and business issues that might need to be addressed in various types of contract (see the list below); • study principles of plain-English drafting for contracts and other legal documents; • review the etiquette and ethics of contract negotiations; • survey some legal pitfalls that could lead to jail time for both clients and lawyers, such as backdating contracts, violating antitrust laws, failing to comply with Sarbanes-Oxley Act obligations, paying off foreign officials, etc. • discuss how to tactfully advise clients (and supervising lawyers) about their options, so as to earn a reputation as a deal-maker, not a deal-breaker; • compare and contrast the roles of outside- versus in-house counsel in contract negotiations; • consider ways of positioning the client for future litigation, just in case. The types of contract to be studied will include some or all of: • employment agreements for employees and executives • lease agreements • distribution agreements • services agreements • license agreements • stock-option agreements • change-of-control agreements for employees and executives • arbitration agreements • settlement agreements • merger agreements • letters of intent / memoranda of understanding A business background is helpful but not required; all necessary business information will be covered in class and/or in reading materials.

7397 WRC: Written Advocacy - HOFFMANL (offered in Spring  2017)
This three-credit course satisfies the law school’s Upper Level Writing Requirement. It is designed to help students gain a sharper understanding of their writing tendencies and develop better writing skills and habits. It is especially suited for those who expect to have a civil litigation practice. Over the semester, we will work on several short writing assignments. Students will prepare multiple drafts of each assignment and receive feedback from the professor on each draft. There is no final exam.

7297 WRC:Advanced Legal Writing - MASELLI (offered in Fall  2017)
Course Description: Writing for Criminal Defense is an upper level class intended to help students become more proficient, efficient, and effective at researching and analyzing criminal law issues, and composing and organizing written documents. It will build on concepts learned in first year and will help students to refine and further develop problem solving, factual investigation and drafting skills. Assignments will include (1) writing a brief involving a complex legal issue; (2) drafting motions and other related documents, such as objections and memorandum; (3) communicating orally in motion hearings and client meetings. Assignments: There will be three graded writing assignments throughout the semester. The final brief will account for 50% of your grade. The other writing assignments will each account for 25% of your final grade. There will be ungraded writing assignments, as well.

7297 WRC:Advanced Legal Writing - MASELLI (offered in Fall  2017)
Course Description: Writing for Criminal Defense is an upper level class intended to help students become more proficient, efficient, and effective at researching and analyzing criminal law issues, and composing and organizing written documents. It will build on concepts learned in first year and will help students to refine and further develop problem solving, factual investigation and drafting skills. Assignments will include (1) writing a brief involving a complex legal issue; (2) drafting motions and other related documents, such as objections and memorandum; (3) communicating orally in motion hearings and client meetings. Assignments: There will be three graded writing assignments throughout the semester. The final brief will account for 50% of your grade. The other writing assignments will each account for 25% of your final grade. There will be ungraded writing assignments, as well.

7397 WRC:Advanced Legal Writing - MASELLI (offered in Fall  2019)
ALW is an upper level class intended to help students become more proficient, efficient, and effective at researching, analyzing legal issues, and composing and organizing written documents. It will build on concepts learned in first year Lawyering Skills and Strategies classes and will help students to refine and further develop problem solving, factual investigation and drafting skills. Assignments will include (1) writing a brief involving a complex legal issue; (2) drafting an opinion letters, attorney-client agreements and other reflective documents, and court documents, such as pleadings and motions; (3) communicating orally in motion hearings and client meetings.

7397 WRS: Advanced Contract Law - HAWKINS (offered in Spring  2019)
This course will consider advanced topics in contract law such as international sales agreements, common law quality warranties, arbitration clauses, and termination clauses . We will read and discuss law review articles, statutes, cases, and/or books that deal with contract law, and we will consider how to change the laws to meet policy goals. Students' grades will be based on an outline, rough draft, final paper, and presentation on a contract law topic, and on class participation

7297 WRS: Animal Law - MORATH (offered in Spring  2018)
Animal Law is one of the fastest growing fields of legal practice and may involve issues of constitutional law, administrative law, environmental law, family law, and estates and trusts. In this class, we will address a broad range of topics including: the historical status of animals in the law; state legislative efforts and citizen initiatives to strengthen animal protection laws; the application of federal laws, including the Endangered Species Act and the Animal Welfare Act, to captive animals, wildlife, and farm animals; animal-related torts; constitutional standing to sue on behalf of animals; companion animals and the law; and the movement to obtain legal recognition of the rights of animals. All perspectives will be considered in class discussion and assignments. The class will include a guest speaker and a field trip. Students will be assessed through a combination of classroom participation, written reflections, and a final paper.

7297 WRS: Animal Law - MORATH (offered in Spring  2017)
Animal Law is one of the fastest growing fields of legal practice and may involve issues of constitutional law, administrative law, environmental law, family law, and estates and trusts. In this class, we will address a broad range of topics including: the historical status of animals in the law; state legislative efforts and citizen initiatives to strengthen animal protection laws; the application of federal laws, including the Endangered Species Act and the Animal Welfare Act, to captive animals, wildlife, and farm animals; animal-related torts; constitutional standing to sue on behalf of animals; companion animals and the law; and the movement to obtain legal recognition of the rights of animals. All perspectives will be considered in class discussion and assignments. The class will include a guest speaker and a field trip. Students will be assessed through a combination of classroom participation, written reflections, and a final paper.

7397 WRS: Animal Law (Distance Learning) - MORATH (offered in Summer I  2019)
Animal Law is one of the fastest growing fields of legal practice and may involve issues of constitutional law, administrative law, environmental law, family law, and estates and trusts. In this class, we will address a broad range of topics including: the historical status of animals in the law; state legislative efforts and citizen initiatives to strengthen animal protection laws; the application of federal laws, including the Endangered Species Act and the Animal Welfare Act, to captive animals, wildlife, and farm animals; animal-related torts; constitutional standing to sue on behalf of animals; companion animals and the law; and the movement to obtain legal recognition of the rights of animals. All perspectives will be considered in class discussion and assignments. The class will include a guest speaker and a field trip. Students will be assessed through a combination of classroom participation, written reflections, and a final paper.

7397 WRS: Gender, Power, Law & Leadership - KNAKE (offered in Fall  2018)
This seminar is inspired by the glaring omission of women from positions of power and leadership in the legal profession and beyond. While women continue to enter law school and the legal profession in relatively equal numbers to men, they remain outside of the structures of power---in the judiciary, law firms, the corporate world and even legal education---in the United States and beyond. This reality is even worse for women of color. Researchers, scholars, and practitioners commit a great deal of time, energy and resources to trying to change the landscape, yet progress seems stalled. Interestingly, very little attention is paid to the site where it all begins: law school. In this way, it makes sense to devote attention in an academic context to this topic. This seminar exposes students to various theories of leadership and law (including feminist legal theory and critical race theory) and pursues an ongoing exploration of intersections of gender, race, power and law. As but a few examples, we will define the leadership landscape, identify (and consider solutions to overcome) barriers and obstacles to advancement, and address the question whether gender and race matter, using the judiciary and judicial decision making as a case study. In recognition of the power of narrative and storytelling, students select and read a biography about a transformative lawyer during the semester. Students must write a substantial research paper, and will receive guidance about how to potentially publish their research as an op-ed, trade publication essay, or scholarly article.

7397 WRS: Hot Topics in Health Policy - CHANDLER (offered in Fall  2017)
This writing seminar will examine immediate issues in health care finance, whatever they have emerged to as of Fall 2017. These are likely to include the Affordable Care Act, or whatever it has morphed into, and issues of Medicare finance, Medicaid finance, provider compensation systems, state healthcare reforms, and treatment of disabilities. Papers will be based not just on scholarly literature but on events of the day, including contemporary legislative and regulatory developments. The course will not address hot issues in bioethics.

7397 WRS: Immigration Law & Business - OLIVAS (offered in Spring  2019)
This course, which will be open to 2L, 3L, 4L, and LLM students, as well as graduate students in UH departments outside the Law Center, will assume some familiarity with basic U.S. immigration law. It will concentrate upon the employment-based provisions of immigration law (EB), particularly those non-immigrant and permanent resident provisions that authorize employment. This course will provide an overview of immigration issues in employment, including an explanation of U.S. immigration policy and its impact on U.S. employers; visa categories available to employers and their foreign employees who wish to work in the U.S.; the anti-discrimination provisions of the Immigration Reform and Control Act (which cover employers not covered by Title VII); and Form I-9 issues. More specifically, discussion will include differences between permanent resident/immigrant visas (more commonly known as "green card") and nonimmigrant visa status and the subcategories within each, as well as the different criteria that must be met in order to qualify for specific visas. The several employment-based visas will be emphasized, including L-1 "intracompany transfer" visas, H-1B "specialty occupation" visas, E treaty/trader/investor visas, O, P, and TN visas under NAFTA.

7397 WRS: Law and Social Science - KWOK (offered in Spring  2017)
This course focuses on the role of the social sciences within the legal system. We will look at the impact of social science research and evidence in a variety of contexts, including trademark, damages, school segregation, and tort liability. For example, how should courts use survey evidence in determining whether trademarks cause confusion in the marketplace? The social sciences include the disciplines of psychology, economics, sociology, and anthropology. Students should expect to gain sufficient scientific literacy to critically read and apply social science research.

7397 WRS: Modern SCOTUS Justices - JOYCE (offered in Spring  2018)

7397 WRS: Modern SCOTUS/Justice O'Connor - JOYCE (offered in Fall  2018)
In 1981, the first woman ever was appointed to the Supreme Court of the United States. Much has changed since then, including the personnel of the Court. This seminar allows students to explore both the jurisprudence of the changing Court and the viewpoints of its leading personalities over the past half century. Special attention will be devoted to Justice Sandra Day O'Connor's legacy in American legal history, but students will be able to write papers about her jurisprudence and the jurisprudence of any of the 18 Justices (Ginsburg, Scalia, Kennedy et al.) with whom she served or who have succeeded her.

7297 WRS: Origins of the Federal Constitution - ESKRIDGE (offered in Fall  2018)
Origins of the Federal Constitution presents an intensive introduction to the historical sources of the Constitution. By reference to original source documents, the class considers the common law and other influences on early American government and justice, such as Locke, Montesquieu, and Blackstone’s Commentaries; the colonial experience leading to and immediately following the American Revolution; documents and debate directly relevant to formation of individual constitutional provisions and amendments; and the initial experience and understanding of the Constitution, through to Story’s Commentaries, in addition to later amendments. The class will also consider the influence and use of this material on modern interpretation of the Constitution.

7297 WRS: Origins of the Federal Constitution - ESKRIDGE (offered in Spring  2017)
Origins of the Federal Constitution presents an intensive introduction to the historical sources of the Constitution. By reference to original source documents, the class considers the common law and other influences on early American government and justice, such as Locke, Montesquieu, and Blackstone’s Commentaries; the colonial experience leading to and immediately following the American Revolution; documents and debate directly relevant to formation of individual constitutional provisions and amendments; and the initial experience and understanding of the Constitution, through to Story’s Commentaries, in addition to later amendments. The class will also consider the influence and use of this material on modern interpretation of the Constitution.

7397 WRS: Shameful/Ignored Supreme Court Cases - CHANDLER (offered in Fall  2018)
This writing seminar will examine the so-called anti-canon, the constitutional law cases that most people regard as horrible errors. Obvious candidates include Dred Scott v. Sanford, Lochner v. New York, Buck v. Bell, Korematsu v. United States, and others. It will also study Constitutional law cases of considerable importance but that are usually outside the mainstream of first year constitutional law classes (the sub-canon). Cases involving treatment of Native Americans, territories and immigrants will feature prominently here. With respect to the anti-canon, our study and student papers will focus on not only what, if anything, is wrong with at least some of these decisions, but also how and why the decisions went “awry," be it excessive politicization of the court, undue influence by outside forces, cognitive failings on the part of the justices, poor advocacy, a proclivity to decide extraneous issues, unfortunate decisions by the drafters of the Constitution, or other factors. It will, in some sense, be like an FAA examination of an airplane crash, looking for both immediate and systematic causes of a disaster. We will also explore what other cases might, at some future time, be added to the anti-canon. With respect to the sub-canon, we will explore the content of these cases and the reasons, good or bad, why they might fly beneath the radar. Students will be expected to read opinions, historical materials and subsequent writings concerning cases in the anti-canon and sub-canon.

7397 WRS: Shameful/Ignored Supreme Court Cases - CHANDLER (offered in Fall  2019)
This writing seminar will examine the so-called anti-canon, the constitutional law cases that most people regard as horrible errors. Obvious candidates include Dred Scott v. Sanford, Lochner v. New York, Buck v. Bell, Korematsu v. United States, and others. It will also study Constitutional law cases of considerable importance but that are usually outside the mainstream of first year constitutional law classes (the sub-canon). Cases involving treatment of Native Americans, territories and immigrants will feature prominently here. With respect to the anti-canon, our study and student papers will focus on not only what, if anything, is wrong with at least some of these decisions, but also how and why the decisions went “awry," be it excessive politicization of the court, undue influence by outside forces, cognitive failings on the part of the justices, poor advocacy, a proclivity to decide extraneous issues, unfortunate decisions by the drafters of the Constitution, or other factors. It will, in some sense, be like an FAA examination of an airplane crash, looking for both immediate and systematic causes of a disaster. We will also explore what other cases might, at some future time, be added to the anti-canon. With respect to the sub-canon, we will explore the content of these cases and the reasons, good or bad, why they might fly beneath the radar. Students will be expected to read opinions, historical materials and subsequent writings concerning cases in the anti-canon and sub-canon.

7397 WRS: Texas v. United States - BERMAN/RAVE (offered in Spring  2019)
Everything is bigger in Texas, including the state’s impact on Constitutional Law. Seminal decisions originating in Texas have shaped every area of constitutional doctrine from abortion to voting rights. This class will explore the role that the state of Texas and localities within Texas have played in instigating constitutional change in our federal system. It will engage in in-depth analysis of landmark Supreme Court cases that came out of Texas, including inquiries into how the case developed, why the Supreme Court granted certiorari, and the impact of the eventual decision on Texas and the nation.

7397 WRS: The Modern Corporation and Society - NELSON (offered in Spring  2017)
This course will consider the role of modern business corporations in society. Should corporations be run exclusively in the interests of shareholders? How should boards of directors manage the claims of various groups affected by corporations? By what standards should we judge executive compensation? Should corporations be entitled to claim various constitutional rights, including freedoms of speech, association, and religion? After surveying foundational work in corporate theory, we will address these questions through a close reading of materials in law, economics, political theory, and business ethics.